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Taniguchi M.,Niigata University | Ishiyama Y.,Niigata University | Takata T.,Niigata University | Nakanishi T.,Niigata University | And 6 more authors.
Journal of Bioscience and Bioengineering | Year: 2010

The bacteriocins produced by Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis C101910 (C101910) and NBRC 12007 (NBRC 12007) were used to prevent the growth of sake spoiling hiochi bacteria (Lactobacillus hilgardii, Lactobacillus fructivorans, and Lactobacillus paracasei) in namazake, which is raw (unpasteurized) sake. The bacteriocin concentrations required for decreasing the viable cell concentrations of L. hilgardii and L. fructivorans below the detection limit (1.0 × 102 cells/ml) in 24 h from the initial concentration of 4.0-9.5 × 105 cells/ml in the namazake at pH 4.5 and at 4°C, were 18-35 U/ml and 5.6 U/ml for the bacteriocin from C101910 and NBRC 12007, respectively. To decrease the viable cell concentration of L. paracasei from the initial concentration of 7.5 × 105 cells/ml to below the detection limit (1.0 × 102 cells/ml) in 24 h, 350 U/ml bacteriocin from C101910 and 140 U/ml bacteriocin from NBRC 12007 were required. In experiments using McIlvaine buffer (pH 4.5) with 15% ethanol instead of namazake as the medium, the viable cell concentrations of L. hilgardii and L. paracasei decreased to less than 1.0 × 102 cells/ml, whereas those of L. fructivorans decreased to less than 1.0 × 103 cells/ml, when bacteriocins were added at the concentrations that had proven effective in namazake. The membrane depolarization assay using a fluorescent probe showed that the presence of ethanol stimulated the collapse of the membrane potential induced by bacteriocins. The ethanol induced collapse of the membrane potential suggests that the application of bacteriocins at the storage stage of namazake is more beneficial than when used in other stages of the sake brewing process. © 2009 The Society for Biotechnology, Japan.


Kuribayashi T.,Niigata Prefectural Sake Research Institute | Tamura H.,Asahi Sake Brewing Co. | Sato K.,Niigata Prefectural Sake Research Institute | Nabekura Y.,Niigata Prefectural Sake Research Institute | And 9 more authors.
Bioscience, Biotechnology and Biochemistry | Year: 2013

In the fermentation industry, the traceability of microorganisms during the process is important to ensure safety and efficacy. Ethyl carbamate, a group-2A carcinogen, is produced from ethanol and urea during the storage of food/alcoholic beverages. We isolated non-urea-producing sake yeast car1 mutants carrying a discriminable molecular marker, and demonstrated, by the use of PCR assays, that these mutants are useful for traceability analysis and identification during the sake brewing process.


Anzawa Y.,Asahi Sake Brewing Co. | Nabekura Y.,Niigata Prefectural Sake Research Institute | Satoh K.,Asahi Sake Brewing Co. | Satoh Y.,Asahi Sake Brewing Co. | And 8 more authors.
Bioscience, Biotechnology and Biochemistry | Year: 2013

The Japanese high-quality sake Daiginjo-shu is made from highly polished rice (polishing ratio, less than 50%). Here we showed that the sake rice Koshitanrei (KOS) has an excellent polishing property. Rice grains of KOS had the same lined white-core region as the sake rice Yamadanishiki (YAM). The grain rigidity/ hardness of KOS was higher than that of the sake rice Gohyakumangoku (GOM). The loss ratio of KOS after high polishing by an industrial polishing machine was lower than that of GOM. Further, a clear taste of sake produced from KOS was confirmed by sensory evaluation.


Kawamoto S.,Hiroshima University | Kaneoke M.,Niigata Prefectural Sake Research Institute | Ohkouchi K.,Hiroshima University | Amano Y.,Hiroshima University | And 8 more authors.
Bioscience, Biotechnology and Biochemistry | Year: 2011

We tested the effect of oral administration of fermented sake lees with lactic acid bacteria (FESLAB) on a murine model of allergic rhinitis upon immunization and nasal sensitization with ovalbumin (OVA). We used Lactobacillus paracasei NPSRIk-4 (isolated from sake lees), and L. brevis NPSRIv-8 (from fermented milk) as starter strains to produce the FESLAB. Oral FESLAB administration resulted in the development of significantly fewer sneezing symptoms than those seen in sham control animals given sterile water. We also found that FESLAB suppressed the allergen-induced degranulation of RBL2H3 rat basophilic leukemia cells.


Kuribayashi T.,Niigata Prefectural Sake Research Institute | Kaneoke M.,Niigata Prefectural Sake Research Institute | Hirata D.,Hiroshima University | Watanabe K.-I.,Niigata Prefectural Sake Research Institute
Bioscience, Biotechnology and Biochemistry | Year: 2012

We show that the concentration of total free fatty acids (FFAs) in sake produced by yeast with high productivity of ethyl caproate could be approximated by the concentration of 2 FFAs, caproic and caprylic acids. Measurement of the total FFAs concentration by an enzymatic method proved useful for both estimating the ethyl caproate concentration in sake and also for yeast breeding. © 2012 W. S. Maney & Son Ltd.


Kuribayashi T.,Niigata Prefectural Sake Research Institute | Sato K.,Niigata Prefectural Sake Research Institute | Joh T.,Niigata University | Kaneoke M.,Niigata Prefectural Sake Research Institute | Watanabe K.-I.,Niigata Prefectural Sake Research Institute
Journal of Bioscience and Bioengineering | Year: 2016

Several colorimetric methods were combined and used for the discrimination of commercial sake samples, based on their constituent inorganic components. The method was very rapid, simple, and did not require expensive equipment. Further, we showed that this method has potential application in immediate differentiation of sake by the visual inspection. © 2015 The Society for Biotechnology, Japan.


PubMed | Niigata Prefectural Sake Research Institute and Niigata University
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Journal of bioscience and bioengineering | Year: 2015

Several colorimetric methods were combined and used for the discrimination of commercial sake samples, based on their constituent inorganic components. The method was very rapid, simple, and did not require expensive equipment. Further, we showed that this method has potential application in immediate differentiation of sake by the visual inspection.


Kuribayashi T.,Niigata Prefectural Sake Research Institute | Sato K.,Niigata Prefectural Sake Research Institute | Kasai D.,Nagaoka University of Technology | Fukuda M.,Nagaoka University of Technology | And 2 more authors.
Journal of Bioscience and Bioengineering | Year: 2014

We developed a loop-mediated isothermal amplification method that targets the PHO3 gene for discriminating sake yeast strains. Our data indicate that this assay is simple, rapid, and useful to use for differentiation of specific yeasts in sake mash. © 2014 The Society for Biotechnology, Japan.


PubMed | Niigata Prefectural Sake Research Institute
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Bioscience, biotechnology, and biochemistry | Year: 2012

We show that the concentration of total free fatty acids (FFAs) in sake produced by yeast with high productivity of ethyl caproate could be approximated by the concentration of 2 FFAs, caproic and caprylic acids. Measurement of the total FFAs concentration by an enzymatic method proved useful for both estimating the ethyl caproate concentration in sake and also for yeast breeding.


PubMed | Niigata Prefectural Sake Research Institute
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Bioscience, biotechnology, and biochemistry | Year: 2013

In the fermentation industry, the traceability of microorganisms during the process is important to ensure safety and efficacy. Ethyl carbamate, a group-2A carcinogen, is produced from ethanol and urea during the storage of food/alcoholic beverages. We isolated non-urea-producing sake yeast car1 mutants carrying a discriminable molecular marker, and demonstrated, by the use of PCR assays, that these mutants are useful for traceability analysis and identification during the sake brewing process.

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