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News Article | May 10, 2017
Site: www.labdesignnews.com

Project team: Realty Trust Group (Owner’s Program Manager); BarberMcMurry architects (Architect of Record); Shepley Bulfinch (Design Architect); ESG (Engineering Services Group) (Mechanical, Plumbing); Vreeland Engineers Inc. (Electrical); Land Development Solutions (Civil); Ross Bryan Associates Inc. (Structure); CRJA and Hedstrom Design LLC (Landscape) Description: An official opening has been held for the East Tennessee Children’s Hospital Surgery and NICU addition and renovations. Located in Knoxville, the new tower houses a 14-room surgery platform, multi-specialty outpatient clinics and a 44-room all-private neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) to meet the growing demand for pediatric health services in the region. This expansion and the accompanying renovation of vacated space in the old building fulfills the goals of Children’s Hospital’s strategic master plan, significantly upgrading its facilities and enhancing Children’s Hospital’s visibility as the region’s only comprehensive pediatric center. Symbolizing the hospital’s continued commitment to exceptional patient- and family-centered care, the roof garden with a view of the Smokey Mountains and the multi-level glass bridge featuring both family and public spaces become the central design features of the new expansion. The metal panel exterior frames the bridges and the roof garden, creating an urban signature for the new expansion, while the use of terracotta on the façade blends the addition with the existing brickwork of the older hospital buildings. The bridge spans the entryway below joining new and old, while the public spaces and roof garden animate the campus. The five-story tower, which seems to change color depending on vantage point, emphasizes the significance of natural light in this project. The entire expansion sits atop a 165-space, two-story parking garage. One of the most successful aspects of the Children’s Hospital expansion is the 44-bed NICU located on the top floor of the building. Featuring all private rooms, amenities in the new space include a family suite with kitchen facilities, resource center, and a walk-out roof garden that became a defining space for the NICU and provides a much-appreciated outdoor respite area for families and staff. The large private rooms allow for unlimited bonding time with parents and other family members, especially siblings who had previously been prohibited from visiting due to space limitations and potential health concerns.


DUBLIN--(BUSINESS WIRE)--Research and Markets has announced the addition of the "Australia Market Report for Fetal and Neonatal Monitoring 2017 - MedCore" report to their offering. The fetal and neonatal monitoring market includes fetal monitors for both antepartum and intrapartum monitoring, in addition to critical care monitors for premature infants. The neonatal monitoring market represented the majority of the total fetal and neonatal monitoring market. Neonatal monitoring is driven by the demand for high cost continuous critical care monitoring in any hospital with a maternity ward or neonatal intensive care unit (NICU). Fetal monitoring encompassed the remainder of the market and is driven by increased public awareness of technology for monitoring the development of a fetus. Over the forecast period the neonatal monitoring segment is expected to account for a growing percentage of the total market. This subtle shift may be attributed to a tendency for hospitals to invest in fetal monitors featuring improved, albeit more expensive, wireless connectivity options among other updated features. By 2023, however, the revenue mix will stabilize and only nominal fluctuations are expected in the long-term. Growth in these mature markets is generally minimal considering that equipment is usually purchased on a replacement basis. In recent years, however, hospitals have begun to purchase equipment that can be integrated with their hospital information systems in order to foster improved clinical workflow. Consequently, as hospitals continue to replace their monitors, they will instead opt for more advanced devices with updated features, such as wireless patient connectivity and device networking capabilities. This trend will help to stabilize the market for fetal and neonatal monitors over the forecast period. For more information about this report visit http://www.researchandmarkets.com/research/8v5h7k/australia_market


DUBLIN--(BUSINESS WIRE)--Research and Markets has announced the addition of the "Japan Market Report for Fetal and Neonatal Monitoring 2017 - MedCore" report to their offering. The fetal and neonatal monitoring market included fetal monitors for both antepartum and intrapartum monitoring, in addition to critical care monitors for premature infants. The neonatal monitoring market represented the majority of the total fetal and neonatal monitoring market. Neonatal monitoring is driven by the demand for high cost continuous critical care monitoring in any hospital with a maternity ward or neonatal intensive care unit (NICU). Fetal monitoring encompassed the remainder of the market and is driven by increased public awareness of technology for monitoring the development of a fetus. Over the forecast period the neonatal monitoring segment is expected to account for a growing percentage of the total market. This subtle shift may be attributed to a tendency for hospitals to invest in fetal monitors featuring improved, albeit more expensive, wireless connectivity options among other updated features. By 2023, however, the revenue mix will stabilize and only nominal fluctuations are expected in the long-term. Growth in these mature markets is generally minimal considering that equipment is usually purchased on a replacement basis. In recent years, however, hospitals have begun to purchase equipment that can be integrated with their hospital information systems and improve clinical workflows. Consequently, as hospitals continue to replace their monitors, they will instead opt for more advanced devices with updated features, such as wireless patient connectivity and device networking capabilities. This trend will help to stabilize the market for fetal and neonatal monitors over the forecast period. For more information about this report visit http://www.researchandmarkets.com/research/9cfqk9/japan_market


DUBLIN--(BUSINESS WIRE)--Research and Markets has announced the addition of the "South Korea Market Report for Fetal and Neonatal Monitoring 2017 - MedCore" report to their offering. The fetal and neonatal monitoring market includes fetal monitors for both antepartum and intrapartum monitoring, in addition to critical care monitors for premature infants. The neonatal monitoring market represented the majority of the total fetal and neonatal monitoring market. Neonatal monitoring is driven by the demand for high cost continuous critical care monitoring in any hospital with a maternity ward or neonatal intensive care unit (NICU). Fetal monitoring encompassed the remainder of the market and is driven by increased public awareness of technology for monitoring the development of a fetus. Over the forecast period the neonatal monitoring segment is expected to account for a growing percentage of the total market. This subtle shift may be attributed to a tendency for hospitals to invest in fetal monitors featuring improved, albeit more expensive, wireless connectivity options among other updated features. By 2023, however, the revenue mix will stabilize and only nominal fluctuations are expected in the long-term. Growth in these mature markets is generally minimal considering that equipment is usually purchased on a replacement basis. In recent years, however, hospitals have begun to purchase equipment that can be integrated with their hospital information systems in order to foster improved clinical workflow. Consequently, as hospitals continue to replace their monitors, they will instead opt for more advanced devices with updated features, such as wireless patient connectivity and device networking capabilities. This trend will help to stabilize the market for fetal and neonatal monitors over the forecast period. For more information about this report visit http://www.researchandmarkets.com/research/3bg2gc/south_korea


News Article | May 25, 2017
Site: www.marketwired.com

Awarding outstanding examples of technology innovation in the life sciences, from basic R&D to translational medicine since 2003 NEEDHAM, MA--(Marketwired - May 25, 2017) - Bio-IT World has announced the winners of the 2017 Best Practices Awards this morning at the Bio-IT World Conference and Expo in Boston, MA. Entries from Maccabi Healthcare System, Rady Children's Institute for Genomic Medicine, Allotrope Foundation, Earlham Institute, Biomedical Imaging Research Services Section (BIRSS), and Alexion Pharmaceuticals were honored. Since 2003, the Bio-IT World Best Practices Awards has honored excellence in bioinformatics, basic and clinical research, and IT frameworks for biology and drug discovery. Winners were chosen in four categories, and two discretionary awards this year as well. "Looking back at the fourteen years since our first Best Practices competition, I am amazed by how far the bio-IT field has come. I continue to be inspired by the work done in our field," said Bio-IT World Editor Allison Proffitt. "The Bio-IT World Community is increasingly open, and the partnerships and projects showcased here prove our dedication to collaborative excellence." Bio-IT World debuted the Best Practices Awards at the second Bio-IT World Conference & Expo in 2003, hoping to not only elevate the critical role of information technology in modern biomedical research, but also to highlight platforms and strategies that could be widely shared across the industry to improve the quality, pace, and reach of science. In the years since, hundreds of projects have been entered in the annual competition, and over 80 prizes have been given out to the most outstanding entries. This year, a panel of eleven invited expert judges joined the Bio-IT World editors in reviewing detailed submissions from pharmaceutical companies, academic centers, government agencies, and technology providers. The awards ceremony was held at the Seaport World Trade Center in Boston, where the winning teams received their prizes from Proffitt, veteran judge Chris Dwan, and Philips Kuhl, president of conference organizer Cambridge Healthtech Institute. In October 2015, Maccabi Healthcare System joined forces with Medial EarlySign to implement advanced AI and machine learning algorithms to uncover the "hidden" signals within electronic medical records (EMRs) and identify unscreened individuals at high risk of harboring Colorectal Cancer. The system used existing EMR Data only, including routine blood counts. ColonFlag evaluated nearly 80,000 outpatient blood count tests results collected over one year, and flagged 690 individuals (approximately 1%) as highest risk population for further evaluation. Of those, 220 colonoscopies were performed, of which 42% had findings including 20 cancers (10%). Precision medicine for newborns by 26-hour Whole Genome Sequencing Genetic diseases, of which there are more than 5,000, are the leading cause of death in infants, especially in Neonatal Intensive Care Units (NICU) and Pediatric Intensive Care Units (PICU). The gateway to precision medicine and improved outcomes in NICUs/PICUs is a rapid genetic diagnosis. Diagnosis by standard methods, including whole genome sequencing (WGS), is too slow to guide NICU/PICU management. Edico Genome, Rady Children's Institute for Genomic Medicine, and Illumina have developed scalable infrastructure to enable widespread deployment of ultra-rapid diagnosis of genetic diseases in NICUs and PICUs. First described in "A 26-hour system of highly sensitive WGS for emergency management of genetic diseases" in September 2015, we have now improved and implemented this infrastructure at Rady Children's Hospital (RCH). Among the first 48 RCH infants tested, 23 received diagnoses and 16 had a substantial change in NICU/PICU treatment. We are currently equipping other children's hospitals to emulate these results. The Allotrope Framework: A holistic set of capabilities to improve data access, interoperability and integrity through standardization, and enable data-driven innovation The Allotrope Framework is comprised of a technique-, vendor-, and platform-independent file format for data and contextual metadata (with class libraries to ensure consistent implementation); Taxonomies and Ontologies- an extensible basis of a controlled vocabulary to unambiguously describe and structure metadata; and Data Models that describe the structure of the data. Member companies, collaborating with vendor partners, have begun to demonstrate how the Framework enables cross-platform data transfer, facilitates finding, accessing and sharing data, and enables increased automation in laboratory data flow with a reduced need for error-prone manual input. The first production release is available to members and partners (as of Q4 2015), and phased public releases of the framework components will become available beginning mid-2017. Improving Global Food Security and Sustainability By Applying High-Performance Computing To Unlock The Complex Bread Wheat Genome One of the most important global challenges to face humanity will be the obligation to feed a world population of approximately nine billion people by 2050. Wheat is grown on the largest area of land of any crop at over 225 million hectares, and over two billion people worldwide are dependent on this crop as their daily staple diet. Unfortunately, the six primary crop species see up to 40% loss in yield due to plant disease. Furthermore, a changing climate, increased degradation in arable land, reduction in biodiversity through rainforest destruction, and increasing sea levels all contribute to declining crop yields that greatly undermines global food security and sustainability. A solution to this grand challenge is to unlock the complex genomics of important crops, such as bread wheat, to identify the genes that underlie resistance to disease and environmental factors. One of the toughest crops to tackle, bread wheat has a hugely complex genome and is five times bigger than the human genome, with 17 billion base pairs of DNA. By exploiting leading-edge HPC infrastructure deployed at the Earlham Institute (EI), scientists have now assembled the genomic blueprint of the bread wheat genome for the very first time. By analyzing this wheat assembly, breeders worldwide can now begin to explore new variations of wheat that exhibit the very traits that will help improve its durability in the face of dogged disease and climate change. The Biomedical Research Informatics Computing System (BRICS) is a dynamic, expanding, and easily reproducible informatics ecosystem developed to create secure, centralized biomedical databases to support research efforts to accelerate scientific discovery, by aggregating and sharing data using Web-based clinical report form generators and a data dictionary of Clinical Data Elements. Effective sharing of data is a fundamental attribute in this new era of data informatics. Such informatics advances create both technical and political challenges to efficiently and effectively use biomedical resources. Designed to be initially un-branded and not associated with a particular disease, BRICS has been used so far to support multiple neurobiological studies, including the Federal Interagency Traumatic Brain Injury Research (FITBIR) program, the Parkinson's Disease Biomarkers Program (PDBP), and the National Ophthalmic Disease Genotyping and Phenotyping Network (eyeGENE). Supporting the storage of phenotypic, imaging, neuropathological, and genomics data, the BRICS instances currently have more than 31,500 subjects. The Alexion Insight (AI) Engine is a decision support system that provides senior executives and corporate planning staff answers to business and scientific questions across a landscape of approximately 9,000 rare diseases. The AI Engine filters and sorts across key criteria such as prevalence, clinical trials, severity, and onset to prioritize in real-time diseases of interest for targets, line extensions, and business development activity. Over a period of two years Alexion worked with EPAM to develop the AI Engine. The system integrates data from several external data sources into a cloud-based, Semantic Web database. Gaps and errors in publicly available data were filled and corrected by a team of expert curators. The engine supports an interactive, web-based interface presenting the rare disease landscape. The AI Engine has reduced the amount of time required to produce recommendations to senior management on promising disease candidates from a few months to mere minutes. About Bio-IT World (www.Bio-ITWorld.com) Part of Healthtech Publishing, Bio-IT World provides outstanding coverage of cutting-edge trends and technologies that impact the management and analysis of life sciences data, including next-generation sequencing, drug discovery, predictive and systems biology, informatics tools, clinical trials, and personalized medicine. Through a variety of sources including, Bio-ITWorld.com, Weekly Update Newsletter and the Bio-IT World News Bulletins, Bio-IT World is a leading source of news and opinion on technology and strategic innovation in the life sciences, including drug discovery and development. About Cambridge Healthtech Institute (www.healthtech.com) Cambridge Healthtech Institute (CHI), a division of Cambridge Innovation Institute, is the preeminent life science network for leading researchers and business experts from top pharmaceutical, biotech, CROs, academia, and niche service providers. CHI is renowned for its vast conference portfolio held worldwide including PepTalk, Molecular Medicine Tri-Conference, SCOPE Summit, Bio-IT World Conference & Expo, PEGS Summit, Drug Discovery Chemistry, Biomarker World Congress, World Preclinical Congress, Next Generation Dx Summit and Discovery on Target. CHI's portfolio of products include Cambridge Healthtech Institute Conferences, Barnett International, Insight Pharma Reports, Cambridge Marketing Consultants, Cambridge Meeting Planners, Knowledge Foundation Bio-IT World, Clinical Informatics News and Diagnostics World.


DUARTE, CA--(Marketwired - May 25, 2017) - Prolacta Bioscience®, the pioneer in human milk-based neonatal nutritional products for premature infants, announced today that it passed the halfway point in a clinical trial evaluating the effect of adding Prolact CR®, a caloric fortifier made from 100 percent human milk cream, to an exclusive human milk-based diet (EHMD)1 for very low birth weight (VLBW) premature infants. The study is evaluating the length of stay and incidence of bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD) and has enrolled 127 of the 210 participants weighing between 500 and 1,250g (1 lb 1 oz to 2 lbs 12 oz). The randomized controlled study is evaluating whether adding the human milk cream-based caloric fortifier can decrease the length of hospital stay and reduce BPD, a form of debilitating chronic lung disease not uncommon in VLBW babies. The milk cream caloric fortifier is added as a supplement to an EHMD, which includes the use of 100 percent human milk-based fortifier Prolact+ H2MF®, and is the recommended diet for VLBW infants. "Due to the increased energy and macronutrient requirements of VLBW infants in general, and those with BPD in particular, unfortified human milk does not meet their nutritional needs," said Amy Hair, M.D., lead investigator, Assistant Professor of Pediatrics at Baylor College of Medicine, and the Director of Neonatal Nutrition at Texas Children's Hospital. "VLBW infants require 20 to 40 percent more calories than their age-matched counterparts. These infants also are at higher risk for postnatal growth failure due to disruptions in their feeding regimens. An earlier randomized clinical trial looking at growth suggested that Prolact CR® reduced the incidence and severity of BPD in the group receiving additional nutrients provided from fat." The study, "A Randomized Trial of the Use of Human Milk Cream to Decrease Length of Stay in Extremely Premature Infants," is currently being conducted at Akron Children's Hospital at Boardman, Boardman, Ohio (Linda Cooper, M.D.); Innsbruck Medical University, Innsbruck, Austria (Ursula Kiechl-Kohlendorfer, M.D.); Michigan State University-Sparrow Hospital, Lansing, Mich. (Padmani Karna, M.D.); University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio, San Antonio, Texas (Cynthia Blanco, M.D.); Winnie Palmer Hospital for Women & Babies, Orlando, Fla. (Jose Perez, M.D.); Wasatch Neonatal LC, Orem, Utah (Dale Gerstmann, M.D.); St. Joseph's Women's Hospital, Tampa, Fla. (Jenelle Ferry, M.D.); St. John Medical Center, Tulsa, Okla. (Craig Anderson, D.O.); Cook Children's Medical Center, Fort Worth, Texas (David Riley, M.D.); St. Louis Children's Hospital, St. Louis, Mo. (Stephanie Attarian, M.D.); The University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center, Oklahoma City, Okla. (Andrea Willeitner, M.D.); and Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center El Paso, El Paso, Texas (Lewis Rubin, M.D.). "This clinical trial is the result of secondary findings that were observed in an earlier trial, and underscores the need for continued study of the unique properties in human milk," said Scott Elster, CEO of Prolacta. "We look forward to seeing how Prolact CR® affects lengths of stay and BPD with the hope of uncovering new therapeutic benefits for this fragile patient population." This new clinical trial seeks to verify observations on length of stay and BPD with the use of Prolact CR® from a prior multi-center, randomized trial ("Premature Infants 750-1,250g Birth Weight Supplemented with a Novel Human Milk-Derived Cream are Discharged Sooner," published in Breastfeeding Medicine in 2016). This analysis found that infants who received Prolact CR® were discharged, on average, 12 days earlier than those who did not receive the cream supplement. In the initial trial, infants who developed BPD may have derived an even greater benefit, a finding which prompted this new study. About Prolacta Bioscience Prolacta Bioscience, Inc. is a privately-held life sciences company dedicated to Advancing the Science of Human Milk®. The company pioneered the development of human milk-based neonatal nutritional products to meet the needs of critically ill, premature infants in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU). Prolacta leads the industry in the quality and safety of nutritional products made from donor breast milk, and operates the first and only pharmaceutical-grade manufacturing facility for the processing of human milk. 1 An EHMD is when 100% percent of the protein, fat and carbohydrates in an infant's intake are derived solely from human milk.


News Article | May 25, 2017
Site: news.yahoo.com

They're going to need their own bus. After trying for nearly two decades to have a baby, a Virginia couple now has six of them — three girls and three boys, the first sextuplets ever delivered at Children's Hospital of Richmond. Read: Days of Our Fives: Parents of All-Girl Quintuplets Discuss Challenges of Raising So Many Babies Aideboye and Ajibola Taiwo welcomed their half dozen offspring on May 11, attended by a 40-person medical team. The babies were delivered by Cesarean section at 30 weeks. They range in weight from one pound, 10 ounces to two pounds, 15 ounces. All are doing well in the medical center’s neonatal intensive care unit. The couple, who hail from Nigeria, heard four heartbeats at their first ultra sound in November. But when the mother began receiving health care at the children’s hospital in January, the parents-to-be were told there were actually six heartbeats. “I was excited,” the new father said. “For the first very first time, we were expecting." Read: Quadruplet Brothers All Get Accepted to Elite Colleges, Including Harvard and Yale And there was a lot to expect. Doctors, nurses, and other medical staff ran practice drills for the spontaneous arrival of six premature babies. “We’re going through this extraordinary journey together with the family,” said Dr. Ronald Ramus, the hospital’s director of maternal and fetal medicine. "It’s not every day that parents bring home sextuplets. Mrs. Taiwo was eating, sleeping and breathing for seven.” The babies’ father said, “We are far from home but the medical team is our family. That is what got us this far.” The parents are now visiting their brood in the NICU, holding them in skin-to-skin chest embraces that remind them of being in the womb and bonding them with their mom and dad. Watch: Couple Welcomes Quadruplets After Struggling to Conceive for Years


The March of Dimes and Saint Luke's worked with mom photographers – some whose children had previously been in the NICU – to document the sweet bonding sessions, gifting the keepsake photos to families. "Mother's Day – especially a mom's very first with her new baby – can be hard for many families with children in the NICU," says March of Dimes president Stacey D. Stewart. "Our NICU Family Support program works with Saint Luke's Hospital and more than 100 other hospitals around the United States to offer the support families need to have the best possible experience when their baby is in the NICU. From providing the chance to build a loving bond by using the sense of touch with kangaroo care, to commemorating milestones like Mother's Day, the March of Dimes is proud to partner with hospitals like St. Luke's to give every baby and every family a healthy, loving start." To view and share these intimate Mother's Day photos and video, click here. All photos should be dual credited to March of Dimes and the photographer whose name is watermarked in each photo.  Video is to be credited to Saint Luke's Hospital of Kansas City. The March of Dimes NICU Family Support Program® at Saint Luke's Hospital supports moms who are on bed rest and at the bedside with premature or critically ill children in the NICU. The program also educates NICU staff about the best ways to support babies, families and each other. Babies born premature (before 37 weeks of pregnancy), even born just a few weeks too soon, can face serious health challenges and are at risk for lifelong disabilities including breathing problems, vision loss, cerebral palsy, and intellectual delays. In the United States, about 380,000 babies are born too soon each year – that's 1 in 10. The premature birth rate in our country is higher than that in most other high-resource nations. The March of Dimes is supporting cutting-edge research at a nationwide network of five Prematurity Research Centers, where about 200 of the brightest minds are collaborating to create major breakthroughs in prematurity. By working together, March of Dimes-funded scientists and researchers are finding answers to the unknown causes of premature birth. Saint Luke's will also host a kangaroo-a-thon May 9-14, 2017 encouraging time spent with mom and baby enjoying skin-to-skin contact and supported by Saint Luke's NICU staff. Kangaroo care has documented benefits for both parent and baby. Benefits for baby include: It can also be beneficial for mom: Saint Luke's hospitals deliver more than 6,000 babies every year.  Saint Luke's offers the most advanced expertise and services to expectant mothers and their babies. Saint Luke's NICUs offer advanced care for premature babies and infants requiring critical care. We utilize a team of experts, including neonatologists, lactation consultants, nutritionists and nurses to care for moms on bed rest, as well as NICU and full-term babies, with care tailored to each baby's unique needs. March of Dimes is the leading nonprofit organization for pregnancy and baby health. For more than 75 years, moms and babies have benefited from March of Dimes research, education, vaccines, and breakthroughs. For the latest resources and health information, visit marchofdimes.org and nacersano.org. You can also find us on Facebook or follow us on Instagram and Twitter. To view the original version on PR Newswire, visit:http://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/nicu-moms-and-babies-celebrate-mothers-day-with-intimate-and-beneficial-skin-to-skin-kangaroo-care-bonding-300456164.html


"This is incredibly important work," added Deb Krmpotic, chief executive officer of Banner Thunderbird. "The closer to full-term that a baby can deliver, the better it is for the baby, so we're incredibly pleased to see these kind of results from our combined efforts." Dr. Gunatilake became the medical director of the MFM Program at Banner Thunderbird in July, and immediately began using methods pioneered by Dr. John Elliott, a national MFM expert in reducing pre-term delivery. "We worked collaboratively with the team at Banner Thunderbird to train them on implementing our protocols," said Dr. Gunatilake. "We couldn't be more pleased with the achievement of this milestone for mothers and babies." The chances of pre-term delivery can sometimes be hard to predict, but women with certain infections, shortened cervix, or those with a history of pre-term delivery are at greater risk. "Our team helps high-risk expectant mothers achieve the best possible outcome," said Dr. John Elliott, medical director of Valley Perinatal Services. "The fact that we can help so many mothers, who come to us scared and with little hope, speaks to the effectiveness of our program." Dr. Elliott founded Valley Perinatal Services in 2013. Dr. Gunatilake joined in May 2015 after serving as medical director of Obstetrical Services at the University of Oklahoma where he was recognized for improving obstetrical quality and safety. Dr. Gunatilake views the nine months of pregnancy as the "window of opportunity" for mothers to positively impact their babies. Banner Thunderbird Medical Center in Glendale, Arizona, specializes in heart care, surgical services, obstetrics and gynecology, emergency care, behavioral health, cancer care, rehabilitation and pediatrics including the West Valley's only pediatric intensive care unit, pediatric Emergency department and Level III neonatal intensive care unit. The hospital is part of Banner Health, a nonprofit health system with 28 hospitals in six states. For more information, please visit www.BannerHealth.com/Thunderbird. Valley Perinatal is a maternal-fetal medicine practice dedicated to reducing pre-term delivery and creating the best possible outcomes for high-risk expectant mothers. Directed by industry pioneer, Dr. John Elliott, and staffed by experienced maternal-fetal medicine specialists, nurse practitioners, and ultrasound sonographers, Valley Perinatal cares for pregnant women with complications, co-managing them alongside their obstetricians. This approach has led to higher gestational ages and decreased NICU admissions and durations for babies. Valley Perinatal provides genetic counseling, fetal therapy, in-utero procedures, obstetric ultrasound and diagnostics. Obstetricians trust Valley to coach them with their high-risk pregnancies to a successful outcome. Visit www.valleyperinatal.com. To view the original version on PR Newswire, visit:http://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/valley-perinatal-services-and-banner-thunderbird-medical-center-significantly-lowering-extreme-pre-term-births-at-hospital-300456550.html


News Article | February 15, 2017
Site: www.prweb.com

The National Association of Professional Women (NAPW) honors Rita Kluny as a 2016-2017 inductee into its VIP Woman of the Year Circle. She is recognized with this prestigious distinction for leadership in holistic healing. NAPW is the nation’s leading networking organization exclusively for professional women, boasting more than 850,000 members, a thriving eChapter and over 200 operating Local Chapters. “I’m pleased to welcome Rita into this exceptional group of professional women,” said NAPW President Star Jones. “Her knowledge and experience in her industry are valuable assets to her company and community.” Rita Kluny saved lives in the NICU, but there was an emotional disconnect. She explored other venues of healing and came across the American Holistic Nurses Association, becoming certified in Holistic Nursing, and Healing Touch. It is an energy-based therapy that promotes harmony and balance to accelerate one’s own healing process. She brought traditional nursing and the healing arts together to create a venue in which caretakers can better care for their babies. As a Healing Touch practitioner and instructor since 1993, Ms. Kluny started Healing Touch for Babies in 2000 and helps children and mothers all over the country. “I have a keen intuitive sense of where moms are coming from and what they need to hear to be able to move forward as they transition into motherhood,” Ms. Kluny said. To her, education is the key. With her guidance and practice, families can create the lives they want, and the quality time to go with it. Teaching those who are afraid of this unfamiliar style of medicine, love and showing the way to a new beginning makes it all worthwhile for Ms. Kluny. In the future, she hopes to create a radio show to interview experts about conscious pregnancy, birthing and parenting support. AboutNAPW NAPW’s mission is to provide an exclusive, highly advanced networking forum to successful women executives, professionals and entrepreneurs where they can aspire, connect and achieve. Through innovative resources, unique tools and progressive benefits, professional women interact, exchange ideas, advance their knowledge and empower each other.

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