NHS Coventry

Coventry, United Kingdom

NHS Coventry

Coventry, United Kingdom
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Bush K.,Royal Bournemouth and Christchurch Hospital | Thomas R.,Hospital of St Cross | Raymond N.T.,University of Warwick | Sankar S.,University of Warwick | Barker P.J.,NHS Coventry
Diabetes and Vascular Disease Research | Year: 2014

Attendance at diabetic retinopathy screening in minority ethnic groups, including the South Asian population, is known to be poor. We describe a cluster randomised controlled trial conducted in 10 general practitioner (GP) surgeries in Coventry, UK, during 2007 which aimed to evaluate the use of a Link Worker-delivered intervention to improve attendance. The intervention consisted of a simple telephone reminder with the main outcome measure being attendance at diabetic retinopathy screening. We found a statistically significant difference between mean attendance proportions for intervention (0.89) and control (0.74) practices: difference (95% confidence interval (CI)) 0.15 (0.04-0.27), t = 3.03, p = 0.0162; this difference remained significant when adjusted for previous year's proportions. In this proof-of-concept study, in inner city Coventry, we demonstrated increased attendance at diabetic retinopathy screening by use of a simple Link Worker-implemented telephone call intervention. The use of Link Worker phone calls may be a useful tool to increase attendance for diabetic retinopathy screening in a group with high did-not-attend (DNA) rates and a high prevalence of diabetic retinopathy and visual impairment. © The Author(s) 2014.


Harrell R.,NHS Coventry | Caley M.,NHS Warwickshire | Allwood D.,Kings Fund | Fowler T.,University of Birmingham
Journal of Public Health | Year: 2011

Background The UK government has proposed major changes to the Public Health system in England. This study aims quantify increasing anecdotal concern that the number of Public Health consultant posts advertised has plummeted since the publication of these plans. Methods The archives of BMJ careers were interrogated for hospital and Public Health consultant posts advertised October 2008 and May 2011. Statistical process control charts were used to compare differences in recruitment over time and the ratio of Public Health:hospital consultant posts. Results We found a highly significant reduction in the mean number of advertisements for Public Health consultant posts from 27.9 posts per month in the period October 2008-Novermber 2009 to 6.3 posts per month between December 2009 and May 2010 (P< 0.005). The ratio of Public Health:hospital consultant posts fell from 3.3 to 0.9 Public Health consultant posts per 100 hospital consultant posts (P< 0.005). Conclusions This study confirms the anecdotal concern that there has been a significant reduction in the advertisement, and by extrapolation, recruitment to Public Health consultants posts in England around the time of the publication of the governments reform plans. Public Health consultant posts have been disproportionately affected by this reduction compared to hospital consultant posts. © The Author 2011, Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Faculty of Public Health. All rights reserved.


PubMed | NHS Coventry
Type: Comparative Study | Journal: Journal of public health (Oxford, England) | Year: 2011

The UK government has proposed major changes to the Public Health system in England. This study aims quantify increasing anecdotal concern that the number of Public Health consultant posts advertised has plummeted since the publication of these plans.The archives of BMJ careers were interrogated for hospital and Public Health consultant posts advertised October 2008 and May 2011. Statistical process control charts were used to compare differences in recruitment over time and the ratio of Public Health:hospital consultant posts.We found a highly significant reduction in the mean number of advertisements for Public Health consultant posts from 27.9 posts per month in the period October 2008-Novermber 2009 to 6.3 posts per month between December 2009 and May 2010 (P< 0.005). The ratio of Public Health:hospital consultant posts fell from 3.3 to 0.9 Public Health consultant posts per 100 hospital consultant posts (P< 0.005).This study confirms the anecdotal concern that there has been a significant reduction in the advertisement, and by extrapolation, recruitment to Public Health consultants posts in England around the time of the publication of the governments reform plans. Public Health consultant posts have been disproportionately affected by this reduction compared to hospital consultant posts.

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