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Ramat Yishay, Israel

Ibdah M.,Israel Institute for Biological Research | Berim A.,Washington State University | Martens S.,Centro Ricerca e Innovazione | Valderrama A.L.H.,Centro Ricerca e Innovazione | And 3 more authors.
Phytochemistry | Year: 2014

The apple tree (Malus sp.) is an agriculturally and economically important source of food and beverages. Many of the health beneficial properties of apples are due to (poly)phenolic metabolites that they contain, including various dihydrochalcones. Although many of the genes and enzymes involved in polyphenol biosynthesis are known in many plant species, the specific reactions that lead to the biosynthesis of the dihydrochalcone precursor, p-dihydrocoumaroyl-CoA (3), are unknown. To identify genes involved in the synthesis of these metabolites, existing genome databases of the Rosaceae were screened for apple genes with significant sequence similarity to Arabidopsis alkenal double bond reductases. Herein described are the isolation and characterization of a Malus hydroxycinnamoyl-CoA double bond reductase, which catalyzed the NADPH-dependent reduction of p-coumaroyl-CoA and feruloyl-CoA to p-dihydrocoumaroyl-CoA and dihydroferuloyl-CoA, respectively. Its apparent Km values for p-coumaroyl-CoA, feruloyl-CoA and NADPH were 96.6, 92.9 and 101.3 μM, respectively. The Malus double bond reductase preferred feruloyl-CoA to p-coumaroyl-CoA as a substrate by a factor of 2.1 when comparing catalytic efficiencies in vitro. Expression analysis of the hydroxycinnamoyl-CoA double bond reductase gene revealed that its transcript levels showed significant variation in tissues of different developmental stages, but was expressed when expected for involvement in dihydrochalcone formation. Thus, the hydroxycinnamoyl-CoA double bond reductase appears to be responsible for the reduction of the α,β-unsaturated double bond of p-coumaroyl-CoA, the first step of dihydrochalcone biosynthesis in apple tissues, and may be involved in the production of these compounds. © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved. Source


Gonzalez F.,Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences | Tkaczuk C.,Siedlce University Of Natural Sciences And Humanities | Dinu M.M.,Research Development Institute for Plant Protection | Fiedler Z.,Institute of Plant Protection NRI | And 3 more authors.
Journal of Pest Science | Year: 2016

Biological pest control with mass-produced arthropod natural enemies is well developed in greenhouse crops and has often resulted in the evolution of complex ecosystems with persistent populations of multiple arthropod natural enemy species. However, there are cases where arthropod natural enemies are either not effective enough, not available, or their use is rather costly. For these reasons, biological control based on microorganisms, also referred to as ‘microbials’, represents a complementary strategy for further development. Although commercially available microbials have been around for quite some time, research on and the applied use of combinations of arthropod natural enemies and microbials have remained relatively under explored. Here, we review current uses of entomopathogenic fungi, bacteria and viruses, and their possible direct and indirect effects on arthropod natural enemies in European greenhouses. We discuss how microbials might be combined with arthropod natural enemies in the light of new methodologies and technologies such as conservation biological control, greenhouse climate management, and formulation and delivery. Furthermore, we explore the possibilities of using other microorganisms for biological control, such as endophytes, and the need to understand the effect of insect-associated microorganisms, or symbionts, on the success of biological control. Finally, we suggest future research directions to optimize the combined use of microbials and arthropod natural enemies in greenhouse production. © 2016 The Author(s) Source


Yahyaa M.,NeweYaar Research Center | Berim A.,Washington State University | Isaacson T.,NeweYaar Research Center | Marzouk S.,NeweYaar Research Center | And 4 more authors.
Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry | Year: 2015

Bay laurel (Laurus nobilis L.) is an agriculturally important tree used in food, drugs, and the cosmetics industry. Many of the health beneficial properties of bay laurel are due to volatile terpene metabolites that they contain, including various norisoprenoids. Despite their importance, little is known about the norisoprenoid biosynthesis in Laurus nobilis fruits. We found that the volatile norisoprenoids 6-methyl-5-hepten-2-one, pseudoionone, and β-ionone accumulated in Laurus nobilis fruits in a pattern reflecting their carotenoid content. A full-length cDNA encoding a potential carotenoid cleavage dioxygenase (LnCCD1) was isolated. The LnCCD1 gene was overexpressed in Escherichia coli, and recombinant protein was assayed for its cleavage activity with an array of carotenoid substrates. The LnCCD1 protein was able to cleave a variety of carotenoids at the 9,10 (9′,10′) and 5,6 (5′,6′) positions to produce 6-methyl-5-hepten-2-one, pseudoionone, β-ionone, and α-ionone. Our results suggest a role for LnCCD1 in Laurus nobilis fruit flavor biosynthesis. © 2015 American Chemical Society. Source


Ibdah M.,Washington State University | Ibdah M.,NeweYaar Research Center | Berim A.,Washington State University | Martens S.,Centro Ricerca e Innovazione | And 4 more authors.
Phytochemistry | Year: 2014

The apple tree (Malus sp.) is an agriculturally and economically important source of food and beverages. Many of the health beneficial properties of apples are due to (poly)phenolic metabolites that they contain, including various dihydrochalcones. Although many of the genes and enzymes involved in polyphenol biosynthesis are known in many plant species, the specific reactions that lead to the biosynthesis of the dihydrochalcone precursor, p-dihydrocoumaroyl-CoA (3), are unknown. To identify genes involved in the synthesis of these metabolites, existing genome databases of the Rosaceae were screened for apple genes with significant sequence similarity to Arabidopsis alkenal double bond reductases. Herein described are the isolation and characterization of a Malus hydroxycinnamoyl-CoA double bond reductase, which catalyzed the NADPH-dependent reduction of p-coumaroyl-CoA and feruloyl-CoA to p-dihydrocoumaroyl-CoA and dihydroferuloyl-CoA, respectively. Its apparent Km values for p-coumaroyl-CoA, feruloyl-CoA and NADPH were 96.6, 92.9 and 101.3 μM, respectively. The Malus double bond reductase preferred feruloyl-CoA to p-coumaroyl-CoA as a substrate by a factor of 2.1 when comparing catalytic efficiencies in vitro. Expression analysis of the hydroxycinnamoyl-CoA double bond reductase gene revealed that its transcript levels showed significant variation in tissues of different developmental stages, but was expressed when expected for involvement in dihydrochalcone formation. Thus, the hydroxycinnamoyl-CoA double bond reductase appears to be responsible for the reduction of the α,β-unsaturated double bond of p-coumaroyl-CoA, the first step of dihydrochalcone biosynthesis in apple tissues, and may be involved in the production of these compounds. ©2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved. Source


Aly R.,NeweYaar Research Center | Dubey N.K.,NeweYaar Research Center | Yahyaa M.,NeweYaar Research Center | Abu-Nassar J.,NeweYaar Research Center | Ibdah M.,NeweYaar Research Center
Plant Signaling and Behavior | Year: 2014

Strigolactones are phytohormones that stimulate seed germination of parasitic plants including Phelipanche aegyptiaca. Strigolactones are derived from carotenoids via a pathway involving the carotenoid cleavage dioxygenases CCD7 and CCD8. We report here identification of PaCCD7 and PaCCD8 orthologous genes from P. aegyptiaca. Expression analysis of PaCCD7 and PaCCD8 genes showed significant variation in their transcript levels in seeds and tubercles of P. aegyptiaca at different developmental stages. These two parasitic PaCCD7 and PaCCD8 genes were silenced in P. aegyptiaca using a trans-silencing approach in Nicotiana benthamiana. The transient knock-down of PaCCD7 and PaCCD8 inhibited tubercle development and the infestation process in host plants. Our results suggest an important role of the strigolactone associated genes (PaCCD7 and PaCCD8) in the parasite life cycle. © 2014 Landes Bioscience. Source

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