Dudley, MA, United States
Dudley, MA, United States

Nichols College is a private, four-year private, not-for-profit, coeducational college located in Dudley, Massachusetts. Founded in 1815 as Nichols Academy, the school has a long history in Massachusetts. Nichols’ mission is to transform today’s students into tomorrow’s leaders through a dynamic, career-focused business and professional education. Nichols offers twelve specializations in its business program, five majors in its liberal arts program, and an Educator Preparation Program for middle and secondary education. The College offers associate’s, bachelor’s, and master’s degrees as well as certificate programs. Wikipedia.

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News Article | November 29, 2016
Site: news.yahoo.com

An Antarctic mountain with a unique, pyramid-like shape is suddenly internet-famous, with countless theorists contemplating its origin. Some are wondering whether an ancient civilization created the rocky, pyramidal structure, and others are pointing toward outer space, speculating about the involvement of aliens. But Occam's razor — the idea that the simplest explanation is usually the right one — points to a far more mundane cause: Those steep, pyramid-like sides are likely the work of hundreds of millions of years of erosion, experts told Live Science. "This is just a mountain that looks like a pyramid," Eric Rignot, a professor of Earth system science at the University of California, Irvine, told Live Science in an email. "Pyramid shapes are not impossible — many peaks partially look like pyramids, but they only have one to two faces like that, rarely four." [Photos: The World's Weirdest Geological Formations] The pyramidal mountain, which doesn't have a formal name, is one of the many peaks that make up Antarctica's Ellsworth Mountains, which were discovered by the American aviator Lincoln Ellsworth during a flight on Nov. 23, 1935, according to a 2007 research paper that was published by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS). More specifically, the unnamed mountain — located at 79°58’39.25"S 81°57’32.21"W — is in the southern part of the Ellsworth Mountains in an area called Heritage Range, which is known for its extraordinary fossils, including those of Cambrian-period trilobites from more than 500 million years ago, according to a 1972 USGS report. The mountain isn't that tall by planetary standards — just 4,150 feet (1,265 meters) — or a little less than one-fifth the height of Denali, the tallest mountain in North America, according to Google Earth. The mountain may not have Denali's height, but its unique pyramidal shape sets it apart, said Mauri Pelto, a professor of environmental science at Nichols College in Dudley, Massachusetts. Freeze-thaw erosion likely led to its pyramid-like shape, Pelto said. This happens when snow or water fills up cracks within a mountain during the day. When night falls and temperatures drop, the snow freezes and expands, turning into ice. The expanding ice causes the cracks to grow, Pelto said. This freeze-thaw erosion happens countless times, leading to the creation of larger cracks that can, eventually, cause entire rock sections to break off, he said. These forces likely also shaped other pyramidal mountains, including the Matterhorn in the Alps, he said. Three of the mountain's four sides appear to have eroded at about the same rate. "It suggests, since it came out so evenly, that the rock type is fairly uniform," Pelto said. "You don't have any rock layers that are harder to erode." In other words, the nameless mountain is likely "all in one rock layer," Pelto said. "It's not a very big mountain, so it's not that surprising." However, the eastern ridge of the mountain is decidedly the black sheep of the family. Instead of descending downward like the other ridges, that fourth side extends east, rising toward even higher terrain, Pelto said. "The erosion probably wasn't as uniform [on the eastern side]," he said. Pelto added that although some news outlets are saying that the mountain is newly discovered, that's very unlikely to be the case. There's a research base for climate scientists to the south of the mountain in an area known as the Patriot Hills. "You can actually probably see this mountain from up there in the Patriot Hills," Pelto said. As for the conspiracy theorists who are wondering about the mountain's pyramidal shape, "at least they're thinking about something," he said. "In the end, maybe they'll learn something in the process."


PAXTON, MA, December 21, 2016-- Dr. Edward Clarke has been included in Marquis Who's Who. As in all Marquis Who's Who biographical volumes, individuals profiled are selected on the basis of current reference value. Factors such as position, noteworthy accomplishments, visibility, and prominence in a field are all taken into account during the selection process.Recognized for more than six and a half decades of invaluable contributions to his field, Dr. Clarke parlays his extensive knowledge into his role as lecturer on science and semiconductors following his retirement from Worcester Polytechnic Institute as Professor Emeritus in 1995. Prior to entering the fledgling semiconductor industry in 1950, he earned a Bachelor of Science in Engineering from Brown University, served in the United States Navy during World War II, received a Master of Science in Applied Physics as well as a Master of Engineering Science from Harvard University. He received his Ph.D. from Brown in 1951. He served as a member of the technical staff and briefly as group head for semiconductors at Sylvania Electric Products Co. from 1950 until 1956. After leaving Sylvania he worked for three years as group head for research while helping to create the Sperry Semiconductor Division of the Sperry Rand Corporation. For the following six years, Dr. Clarke helped to create National Semiconductor Corporation, serving as vice president of operations and as a director of the company. He began with Worcester Polytechnic Institute back in 1965 when he started as an associate dean of the faculty and director of research, later becoming associate dean of graduate studies and professor of engineering and sciences. He also created and directed the Center for Solar Electrification, established primarily for WPI's pioneering undergraduate projects program. As Professor Emeritus, Dr. Clarke continued to assist WPI in its projects program.Dr. Clarke also served as an advisory council member of the Robert C. Fischer Institute for Policy and Culture of Nichols College, and served as a guest lecturer at Nichols. Dr. Clarke also served as a guest lecturer at Brown University. As a member of the IEEE, American Physical Society, Tau Beta Pi, and Sigma Xi, he has achieved much throughout his long-standing career, including obtaining patents in semiconductor technology, helping to create the science of semiconductor surfaces, pioneering the development of solar-powered racing cars, and having his history recorded at the Center for History at the American Institute of Physics in 2010. Additionally, he has been featured in the 35th through 37th editions of Who's Who in Finance and Business, two issues of Who's Who in American Education, and five editions of Who's Who in Science and Engineering.Dr. Clarke was elected into the Inventors Hall of Fame (National Academy of Inventors) in March of 2016 for his semiconductor invention (Planar Double Diffused Transistor), filed in 1952, which was and is critical for the mass production of semiconductor chips for the electronics industry (patent number US 2793145 A) under the name, Method of Forming a Junction Transistor 1952. The patent was awarded in 1957, but was filed in 1952 as the first of its kind.About Marquis Who's Who :Since 1899, when A. N. Marquis printed the First Edition of Who's Who in America , Marquis Who's Who has chronicled the lives of the most accomplished individuals and innovators from every significant field of endeavor, including politics, business, medicine, law, education, art, religion and entertainment. Today, Who's Who in America remains an essential biographical source for thousands of researchers, journalists, librarians and executive search firms around the world. Marquis now publishes many Who's Who titles, including Who's Who in America , Who's Who in the World , Who's Who in American Law , Who's Who in Medicine and Healthcare , Who's Who in Science and Engineering , and Who's Who in Asia . Marquis publications may be visited at the official Marquis Who's Who website at www.marquiswhoswho.com


News Article | November 30, 2016
Site: www.24-7pressrelease.com

MUKILTEO, WA, November 30, 2016-- Annette M. Hamilton, President/CEO of Compass Accounting & Business Solutions, has been recognized by Worldwide Branding for showing dedication, leadership and excellence in accounting, tax and business consulting services.Ms. Hamilton has been making a name for herself in the business field for more than two decades. With outstanding interpersonal, relationship and team building skills, she is known for caring about her clients, her employees and people. Annette M. Hamilton always wanted to go into business, and after taking an accounting course in high school, she knew that she wanted to further her education in business and accounting. She went on to earn a Bachelor of Science in Business Administration (management, accounting, finance) from Nichols College in Massachusetts. During her junior year, she studied at the International College of London, Kensington. She completed advanced accounting postgraduate work to obtain qualifications to become a certified public accountant. Prior to starting her own business, Ms. Hamilton spent 15 years advancing her career in private and public companies. She has plans to write a book in the near future, however, her top priority has and always will be her 2 daughters. She belongs to: Association of Certified Fraud Examiners (ACFE), National Society of Accountants (NSA), WA Association of Accounting & Tax Professionals (WAATP) and is a Board Member (2017-2019) of National Association of Tax Professionals (NATP-WA) just to name a few.For more information about Compass Accounting & Business Solutions, please visit http://www.compass-accounting.com About Worldwide BrandingFor more than 15 years, Worldwide Branding has been the leading, one-stop-shop, personal branding company, in the United States and abroad. From writing professional biographies and press releases, to creating and driving Internet traffic to personal websites, our team of branding experts tailor each product specifically for our clients' needs. From health care to finance to education and law, our constituents represent every major industry and occupation, at all career levels.For more information, please visit http://www.worldwidebranding.com


Temperate alpine glacier survival is dependent on the consistent presence of an accumulation zone. Frequent low accumulation area ratio values, below 30%, indicate the lack of a consistent accumulation zone, which leads to substantial thinning of the glacier in the accumulation zone. This thinning is often evident from substantial marginal recession, emergence of new rock outcrops and surface elevation decline in the accumulation zone. In the North Cascades 9 of the 12 examined glaciers exhibit characteristics of substantial accumulation zone thinning; marginal recession or emergent bedrock areas in the accumulation zone. The longitudinal profile thinning factor, f, which is a measure of the ratio of thinning in the accumulation zone to that at the terminus, is above 0.6 for all glaciers exhibiting accumulation zone thinning characteristics. The ratio of accumulation zone thinning to cumulative mass balance is above 0.5 for glacier experiencing substantial accumulation zone thinning. Without a consistent accumulation zone these glaciers are forecast not to survive the current climate or future additional warming. The results vary considerably with adjacent glaciers having a different survival forecast. This emphasizes the danger of extrapolating survival from one glacier to the next.


On Taku Glacier, Alaska a combination of field observations of snow water equivalent (SWE) from snowpits and probing in the vicinity of the transient snowline (TSL) are used to quantify the mass balance gradient. The balance gradient derived from the TSL and SWE measured in snowpits at 1000 m from 1998-2010 ranges from 2.6-3.8 mm m -1. Probing transects from 950 m-1100 m directly measure SWE and yield a slightly higher balance gradient of 3.3-3.8 mm m -1. The TSL on Taku Glacier is identified in MODIS and Landsat 4 and 7 Thematic Mapper images for 31 dates during the 2004-2010 period to assess the consistency of its rate of rise and reliability in assessing ablation for mass balance assessment. For example, in 2010, the TSL was 750 m on 28 July, 800 m on 5 August, 875 m on 14 August, 925 m on 30 August, and 975 m on 20 September. The mean observed probing balance gradient was 3.3 mm m -1, combined with the TSL rise of 3.7 m day -1 yields an ablation rate of 12.2 mm day -1 from mid-July to mid-Sept, 2010. The TSL rise in the region from 750-1100 m on Taku Glacier during eleven periods each covering more than 14 days during the ablation season indicates a mean TSL rise of 3.7 m day -1, the rate of rise is relatively consistent ranging from 3.1 to 4.4 m day -1. This rate is useful for ascertaining the final ELA if images or observations are not available near the end of the ablation season. The mean ablation from 750-1100 m during the July-September period determined from the TSL rise and the observed balance gradient is 11-13 mm day -1 on Taku Glacier during the 2004-2010 period. The potential for providing an estimate of bn from TSL observations late in the melt season from satellite images combined with the frequent availability of such images provides a means for efficient mass balance assessment in many years and on many glaciers. © 2011 Author(s).


Pelto M.,Nichols College | Brown C.,Simon Fraser University
Hydrological Processes | Year: 2012

Mount Baker, North Cascades, WA, has a current glacierized area of 38.6km 2. From 1984 to 2010, the North Cascade Glacier Climate Project has monitored the annual mass balance (Ba), accumulation area ratio (AAR), terminus behaviour and longitudinal profiles of Mount Baker glaciers. The Ba on Rainbow, Easton and Sholes Glaciers from 1990 to 2010 averaged -0.52mw.e.a -1(ma -1). Terminus observations on nine principal Mount Baker glaciers, 1984-2009, indicate retreat ranging from 240 to 520m, with a mean of 370m or 14ma -1. AAR observations on Rainbow, Sholes and Easton Glaciers for 1990-2010 indicate a mean AAR of 0.55 and a steady state AAR of 0.65. A comparison of Ba and AAR on these three glaciers yields a relationship that is used in combination with AAR observations made on all Mount Baker glaciers during 7years to assess Mount Baker glacier mass balance. Utilizing the AAR-Ba relationship for the three glaciers yields a mean Ba of -0.55ma -1 for the 1990-2010 period, 0.03ma -1 higher than the measured mean Ba. The mean Ba based on the AAR-Ba relationship for the entire mountain from 1990 to 2010 is -0.57ma -1. The product of the mean observed mass balance gradient determined from 11000 surface mass balance measurements and glacier area in each 100-m elevation band on Mount Baker yields a Ba of -0.50ma -1 from 1990-2010 for the entire mountain. The median altitude of the three index glaciers is lower than that of all Mount Baker glaciers. Adjusting the balance gradient for this difference yields a mean Ba of -0.77ma -1 from 1990 to 2010. All but one estimate converge on a loss of -0.5ma -1 for Mount Baker from 1990 to 2010. This equates to an 11-m loss in glacier thickness, 12-20% of the entire 1990 volume of glaciers on Mount Baker. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.


Pelto M.S.,Nichols College
Hydrological Processes | Year: 2011

Glacier retreat and changes in summer runoff have been pronounced in the Skykomish River Basin, North Cascades, Washington from 1950 to 2009. An analysis comparing USGS streamflow records for the 1950-1985 to the 1985-2009 period indicates that during the recent period the Skykomish River summer streamflow (July-September) has declined 26% in the watershed, spring runoff (April-June) has declined 6%, while winter runoff (November-March) has increased 10%. The minimum mean monthly August discharge from 1928 to 2010 occurred in 2003 and 2005 when streamflow was 15·1 and 15·2 m3s-1, respectively. From 1929 to 1985, streamflow was less than 14 m3s-1 during the glacier melt season on a single day in 1951. From 1986 to 2007 there were 217 days with discharge below 14 m3s-1 with 9 periods lasting for 10 consecutive days. In the Skykomish River watershed from 1958 to 2009, glacier area declined from 3·8 to 2·1 km2. Columbia, Foss, Hinman and Lynch Glacier, the primary glaciers in the basin, declined in area by 10, 60, 90 and 35%, respectively, since 1958. Annual mass balance measurements completed from 1984 to 2009 on Columbia, Foss and Lynch Glacier indicate a mass loss of 13·1 m w.e. Despite 15% higher ablation rates during the 1985-2009 period, the 45% reduction in glacier area led to a 38% reduction in glacier runoff between 1958 and 2009. The 38% reduction in glacier runoff did not lead to a significant decline in the percentage summer runoff contributed by glaciers under average conditions; the contribution has remained in the range of 1-3% from July to September. The glacier runoff decline impacted river discharge only during low flow periods in August and September. In August 2003 and 2005, glacier ablation contributed 1·5-1·6 m3s-1 to total discharge, or 10-11% of August discharge. While declining glacier area in the region has and will lead to reduced glacier runoff and reduced late summer streamflow, it has limited impact on the Skykomish River except during periods of critically low flow, below 14 m3s-1 when glaciers currently contribute more than 10% of the streamflow. © 2011 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.


Pit C.,Nichols College
Food, Culture and Society | Year: 2014

This article presents the business strategies of restaurateur Ninfa Laurenzo, the first female entrepreneur of Mexican origin to become a millionaire in Houston, Texas. “Mama Ninfa,” as Houston’s public came to call her affectionately, redefined the Mexican restaurant scene both in Houston and throughout the state of Texas in the 1970s and 1980s. By offering new options to diners who had grown tired of traditional Tex-Mex food, Ninfa Laurenzo contributed to the ethnic diversification of America’s dinner table. This article examines how one widowed middle-aged businesswoman carefully crafted a public persona that projected culinary inventiveness, professionalism and family values. It also explores Ninfa’s success in selling supposedly authentic Mexican dishes to an Anglo clientele that, until then, had shunned food establishments located in the predominantly Mexican neighborhoods of Houston. Ninfa Laurenzo and her chain of “Ninfa’s” eateries revolutionized the Mexican restaurant scene in Houston and beyond by anticipating Anglo customers’ growing tastes for a multicultural dinner table. © Association for the Study of Food and Society 2014.


Trademark
Nichols College | Date: 2013-12-02

Paper goods and printed matter, namely, stickers, brochures, catalogs, and bulletins all in the field of college level education. Tote bags and backpacks. Clothing, namely, jackets, golf shirts, t-shirts, pants, sweatshirts, sweatpants, hats, warm ups, athletic uniforms. Educational services, namely, providing courses of instruction at the college level; Arranging and conducting athletic competitions at the college level.


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Trademark
Nichols College | Date: 2013-12-02

Paper goods and printed matter, namely, stickers, brochures, catalogs, and bulletins all in the field of college level education. Tote bags and backpacks. Clothing, namely, jackets, golf shirts, t-shirts, pants, sweatshirts, sweatpants, hats, warm ups, athletic uniforms. Educational services, namely, providing courses of instruction at the college level; Arranging and conducting athletic competitions at the college level.

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