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News Article | January 31, 2017
Site: www.medicalnewstoday.com

Researchers at the University of Pittsburgh and Washington University in St. Louis have provided the first details of how enteroviruses, which cause millions of infections worldwide annually, may enter the body through the intestine. The results of the study are published in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. Enterovirus infections are associated with diseases that can range from mild flu-like symptoms to much more severe outcomes such as inflammation in the brain or heart, acute paralysis, and even death. Enterovirus infections acquired within neonatal intensive care units (NICU) can be devastating as newborns are particularly susceptible to infection by these viruses. Enteroviruses are a class of viruses that are the second most common human infectious agents and are primarily transmitted through close person-to-person contact, touching infected surfaces, or ingesting food or water containing the virus. "Despite their major global impact, especially on the health of children, little is known about the route that these viruses take to cross the intestine, their primary point of entry. Our approach has for the first time shed some light on this process," said senior author Carolyn Coyne, Ph.D., associate professor of microbiology and molecular genetics at the Pitt School of Medicine. In the study, researchers isolated stem cells from premature human small intestines and grew them in the laboratory into enteroids, or so-called "mini-guts," which contained the different cell types and tissue structures that are normally found in the human intestine. Using the mini-gut model, they demonstrated that echovirus 11 (E11), the enterovirus most commonly associated with NICU infections, induced significant damage to the enteroids, which could facilitate passage of the virus into the bloodstream from the infected intestine. The results also provided the first evidence that different types of enteroviruses could target distinct cells within the gastrointestinal tract and might vary in their effectiveness at infecting intestinal cells. "This study not only provides important insights into enterovirus infections, but also provides an important model that could be used to test the efficacy of anti-enterovirus therapeutics in the premature intestine," said Misty Good, M.D., assistant professor of pediatrics at the Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis and co-senior author of the study. Other authors of the study included Coyne G. Drummond, B.S., and Congrong Ma, M.Sc., of the University of Pittsburgh; and Alexa M. Bolock, B.S., and Cliff J. Luke, Ph.D., of Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis. The study was funded by National Institutes of Health grants R01AI081759 and K08DK101608, the Burroughs Wellcome Fund, and Children's Hospital of Pittsburgh of UPMC.


Research and Markets has announced the addition of the "Global Infant Warmers and Incubators Market Analysis & Trends - Product Type (Transport Incubator, Labor and Delivery and Neonatal intensive care unit (NICU)) - Forecast to 2025" report to their offering. The study focuses on market trends, leading players, supply chain trends, technological innovations, key developments, and future strategies. With comprehensive market assessment across the major geographies such as North America, Europe, Asia Pacific, Middle East, Latin America and Rest of the world the report is a valuable asset for the existing players, new entrants and the future investors. Some of the prominent trends that the market is witnessing include improvement of integrated and multifunctional infant care equipment, rise in NICU admissions count, recent technological developments of Infant Warmers and Incubators and growth opportunities/investment opportunities. Based on product type the market is categorized into transport incubator, labor and delivery and neonatal intensive care unit (NICU). Transport incubator is further segmented by external transport incubator and internal transport incubator. labor and delivery is sub divided into labor and delivery warmer and labor and delivery incubator. Neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) is further segmented by NICU convertible warmer/incubator, NICU incubator and NICU warmer. This industry report analyzes the global markets for Infant Warmers and Incubators across all the given segments on global as well as regional levels presented in the research scope. The study provides historical market data for 2013, 2014 revenue estimations are presented for 2015 and forecasts from 2016 till 2025. - The report provides a detailed analysis on current and future market trends to identify the investment opportunities - Market forecasts till 2025, using estimated market values as the base numbers - Key market trends across the business segments, Regions and Countries - Key developments and strategies observed in the market - Market Dynamics such as Drivers, Restraints, Opportunities and other trends - In-depth company profiles of key players and upcoming prominent players - Growth prospects among the emerging nations through 2025 - Market opportunities and recommendations for new investments Key Topics Covered: 1 Market Outline 2 Executive Summary 3 Market Overview 3.1 Current Trends 3.1.1 Improvement of Integrated And Multifunctional Infant Care Equipment 3.1.2 Rise in NICU Admissions Count 3.1.3 Recent Technological Developments of Infant Warmers and Incubators 3.1.4 Growth Opportunities/Investment Opportunities 3.2 Drivers 3.3 Constraints 3.4 Industry Attractiveness 4 Infant Warmers and Incubators Market, By Product Type 4.1 Transport Incubator 4.1.1 Transport Incubator Market Forecast to 2025 (US$ MN) 4.1.1.1 External Transport Incubator 4.1.1.1.1 External Transport Incubator Market Forecast to 2025 (US$ MN) 4.1.1.2 Internal Transport Incubator 4.1.1.2.1 Internal Transport Incubator Market Forecast to 2025 (US$ MN) 4.2 Labor And Delivery 4.2.1 Labor And Delivery Market Forecast to 2025 (US$ MN) 4.2.1.1 Labor And Delivery Warmer 4.2.1.1.1 Labor And Delivery Warmer Market Forecast to 2025 (US$ MN) 4.2.1.2 Labor And Delivery Incubator 4.2.1.2.1 Labor And Delivery Incubator Market Forecast to 2025 (US$ MN) 4.3 Neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) 4.3.1 Neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) Market Forecast to 2025 (US$ MN) 4.3.1.1 NICU Convertible Warmer/Incubator 4.3.1.1.1 NICU Convertible Warmer/Incubator Market Forecast to 2025 (US$ MN) 4.3.1.2 NICU Incubator 4.3.1.2.1 NICU Incubator Market Forecast to 2025 (US$ MN) 4.3.1.3 NICU Warmer 4.3.1.3.1 NICU Warmer Market Forecast to 2025 (US$ MN) 5 Infant Warmers and Incubators Market, By Geography 6 Key Player Activities 6.1 Mergers & Acquisitions 6.2 Partnerships, Joint Venture's, Collaborations and Agreements 6.3 Product Launch & Expansions 6.4 Other Activities 7 Leading Companies 7.1 Natus Medical Incorporated 7.2 Weyer GmbH 7.3 GE Healthcare 7.4 Phoenix Medical Systems 7.5 International Biomedical 7.6 Philips Healthcare 7.7 Dräger Medical 7.8 Datex Ohmeda Ltd 7.9 Smiths Medical 7.10 Fisher & Paykel Healthcare Corp. 7.11 MTTS 7.12 AVI Healthcare 7.13 Nonin Medical 7.14 Natus Medical 7.15 Ibis Medical For more information about this report visit http://www.researchandmarkets.com/research/5kh6bc/global_infant


DUARTE, CA--(Marketwired - Feb 22, 2017) - Prolacta Bioscience® -- the nation's leading provider of human milk-based neonatal nutritional products, announced today that it will present at the Cowen and Company 37th Annual Health Care Conference in Boston, MA. Scott Elster, Prolacta's President and Chief Executive Officer, is scheduled to present on Tuesday, March 7, 2017 at 2:30 PM EST. When used as part of an exclusive human milk diet (EHMD)1, Prolacta Bioscience's neonatal nutritional products are clinically proven to improve health outcomes2,3,4 and reduce hospital costs5,6 for critically ill, extremely premature infants in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) weighing between 500-1,250g at birth, as compared to cow milk-based fortifier or preterm formula. About Prolacta Bioscience Prolacta Bioscience, Inc. is a privately-held life sciences company dedicated to Advancing the Science of Human Milk®. The company pioneered the development of human milk-based neonatal nutritional products to meet the needs of critically ill, premature infants in the NICU. Prolacta leads the industry in the quality and safety of nutritional products made from breast milk and operates the first and only pharmaceutical-grade manufacturing facility for the processing of human breast milk. For more information please visit www.prolacta.com. 1 An EHMD is when 100% of the protein, fat and carbohydrates in an infant's intake are derived solely from human milk. 2 Sullivan S, et al. "An Exclusively Human Milk-Based Diet is Associated with a Lower Rate of Necrotizing Enterocolitis than a Diet of Human Milk and Bovine Milk-Based Products." The Journal of Pediatrics. April 2010. 156(4):562-567. doi: 10.1016/j.jpeds.2009.10.040. The randomized study of 207 infants weighing 500-1,250g compared the benefits of an exclusive human milk diet with a diet of both human milk-based and cow milk-based products. 3 Cristofalo EA, et al. "Randomized Trial of Exclusive Human Milk versus Preterm Formula Diets in Extremely Premature Infants." The Journal of Pediatrics. December 2013. 163(6):1592-1595. doi: 10.1016/j.jpeds.2013.07.011. The multicenter randomized controlled study examined 53 extremely premature infants weighing 500-1250g who were fed either a bovine milk-based preterm formula or an exclusive human milk diet, comparing the duration of parenteral nutrition, growth and morbidity. 4 Abrams SA, et al. "Greater Mortality and Morbidity in Extremely Preterm Infants Fed a Diet Containing Cow Milk Protein Products." Breastfeeding Medicine. June 2014. 9(6): 281-0285. doi:10.1089/bfm.2014.0024. This cohort study included 260 extremely preterm infants born weighing less than 1,250g who received a diet that ranged from 100% cow milk to 100% human milk. 5 Ganapathy V, et al. "Costs of Necrotizing Enterocolitis and Cost-Effectiveness of Exclusively Human Milk-Based Products in Feeding Extremely Premature Infants." Breastfeeding Medicine. February 2012. 7(1):29-37. doi: 10.1089/bfm.2011.0002. This cost-effectiveness analysis of 2,560 extremely premature infants less than 28 weeks gestational age in 257 hospitals nationwide, comparing the impact of an exclusive human milk diet composed of mother's milk fortified with a human milk-based fortifier versus mother's milk fortified with cow milk-based fortifier. 6 Assad M, et al. "Decreased Cost and Improved Feeding Tolerance in VLBW Infants Fed an Exclusive Human Milk Diet." Journal of Perinatology. March 2016. 36:216-220. doi: 10.1038/jp.2015.168. The study retrospectively looked at 293 preterm infants between gestational ages of 23 to 34 weeks and birth weights between 490-1,700g in the Level III NICU. The study compared the clinical and financial impacts between infants that were fed an exclusive human milk diet; cow milk-based fortifier and maternal milk; mixed combination of maternal milk, cow milk-based fortifier and cow milk-based formula; and formula between March 2009 and March 2014.


DUARTE, CA--(Marketwired - Feb 16, 2017) - Prolacta Bioscience®, the pioneer in human milk-based neonatal nutritional products, announced today that the first patient has been enrolled in a clinical study to evaluate the effect of a specially fortified exclusive human milk diet (EHMD)1 to improve growth in infants who have undergone surgery for a serious heart defect known as single ventricle cardiac physiology. Prolacta developed a first-of-its-kind, human milk-based fortifier to address the post-surgical nutrition needs of this fragile infant population. Single ventricle cardiac physiology occurs in five out of 100,000 live births,2 and results in a range of clinical problems resulting from the heart having only one adequate ventricle or pumping chamber.2 The condition is usually fatal unless treated by a series of surgeries.3 Babies with single ventricle cardiac physiology often have difficulty breathing, feeding and growing.3,4 "These medically frail newborns are at high risk for growth failure, due to increased caloric demands due to their heart and pulmonary conditions. This presents unique nutritional challenges," said Principal Investigator Cynthia Blanco, M.D., University of Texas Health Science Center. "We believe a densely fortified human milk diet may be a real benefit to these infants with an ultimate goal of optimizing their nutritional status prior to their second surgery." "While not preemies, these babies have a similar need for rich nutrition delivered in small volumes," said Scott Elster, CEO of Prolacta. "This study is the first to explore the benefits of human milk-based fortifiers in a population of fragile infants other than preemies. The medical centers will be using a new formulation that we developed specifically for these babies, and we hope that it will make a difference to their health and healing." The randomized controlled study will evaluate a minimum of 84 infants, starting at age seven days or younger, who require surgery to correct a single ventricle cardiac physiology present at birth, and who were fed an EHMD prior to study enrollment. The study will measure growth rate and clinical outcomes for up to 30 days following surgery in these infants. One group will be fed an EHMD that includes a new formulation of Prolacta's highest caloric density exclusive human milk-based fortifier, while the other group will receive a standard diet that includes some cow milk-based nutrition. The hypothesis is that infants fed the EHMD will have short-term benefits, including improved growth, reduced episodes of feeding intolerance, sepsis and necrotizing enterocolitis (damaged intestinal tissue), reduced stay in the hospital and potentially improved long-term neurodevelopmental outcomes. The study is titled, "A Randomized Controlled Trial to Evaluate Growth Velocity and Clinical Outcomes of Infants with Single Ventricle Physiology Fed an Exclusive Human Milk Diet with Early Nutritional Fortification Following Surgical Repair." It is expected to take place at 12 centers: University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio (lead center), San Antonio, Texas; University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, Texas; Texas Children's Hospital, Houston, Texas; Cook Children's Medical Center, Fort Worth, Texas; Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, Philadelphia, Pa.; Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center, Cincinnati, Ohio; Children's Hospital of Orange County, Orange, Calif.; Ann & Robert H. Lurie Children's Hospital of Chicago, Chicago, Ill.; Columbia University Medical Center, New York, N.Y.; Emory University Hospital, Atlanta, Ga.; University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center, Oklahoma City, Ok.; and UF Health Shands Children's Hospital, Gainesville, Fla. About Prolacta Bioscience Prolacta Bioscience, Inc. is a privately-held life sciences company dedicated to Advancing the Science of Human Milk®. The company pioneered the development of human milk-based neonatal nutritional products to meet the needs of critically ill, premature infants in the NICU. Prolacta leads the industry in the quality and safety of nutritional products made from donor breast milk and operates the first and only pharmaceutical-grade manufacturing facility for the processing of human milk. For more information, please visit www.prolacta.com. 1 An exclusive human milk diet (EHMD) is when 100 percent of the protein, fat and carbohydrates in an infant's intake are derived solely from human milk. 2 Adult Congenital Heart Association. "Single Ventricle Defects and the Fontan." Accessed Nov. 13, 2016. 3 Cadet, J.V., "Children's Hospital of Philadelphia: Treating Single Ventricle Defects." Cardiovascular Business. July 26, 2010. Accessed Nov. 13, 2016. 4 American Heart Association. "Single Ventricle Defects." Updated Oct. 21, 2015. Accessed Nov. 13, 2016.


DUARTE, CA--(Marketwired - Feb 17, 2017) - Prolacta Bioscience® -- the nation's leading provider of human milk-based neonatal nutritional products, announced today that it will present at the 2017 RBC Capital Markets Healthcare Conference in New York, NY. Scott Elster, Prolacta's President and Chief Executive Officer, is scheduled to present on Wednesday, February 22, 2017 at 11:20 AM EST. When used as part of an exclusive human milk diet (EHMD)1, Prolacta Bioscience's neonatal nutritional products are clinically proven to improve health outcomes2,3,4 and reduce hospital costs5,6 for critically ill, extremely premature infants in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) weighing between 500-1,250g at birth, as compared to cow milk-based fortifier or preterm formula. About Prolacta Bioscience Prolacta Bioscience, Inc. is a privately-held life sciences company dedicated to Advancing the Science of Human Milk®. The company pioneered the development of human milk-based neonatal nutritional products to meet the needs of critically ill, premature infants in the NICU. Prolacta leads the industry in the quality and safety of nutritional products made from breast milk and operates the first and only pharmaceutical-grade manufacturing facility for the processing of human breast milk. For more information please visit www.prolacta.com. 1 An EHMD is when 100% of the protein, fat and carbohydrates in an infant's intake are derived solely from human milk. 2 Sullivan S, et al. "An Exclusively Human Milk-Based Diet is Associated with a Lower Rate of Necrotizing Enterocolitis than a Diet of Human Milk and Bovine Milk-Based Products." The Journal of Pediatrics. April 2010. 156(4):562-567. doi: 10.1016/j.jpeds.2009.10.040. The randomized study of 207 infants weighing 500-1,250g compared the benefits of an exclusive human milk diet with a diet of both human milk-based and cow milk-based products. 3 Cristofalo EA, et al. "Randomized Trial of Exclusive Human Milk versus Preterm Formula Diets in Extremely Premature Infants." The Journal of Pediatrics. December 2013. 163(6):1592-1595. doi: 10.1016/j.jpeds.2013.07.011. The multicenter randomized controlled study examined 53 extremely premature infants weighing 500-1250g who were fed either a bovine milk-based preterm formula or an exclusive human milk diet, comparing the duration of parenteral nutrition, growth and morbidity. 4 Abrams SA, et al. "Greater Mortality and Morbidity in Extremely Preterm Infants Fed a Diet Containing Cow Milk Protein Products." Breastfeeding Medicine. June 2014. 9(6): 281-0285. doi:10.1089/bfm.2014.0024. This cohort study included 260 extremely preterm infants born weighing less than 1,250g who received a diet that ranged from 100% cow milk to 100% human milk. 5 Ganapathy V, et al. "Costs of Necrotizing Enterocolitis and Cost-Effectiveness of Exclusively Human Milk-Based Products in Feeding Extremely Premature Infants." Breastfeeding Medicine. February 2012. 7(1):29-37. doi: 10.1089/bfm.2011.0002. This cost-effectiveness analysis of 2,560 extremely premature infants less than 28 weeks gestational age in 257 hospitals nationwide, comparing the impact of an exclusive human milk diet composed of mother's milk fortified with a human milk-based fortifier versus mother's milk fortified with cow milk-based fortifier. 6 Assad M, et al. "Decreased Cost and Improved Feeding Tolerance in VLBW Infants Fed an Exclusive Human Milk Diet." Journal of Perinatology. March 2016. 36:216-220. doi: 10.1038/jp.2015.168. The study retrospectively looked at 293 preterm infants between gestational ages of 23 to 34 weeks and birth weights between 490-1,700g in the Level III NICU. The study compared the clinical and financial impacts between infants that were fed an exclusive human milk diet; cow milk-based fortifier and maternal milk; mixed combination of maternal milk, cow milk-based fortifier and cow milk-based formula; and formula between March 2009 and March 2014.


INDIANAPOLIS--(BUSINESS WIRE)--Increased reimbursement to doctors who offer group prenatal care improves birth outcomes and significantly reduces Medicaid plan costs, according to a new study co-authored by Anthem, Inc. Medicaid is the largest payer of maternity health benefits in the U.S., and inpatient costs associated with preterm births exceed $6 billion per year – representing half of all costs associated with infant births. One in 10 American babies is born prematurely, placing the newborn at increased risk of death, medical complications and lifelong health challenges. The study, published in the January-February 2017 edition of Women’s Health Issues Journal, is the first to examine the newborn intensive care unit (NICU) cost savings from the group prenatal care program, CenteringPregnancy, to payers when a managed care organization provided enhanced reimbursement to doctors to defray the costs and reward providers for encouraging patient participation in the program. “Anthem is dedicated to the health of American families, which is why our Foundation is a longtime champion of CenteringPregnancy through financial support of the March of Dimes and the Centering Healthcare Institute,” said Karen Shea, Anthem’s vice president of maternal child health and one of the co-authors of the paper. “This study demonstrates that designing payment programs that sustain CenteringPregnancy at the ob/gyn practice level are a potentially sound investment for payers to reduce inpatient costs and help more babies get a healthy start in life.” The CenteringPregnancy model requires significant upfront and continuing investment from practices, including patient education materials, annual certification fees and office support staff training. Although increased costs to the practices may be small in comparison with the potential savings for payers and the overall health care system, it often remains a barrier to implementation and few payers have developed enhanced reimbursement policies to cover the cost of CenteringPregnancy. The study examined an enhanced reimbursement pilot project from the South Carolina Department of Health and Human Services to BlueChoice Health Plan South Carolina Medicaid, which in turn passed the additional incentive payments along to participating prenatal care practices. The study compared a group of 85 pregnant women enrolled in Medicaid who attended at least four CenteringPregnancy sessions with a similar group of expectant mothers who instead saw their doctor individually. The pregnant women participating in the CenteringPregnancy program had a 3.5 percent NICU admission rate, while 12 percent of the matched control group had babies needing NICU care. The lower rate of hospital admissions resulted in an estimated net cost savings of $67,293 for the Medicaid managed care organization covering the 85 women. The typical care model for women in the U.S. with uncomplicated pregnancies involves brief individual doctor appointments focused on identifying medical risks, with limited opportunity for counseling and support. In the Centering Pregnancy model, groups of eight to 12 pregnant women due within the same month attend sessions with an individual medical assessment followed by a 90-minute group discussion on topics including stress management, labor and nutrition. The open discussion format promotes information sharing among women, social support and the involvement of significant others. “The value of the group model is that it engages patients in their own health, enhances the care experience for both patient and provider, and creates a community of support,” says Angie Truesdale, CEO of Centering Healthcare Institute. “All of these components contribute to cost savings and healthier moms and babies.” In addition to Anthem, representatives from BlueChoice Health Plan South Carolina Medicaid, Greenville Health System and the Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology at Greenville Health System co-authored the paper. Anthem is working to transform health care with trusted and caring solutions. Our health plan companies deliver quality products and services that give their members access to the care they need. With over 73 million people served by its affiliated companies, including approximately 40 million within in its family of health plans, Anthem is one of the nation’s leading health benefits companies. For more information about Anthem’s family of companies, please visit www.antheminc.com/companies. Centering Healthcare Institute is improving health by transforming care through Centering groups. It has developed and sustained the Centering model in more than 450 practice sites and in some of the largest health systems in the world. They have partnered with many dedicated individuals and organizations to build a future where group healthcare becomes the standard of care. For more information on Centering Healthcare Institute and the Centering models of group care, visit www.centeringhealthcare.org.


News Article | March 1, 2017
Site: www.businesswire.com

ORLANDO, Fla.--(BUSINESS WIRE)--As a result of funds raised at the recent Diamond Resorts Invitational, Diamond Resorts International® presented a check for $570,000 to Florida Hospital for Children. The proceeds were raised during the annual event’s silent and live auctions at Mystic Dunes Resort & Golf Club in Celebration, Florida, from January 12-15, 2017. The tournament-related events have now raised more than $2.3 million for Florida Hospital for Children over the past four years. Florida Hospital for Children is one of the premier children’s hospitals in the nation, setting standards for innovation, quality and comprehensive care. The child-centric healing environment designed to keep kids comfortable is complemented by a staff of world-class doctors, specialists, nurses and healthcare professionals utilizing advanced technologies, therapies and treatments. Florida Hospital for Children’s team of over 135 highly skilled pediatric specialists delivers extraordinary care across more than 35 pediatric subspecialties, including a children's emergency department; the Level IV Comprehensive Pediatric Epilepsy Center; a world-renowned pediatric heart center; a Level III neonatal intensive care unit (NICU); and the Children’s Center for Cancer and Blood Disorders, Central Florida’s first and only pediatric bone marrow transplant program affiliated with Duke Health. Florida Hospital for Children’s flagship facility is a seven-story, 201-bed state-of-the-art hospital designed with the help of Walt Disney Imagineers, families and clinicians. (www.floridahospitalforchildren.com) “Year after year, Diamond Resorts International® exceeds our expectations and continues to provide tremendous support through proceeds raised at their live and silent auctions at the Diamond Resorts Invitational,” said Marla Silliman, Senior Executive Officer, Florida Hospital for Children. “We are honored to accept this generous donation as it will further our commitment to saving children’s lives and improving their health.” The Diamond Resorts Invitational™ was nationally televised on Golf Channel from Friday, January 13 through Sunday, January 15, and featured a groundbreaking format with 27 PGA TOUR Champions, four LPGA stars, and 48 sports and entertainment celebrities. The historic event marked the first time multiple LPGA players have competed individually against the PGA TOUR Champions in a PGA TOUR-sanctioned event. The Diamond Resorts Invitational was a week-long, full-scale, multidimensional vacation experience consisting of activities for all ages, family-friendly excursions, dinner parties and headline concerts featuring performances by Jana Kramer, Colt Ford, Jake Owen and Diamond Resorts’ newest celebrity ambassador, Cole Swindell. “The Diamond Resorts Invitational is a unique platform that allows us to leverage our ability to deliver hospitality on a large scale, while also giving back to our local community,” said Michael Flaskey, Chief Operating Officer, Diamond Resorts International®. “We have seen all the ways that our donations have made a significant impact on the lives of the children and families at Florida Hospital for Children over the years, and we are grateful for the opportunity to be a contributor to the hospital’s vital lifesaving mission.” Diamond Resorts International®, with its network of more than 370 vacation destinations located in 35 countries throughout the continental United States, Hawaii, Canada, Mexico, the Caribbean, South America, Central America, Europe, Asia, Australasia and Africa, provides guests with choice and flexibility to let them create their dream vacation, whether they are traveling an hour away or around the world. Our relaxing vacations have the power to give guests an increased sense of happiness and satisfaction in their lives, while feeling healthier and more fulfilled in their relationships, by enjoying memorable and meaningful experiences that let them Stay Vacationed.™ Diamond Resorts International® manages vacation ownership resorts and sells vacation ownership points that provide members and owners with Vacations for Life® at over 370 managed and affiliated properties and cruise itineraries.


News Article | February 15, 2017
Site: www.prweb.com

The National Association of Professional Women (NAPW) honors Rita Kluny as a 2016-2017 inductee into its VIP Woman of the Year Circle. She is recognized with this prestigious distinction for leadership in holistic healing. NAPW is the nation’s leading networking organization exclusively for professional women, boasting more than 850,000 members, a thriving eChapter and over 200 operating Local Chapters. “I’m pleased to welcome Rita into this exceptional group of professional women,” said NAPW President Star Jones. “Her knowledge and experience in her industry are valuable assets to her company and community.” Rita Kluny saved lives in the NICU, but there was an emotional disconnect. She explored other venues of healing and came across the American Holistic Nurses Association, becoming certified in Holistic Nursing, and Healing Touch. It is an energy-based therapy that promotes harmony and balance to accelerate one’s own healing process. She brought traditional nursing and the healing arts together to create a venue in which caretakers can better care for their babies. As a Healing Touch practitioner and instructor since 1993, Ms. Kluny started Healing Touch for Babies in 2000 and helps children and mothers all over the country. “I have a keen intuitive sense of where moms are coming from and what they need to hear to be able to move forward as they transition into motherhood,” Ms. Kluny said. To her, education is the key. With her guidance and practice, families can create the lives they want, and the quality time to go with it. Teaching those who are afraid of this unfamiliar style of medicine, love and showing the way to a new beginning makes it all worthwhile for Ms. Kluny. In the future, she hopes to create a radio show to interview experts about conscious pregnancy, birthing and parenting support. AboutNAPW NAPW’s mission is to provide an exclusive, highly advanced networking forum to successful women executives, professionals and entrepreneurs where they can aspire, connect and achieve. Through innovative resources, unique tools and progressive benefits, professional women interact, exchange ideas, advance their knowledge and empower each other.


News Article | February 11, 2017
Site: www.techtimes.com

Huggies now has diapers for prematurely born babies. Called Huggies Little Snugglers Nano Preemie Diapers, the diapers are specially designed for babies weighing less than 2 pounds, particularly made to protect delicate skin while promoting healthy development and growth in preemies. Diapers for babies are numerous, but with fewer than 1.4 percent of babies born as preemies weighing below 2 pounds, there is a severe lack of options for the fragile population. Huggies responded to this need by working with Neonatal Intensive Care Unit nurses and neonatal therapists, using input from experts to develop the Little Snugglers diapers. "We're passionate about helping all babies thrive, especially the smallest and most fragile," said Eleonora Daireaux, Huggies North America vice president, adding the new diaper reflects the brand's ongoing commitment of delivering innovative NICU solutions. From concept to launch, the Huggies Little Snugglers Nano Preemie Diapers only took six months, as the brand's research, skin science, manufacturing, and product safety experts strove to address the need at the soonest time possible. Huggies' new diaper features a narrow absorbent pad and is fitted with gentle, specially sized fasteners to offer a flexible fit that will offer comfort when preemies are in a fetal tuck position where their legs and arms are placed close to their bodies. Gentle leg gathers and a soft, smooth liner were also added for leak protection that doesn't irritate fragile and underdeveloped skin. According to infant development specialist Anjanette Lee from Memorial Hermann Southwest Hospital, one of nine NICUs where Huggies' new diaper was tested, the Little Snugglers conformed to babies' bottoms without gaps and limiting movement in the babies' legs. She added that less material at the waist and thinner fasteners used were effective in providing a good fit while also protecting the babies' fragile skin. To ensure quality, Huggies has every diaper go through a rigorous inspection process that includes a 40-point hand inspection before being individually folded and then hand-packed for distribution. The Little Snugglers Nano Preemie Diaper is part of Huggies' No Baby Unhugged program established to make sure that all babies receive the hugs they require to thrive. According to research, hugs don't only ease stress but can also help improve sleep, keep heart beats at a normal rate, and promote healthy weight gain in babies. For every signup Huggies receives under the No Baby Unhugged program, the brand donates $5 to volunteer hugging efforts. By funding volunteer hugging programs in hospitals, Huggies is helping ensure that the 380,000 preemies born in the United States every year, alongside all other newborns, get enough human contact for their well-being. "When babies have a longer stay in the NICU and parents unfortunately can't be there all of the time, our NICU volunteers are able to step in and help provide this crucial interaction," said Rebecca Meyers, Lurie Children's Hospital child life manager. Ann & Robert H. Lurie Children's Hospital of Chicago was the first hospital to receive a grant from Huggies under the No Baby Unhugged program. © 2017 Tech Times, All rights reserved. Do not reproduce without permission.


DUBLIN, Feb. 20, 2017 /PRNewswire/ -- Research and Markets has announced the addition of the "Global Infant Warmers and Incubators Market Analysis & Trends - Product Type (Transport Incubator, Labor and Delivery and Neonatal intensive care unit (NICU)) - Forecast to 2025" report...

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