New Zealand Transport Agency

Napier, New Zealand

New Zealand Transport Agency

Napier, New Zealand
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Following the disastrous traffic congestion caused by unexpectedly high spectator numbers at the 2012 Royal New Zealand Air Force Air Show, organizers of the 2017 event knew they needed to avoid a repeat performance. Fortunately, BlipTrack technology was available to assist, ensuring far smooth traffic flow. Palmerston North, New Zealand, May 03, 2017 --( When the Royal New Zealand Air Force celebrated their 75th anniversary in 2012 with an air show, it turned into a gridlock nightmare, with interminable traffic queues weaving for miles, as 70,000 people flocked to the show. This year, with their 80th anniversary coming up, they wanted things to go smoothly and avoid another traffic chaos – in fact; it was an obligation for running the event again. The New Zealand Defense Force acknowledges that after the 2012 event, they needed help. “They learnt from 2012 that they are great at flying planes. They are not so great at putting on large events. The plan was to put on another airshow, but they knew that they had to get it right. They knew they had to change things,” said Event Organizer, Renee Barbour. Faced with the dual challenges of trying to ease traffic congestion and reduce the potential for massive gridlock, the event organizers commissioned consultancy service company Beca to provide detailed information on how traffic flowed around the Ohakea Air Base – which was also a major State Highway intersection. Together with the New Zealand Transport Agency and local councils and others, they worked out a traffic management plan. To help ease the traffic flow by providing spectators with live traffic updates, Beca deployed a network of BlipTrack sensors, produced by Denmark-based BLIP Systems. The solution, already implemented in numerous road networks all over New Zealand, Thailand, Sweden, Switzerland, Denmark and the UK, captures the point-to-point journey patterns and travel time of drivers in real-time, as they pass the sensors. The resulting traffic information could be communicated directly back to motorists in their cars, allowing them to make informed travel decisions, minimize frustration and stagger the continuous arrival of visitors. Both spectators and residents in surrounding neighborhoods were advised to check the transport agency's DriveLive web page for up-to-date information on delays, travel times and even alternative routes. Beca’s Project Manager, Richard Young, said, “Providing the Air Tattoo, NZTA and, most importantly, spectators with live and accurate travel information is a key way that we can ensure the event runs smoothly. We had a team working the weekend ready to react to any incident and provide the Air Tattoo team with all the traffic data they needed to keep roads moving. The road network was the busiest of the summer and thanks to using the BlipTrack system we were able to demonstrate that there were minimal delays caused by the Air Tattoo.” Behind the public DriveLive service, the event team had access to monitor the live traffic movements, so while spectators were enjoying the air display, the Air Tattoo team was working hard to ensure that the drive home was as stress-free as possible. The information was continuously updated, in line with the actual behavior of spectators to and from the show. So, when considering their route and time of departure, the motorists themselves were helping to reduce bottlenecks and keep the traffic moving. Spectators responded positively to the traffic management measures and reported smooth traffic flow to and from the show. BlipTrack is successfully employed in optimisation efforts in more than 25 international airports, including Amsterdam’s Schiphzl Airport, New York’s JFK, Copenhagen, Oslo, Manchester, Dublin, Brussels, Geneva, San Diego, Keflavik and Edinburgh. In recent years, the solution has been rolled out in train stations, ports, ski resorts, amusement parks and at global events. Palmerston North, New Zealand, May 03, 2017 --( PR.com )-- We all know the frustration of traveling to and from major events, and how the increased travel time and lengthy queues can affect the overall mood in the car.When the Royal New Zealand Air Force celebrated their 75th anniversary in 2012 with an air show, it turned into a gridlock nightmare, with interminable traffic queues weaving for miles, as 70,000 people flocked to the show. This year, with their 80th anniversary coming up, they wanted things to go smoothly and avoid another traffic chaos – in fact; it was an obligation for running the event again.The New Zealand Defense Force acknowledges that after the 2012 event, they needed help. “They learnt from 2012 that they are great at flying planes. They are not so great at putting on large events. The plan was to put on another airshow, but they knew that they had to get it right. They knew they had to change things,” said Event Organizer, Renee Barbour.Faced with the dual challenges of trying to ease traffic congestion and reduce the potential for massive gridlock, the event organizers commissioned consultancy service company Beca to provide detailed information on how traffic flowed around the Ohakea Air Base – which was also a major State Highway intersection. Together with the New Zealand Transport Agency and local councils and others, they worked out a traffic management plan.To help ease the traffic flow by providing spectators with live traffic updates, Beca deployed a network of BlipTrack sensors, produced by Denmark-based BLIP Systems. The solution, already implemented in numerous road networks all over New Zealand, Thailand, Sweden, Switzerland, Denmark and the UK, captures the point-to-point journey patterns and travel time of drivers in real-time, as they pass the sensors.The resulting traffic information could be communicated directly back to motorists in their cars, allowing them to make informed travel decisions, minimize frustration and stagger the continuous arrival of visitors. Both spectators and residents in surrounding neighborhoods were advised to check the transport agency's DriveLive web page for up-to-date information on delays, travel times and even alternative routes.Beca’s Project Manager, Richard Young, said, “Providing the Air Tattoo, NZTA and, most importantly, spectators with live and accurate travel information is a key way that we can ensure the event runs smoothly. We had a team working the weekend ready to react to any incident and provide the Air Tattoo team with all the traffic data they needed to keep roads moving. The road network was the busiest of the summer and thanks to using the BlipTrack system we were able to demonstrate that there were minimal delays caused by the Air Tattoo.”Behind the public DriveLive service, the event team had access to monitor the live traffic movements, so while spectators were enjoying the air display, the Air Tattoo team was working hard to ensure that the drive home was as stress-free as possible.The information was continuously updated, in line with the actual behavior of spectators to and from the show. So, when considering their route and time of departure, the motorists themselves were helping to reduce bottlenecks and keep the traffic moving.Spectators responded positively to the traffic management measures and reported smooth traffic flow to and from the show.BlipTrack is successfully employed in optimisation efforts in more than 25 international airports, including Amsterdam’s Schiphzl Airport, New York’s JFK, Copenhagen, Oslo, Manchester, Dublin, Brussels, Geneva, San Diego, Keflavik and Edinburgh. In recent years, the solution has been rolled out in train stations, ports, ski resorts, amusement parks and at global events. Click here to view the list of recent Press Releases from BLIP Systems


Van Blerk P.G.L.,New Zealand Transport Agency | Fletcher E.,AECOM Technology Corporation | Costello S.B.,University of Auckland | Henning T.F.P.,University of Auckland
Transportation Research Record | Year: 2017

Ethylene glycol has been used extensively by the concrete and road construction industries to identify rock durability issues associated with smectite clay minerals. The presence of these clay minerals is synonymous with rock degradation under normal environmental wetting and drying cycles. However, such historical test methods are predominately based on a subjective visual interpretation, describing the observed degradation of individual rock pieces at fixed time intervals during the soaking process. In addition, some test methods include complex equations with multiple weighting factors applied to nominated degradation descriptors (e.g., spalling, fracture, and disintegration) used to calculate a single durability indicator. This paper describes the development and implementation of an alternative, nonsubjective accelerated weathering test that also uses ethylene glycol. The research included metamor-phic and volcanic rock types used extensively in New Zealand for road construction. The greatest benefit of the proposed new test method is the ability to eliminate the subjective visual assessment described in historical test methods and adequately quantify results to specify contractual acceptance and rejection criteria. The test method also shows that good repeatability is possible from duplicate test samples. However, rock quality and quarry production consistency will influence the ability of the test method to report the same "percentage change in fines" over a prolonged test period. This phenomenon was particularly evident with problematic and lower quality rock. The test findings are well supported by observed field performance, thus giving confidence in the new method's usefulness.


Davies A.J.,University of Canterbury | Sadashiva V.,Institute of Geological & Nuclear Sciences | Aghababaei M.,University of Auckland | Barnhill D.,University of Canterbury | And 12 more authors.
Bulletin of the New Zealand Society for Earthquake Engineering | Year: 2017

At 00:02 on 14th November 2016, a Mw 7.8 earthquake occurred in and offshore of the northeast of the South Island of New Zealand. Fault rupture, ground shaking, liquefaction, and co-seismic landslides caused severe damage to distributed infrastructure, and particularly transportation networks; large segments of the country's main highway, State Highway 1 (SHI), and the Main North Line (MNL) railway line, were damaged between Picton and Christchurch. The damage caused direct local impacts, including isolation of communities, and wider regional impacts, including disruption of supply chains. Adaptive measures have ensured immediate continued regional transport of goods and people. Air and sea transport increased quickly, both for emergency response and to ensure routine transport of goods. Road diversions have also allowed critical connections to remain operable. This effective response to regional transport challenges allowed Civil Defence Emergency Management to quickly prioritise access to isolated settlements, all of which had road access 23 days after the earthquake. However, 100 days after the earthquake, critical segments of SHI and the MNL remain closed and their ongoing repairs are a serious national strategic, as well as local, concern. This paper presents the impacts on South Island transport infrastructure, and subsequent management through the emergency response and early recovery phases, during the first 100 days following the initial earthquake, and highlights lessons for transportation system resilience.


Gonzalez A.,University for Development | Cubrinovski M.,University of Canterbury | Alabaster D.,New Zealand Transport Agency | Thenoux G.,University of Chile
Road Materials and Pavement Design | Year: 2012

A large research project on foamed bitumen (FB) stabilisation was conducted in New Zealand. The project consisted of an extensive laboratory and full-scale testing of FB pavements. The objective of this paper is to interpret the performance of FB pavements by using finite-element (FE) modelling. The mechanical properties of the materials were calculated using testing data and used as material inputs in the FE modelling. The Mohr-Coulomb and Drucker-Prager material models were adopted to calculate plastic deformation, which is related to pavement rutting. Results of the modelling indicate that increasing the FB content increases the tensile strength and modulus of the pavements, reducing the plastic deformations in the subgrade and the stabilised layer. In addition, adding FB reduces sensitivity to rutting when pavement is overloaded or the asphalt surface layer is cracked. © 2012 Taylor & Francis.


McCarten P.S.,Opus International Consultants Ltd | Lloyd N.,New Zealand Transport Agency
Bridge Maintenance, Safety, Management, Resilience and Sustainability - Proceedings of the Sixth International Conference on Bridge Maintenance, Safety and Management | Year: 2012

Barriers form the primary and most critical element for re-directing errant vehicles on bridges. Historically New Zealand bridges relied on concrete kerbs to provide the vehicle re-direction. The New Zealand Transport Agency has adopted NCHRP 350 to define collision performance and assesses the older bridge barriers are commonly only Test Level 2. Risk studies have shown that TL2 barrier performance is inadequate for current traffic volumes, vehicle weights and vehicle travel speeds on state highway bridges and hence barrier upgrades can often be justified. The risk studies have also shown new bridges require barrier collision performance at least equal to TL3. This paper introduces the New Zealand Transport Agency guideline document prepared to ensure consistency in evaluation of existing bridges and consistency in barrier retrofit design in order to optimise the structure asset management outcome. The paper also presents case studies for TL4 and higher collision performance bridge barrier retrofits. © 2012 Taylor & Francis Group.


Van Blerk G.,New Zealand Transport Agency | Fahey C.,Transfield Services
Airfield and Highway Pavement 2013: Sustainable and Efficient Pavements - Proceedings of the 2013 Airfield and Highway Pavement Conference | Year: 2013

Increased global financial constraints resulted in a continuing need to improve pavement performance at reduced input cost. This paper deals with a design and construction technique implemented by the New Zealand Transport Agency (NZTA) to deliver an increased «value for money» alternative to more costly options. The purpose of the construction technique is to optimize the inherent aggregate strength in crushed stone base layer properties by maximizing the stone packing, thus forcing a «full» stone-on-stone interlock obtained from a low fines and large crushed stone fraction aggregate grading. However, workability of the product becomes a challenge; this is improved by the addition of small amounts of cement (3%) during the mixing and compaction processes, thus forming a paste while in the hydraulic phase. The paper will look at various case studies were this technique has been used successfully as an alternative to structural asphalt and bitumen modified base layers for high traffic loading and high stress pavements. The methodology originated as a rehabilitation option implemented over the last four years for a performance specified maintenance contract (PSMC). In essence the system attempts to mechanise the Macadam construction methodology consisting of a high quality crushed stone skeleton. To achieve a stone interlocked layer through the use of modern stabilizer equipment cement is added to trap the limited fines within the grading. The case studies will show how the historical success of a stone interlocked pavement layer is captured in this design and construction technique, promising cost savings without compromising performance. © 2013 American Society of Civil Engineers.


Turner S.,Beca Infrastructure Ltd. | Wood G.,Macquarie University | Hughes T.,New Zealand Transport Agency | Singh R.,Beca Infrastructure Ltd.
Transportation Research Record | Year: 2011

After decades of decline, recreational and commuter cycling are becoming more popular in many Australasian cities. This renewed popularity is encouraging from the perspectives of sustainable transport and public health. A major concern to governments at all levels, however, is the higher crash risk that cyclists face, compared with drivers or passengers in motor vehicles, particularly when cyclists ride on roads. Transportation professionals should understand the level of risk that cyclists face within various parts of the road network and the measures that can be employed to mitigate that risk. This paper presents research findings from three main safety studies undertaken in New Zealand with the use of data from cities in New Zealand and in Adelaide, Australia. The research involved both generalized linear modeling and before-after, control-impact methods. Across the various studies, crash, traffic, and cycle volumes and layout data were collected for urban road links, traffic signals, and roundabouts. Flow-only models demonstrated a safety-in-numbers effect: crash risk per cyclist was shown to be lower as cycle volumes increased. When other variables were added to the models, it was possible to understand the impact on various crash types of factors such as road section length, motor vehicle speed, visibility, presence and type of cycle facilities, and lane and road width. Before-and-after analysis was employed to help identify the presence of any bias in the sites that had received cycle facilities. Research findings were mixed on the capacity of cycle facilities to improve safety. Well-designed facilities of adequate width and painted with color appeared to perform best.


Spies P.,New Zealand Transport Agency | Eratne S.,New Zealand Transport Agency | Ireland T.,Aurecon
Proceedings - Rapid Excavation and Tunneling Conference | Year: 2015

The New Zealand Transport Agency (TA) commenced its procurement process in 2010 and awarded a Design and Build with subsequent Maintain and Operate Alliance contract in November 2011 to a consortia of local and international designers and contractors. The project comprises twin 14.0 m OD tunnels) with associated motorway to motorway connections and is currently the largest tunneling project underway in the Southern hemisphere. With completion of the Design and Build phase scheduled for late 2016 this paper will describe the challenges and achievements to date from a Client perspective operating within a Collaborative contract model (Project Alliancing).


Hussain J.,University of Auckland | Wilson D.J.,University of Auckland | Henning T.F.P.,University of Auckland | Alabaster D.,New Zealand Transport Agency
Journal of Materials in Civil Engineering | Year: 2014

Unbound granular materials (UGM) are extensively used as basecourse materials around the world as they are capable of bearing relatively high traffic loads and are an economical option in comparison to bound materials. The unbound materials performance as basecourse determines the life-cycle costs of a pavement. The extent to which the repeated load triaxial test can predict the performance of unbound granular materials in the laboratory is an important parameter for road designers. Moreover, the performance of the unbound basecourse materials depends upon the moisture conditions when they are being loaded, gradation curve of the material, in situ density, permeability, and the nature of the aggregate fines (clays). There is a need to find the factors that cause the variation in the performance of the materials both in the laboratory and in-field pavement conditions to enable appropriate selection and use. This research utilizes accelerated pavement tests (APT) alongside repeated load triaxial (RLT) tests to test differently graded unbound granular materials at higher moisture contents. The objective of the research is to find the similarities and contrasts in basecourse material in both tests and to find the root causes of variation in the aggregate performance. If results of the RLT test can truly represent the results from full-scale APTs for basecourse materials, then the pavement materials industry can use the much lower costing RLT tests with confidence knowing it is representative of performance tests from APTs. The accelerated tests are performed on test pavements at the Canterbury Accelerated Pavement Testing Indoor Facility (CAPTIF) with the introduction of surface water, which replicates typical rainfall events. An increase in moisture in the basecourse layers is observed during the APTs due to entry of surface water through the surface seal, which allowed the performance of the basecourse material at higher moisture contents to be assessed. The RLT tests were conducted in parallel with the same basecourse materials at higher moisture conditions. The relative performance ranking of APTs and RLT tests is found to be the same for some materials; however, it differs in some cases. The similarities and differences in the rankings from both procedures are highlighted, and the causes of these similarities and differences are inferred and discussed. © 2014 American Society of Civil Engineers.


Spies P.,New Zealand Transport Agency | Ireland T.,Aurecon
Proceedings - Rapid Excavation and Tunneling Conference | Year: 2013

The selection of the Procurement method for major projects often has a significant outcome on the ultimate delivery of a project. The $1.2B Waterview Connection project is the largest and most complex project yet undertaken by the New Zealand Transport Agency and consideration was given to many contract forms. This paper describes the NZTA decision process in adopting the competitive alliance model, and more particularly measures taken during the procurement process to achieve certainty with respect to outcomes and minimize project risks whilst also achieving value for money. Refinements to the procurement process to ensure compliance with the Code of Practice for Risk Management of Tunnel Works prepared by the International Tunnel Insurance Group are described along with the other risk mitigation measures applied to achieve a successful procurement outcome. Also described is the alliance commercial model which serves to both facilitate collaboration between the Contracting consortia and Client to achieve "best for project" outcomes as well as managing commercial risks for all participants.

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