Foray Newfoundland and Labrador

Rocky Harbour, Canada

Foray Newfoundland and Labrador

Rocky Harbour, Canada
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Thorn R.G.,University of Western Ontario | Kim J.I.,University of Western Ontario | Kim J.I.,Ryerson University | Lebeuf R.,Rang du Rapide Nord | Voitk A.,Foray Newfoundland and Labrador
Botany | Year: 2017

Three species of golden chanterelles were found in Newfoundland and Labrador and were compared with other Cantharellus species by macromorphology, microscopy, and multilocus phylogenetic studies. The commonest species is a member of the C. cibarius group, usually found with Picea, and is differentiated from European C. cibarius by its pinkish-orange rather than yellow hymenium, and from both C. cibarius and C. roseocanus of the Pacific Northwest by its ITS and TEF1 sequences. We describe it as a new species, Cantharellus enelensis; published sequences extend its range to Michigan and Illinois. An uncommon species with reduced, merulioid hymenophore, found growing only with Betula, has rDNA and TEF1 sequences nearly identical to C. amethysteus, but only occasionally shows the amethyst scales on its cap characterizing that species in Europe. Ours is the first report of this species from North America. A third species was recognized by its sequences as C. camphoratus, but our collections, found with Abies balsamea, lack the odour of camphor for which this species was named and have longer and more slender spores than in the original description. This species has not been reported since its description from a single collection in Nova Scotia. All three species are edible. © 2017, Canadian Science Publishing. All rights reserved.


Ohenoja E.,University of Oulu | Wang Z.,Yale University | Townsend J.P.,Yale University | Mitchel D.,Northern Ireland Fungus Group NIFG | Voitk A.,Foray Newfoundland and Labrador
Mycologia | Year: 2010

Thuemenidium is a small earth tongue genus with three recognized white-spored species. Within Thuemenidium, T. atropurpureum and T. arenarium have been reported only from the northern hemisphere while T. berteroi is known solely in the southern hemisphere. We reviewed the ecology, examined the morphology and inferred the systematic positions of northern species of Thuemenidium from LSU-rDNA gene phylogeny of 48 taxa in Pezizomycotina including recent collections. Our results suggest that Thuemenidium in its current sense is polyphyletic and that T. atropurpureum, closely related to Microglossum and Leotia species, is a member of Leotiaceae (Helotiales, Leotiomycetes). Our phylogeny placed the other northern species, T. arenarium, in Geoglossaceae (Geoglossales, Geoglossomycetes), retaining genus Thuemenidium, pending further investigation. © 2010 by The Mycological Society of America.


Voitk A.,Foray Newfoundland and Labrador | Beug M.W.,Evergreen State College | O'Donnell K.,National United University | Burzynski M.,Foray Newfoundland and Labrador
Mycologia | Year: 2016

Morphological and molecular phylogenetic studies of true morels (Morchella) in the Canadian province of Newfoundland and Labrador resulted in the discovery of two undescribed species in the M. elata clade that we initially distinguished by the informal designations Mel-19 and Mel-36. The latter species, also collected in New Brunswick, Canada, is hitherto known only from the St Lawrence River Basin. Mel-36 is described here as a novel, phylogenetically distinct species, M. laurentiana. Before the discovery of Mel-19 in Newfoundland and Labrador, New Brunswick and Washington state it was only known from central China and central and northern Europe. Mel-19 is described here as a novel species, M. eohespera. © 2016 by The Mycological Society of America.

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