New York State Center for Complex Light

New York City, NY, United States

New York State Center for Complex Light

New York City, NY, United States

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Dudley A.,South African Council for Scientific and Industrial Research | Milione G.,City College of New York | Milione G.,The Graduate Center, CUNY | Milione G.,New York State Center for Complex Light | And 5 more authors.
Optics Express | Year: 2014

We present a new all-digital technique to extract the wavefront of a structured light beam. Our method employs non-homogeneous polarization optics together with dynamic, digital holograms written to a spatial light modulator to measure the phase relationship between orthogonal polarization states in real-time, thereby accessing the wavefront information. Importantly, we show how this can be applied to measuring the wavefront of propagating light fields, over extended distances, without any moving components. We illustrate the versatility of the tool by measuring propagating optical vortices, Bessel, Airy and speckle fields. The comparison of the extracted and programmed wavefronts yields excellent agreement. © 2014 Optical Society of America.


Alexeyev C.N.,Taurida National University | Alexeyev A.N.,Ukrainian Academy of Sciences | Lapin B.P.,Taurida National University | Milione G.,City University of New York | And 2 more authors.
Physical Review A - Atomic, Molecular, and Optical Physics | Year: 2013

We have studied the effect of the spin-orbit interaction on generation and conversion of optical vortices in multihelicoidal fibers, that is, the fibers possessing a multihelical refractive index profile. On the basis of a fully analytical approach we have obtained the spectra of coupled modes and their structure. Specifically, we have established selection rules, under which the spin-orbit interaction mediates the conversion of optical vortices into vortices with the topological charge changed by ±(ℓ±2), ℓ being the number of helical branches in refractive index distribution. Also, we have shown that the spin-orbit interaction can lead to generation of radially and azimuthally polarized TE and TM modes from optical vortices. We have also demonstrated that if such generation is mediated by a scalar-type perturbation of the fiber's form, it is possible only for weakly deformed fibers. For strongly deformed fibers such perturbation can result only in generation of vortices with zero total angular momentum. Additionally, we have studied the possibility of polarization control over the orbital angular momentum of the generated state in such a system. © 2013 American Physical Society.


Milione G.,Institute for Ultrafast Spectroscopy and Lasers | Milione G.,City University of New York | Milione G.,New York State Center for Complex Light | Dudley A.,South African Council for Scientific and Industrial Research | And 10 more authors.
Journal of Optics (United Kingdom) | Year: 2015

We experimentally measured the self-healing of the spatially inhomogeneous states of polarization of vector Bessel beams. Radially and azimuthally polarized vector Bessel beams were experimentally generated via a digital version of Durnin's method, using a spatial light modulator in concert with a liquid crystal q-plate. As a proof of principle, their intensities and spatially inhomogeneous states of polarization were experimentally measured using Stokes polarimetry as they propagated through two disparate obstructions. It was found, similar to their intensities, that their spatially inhomogeneous states of polarization self-healed. The self-healing can be understood via geometric optics, i.e., the interference of the unobstructed conical rays in the shadow region of the obstruction, and may have applications in, for example, optical trapping. © 2015 IOP Publishing Ltd.


Rumala Y.S.,City University of New York | Rumala Y.S.,New York State Center for Complex Light | Milione G.,City University of New York | Milione G.,New York State Center for Complex Light | And 14 more authors.
Optics Letters | Year: 2013

Spatially coherent multicolored optical vector vortex beams were created using a tunable liquid crystal q-plate and a supercontinuum light source. The feasibility of the q-plate as a tunable spectral filter (switch) was demonstrated, and the polarization topology of the resulting vector vortex beam was mapped. Potential applications include multiplexing for broadband high-speed optical communication, ultradense data networking, and super-resolution microscopy. © 2013 Optical Society of America.


Milione G.,City University of New York | Milione G.,New York State Center for Complex Light | Nolan D.A.,New York State Center for Complex Light | Nolan D.A.,Corning Inc. | And 2 more authors.
Journal of the Optical Society of America B: Optical Physics | Year: 2015

Mode dispersion can negatively impact optical fiber communication over multimode optical fibers (MMFs). Principal modes are a basis of spatial modes that do not experience mode dispersion up to the first order in frequency. In this work, a method to determine the principle modes of a MMF is proposed. This method is referred to as the mode dependent signal delay method, being the extension to a MMF of the analogous method to determine the principal states of polarization of a single-mode optical fiber. Using this method, principal modes can be determined by measuring N2-1 mean signal time delays at a MMF input for N2-1 launch conditions generated at a MMF output. The differences of the mode dependent signal delay method from the polarization signal delay method and its experimental implementation are discussed. © 2015 Optical Society of America.


PubMed | City College of New York, University of Southern California, Corning Inc., Tel Aviv University and 2 more.
Type: | Journal: Scientific reports | Year: 2015

Mode division multiplexing (MDM)- using a multimode optical fibers N spatial modes as data channels to transmit N independent data streams - has received interest as it can potentially increase optical fiber data transmission capacity N-times with respect to single mode optical fibers. Two challenges of MDM are (1) designing mode (de)multiplexers with high mode selectivity (2) designing mode (de)multiplexers without cascaded beam splittings 1/N insertion loss. One spatial mode basis that has received interest is that of orbital angular momentum (OAM) modes. In this paper, using a device referred to as an OAM mode sorter, we show that OAM modes can be (de)multiplexed over a multimode optical fiber with higher than -15dB mode selectivity and without cascaded beam splittings 1/N insertion loss. As a proof of concept, the OAM modes of the LP11 mode group (OAM-1,0 and OAM+1,0), each carrying 20-Gbit/s polarization division multiplexed and quadrature phase shift keyed data streams, are transmitted 5km over a graded-index, few-mode optical fibre. Channel crosstalk is mitigated using 44 multiple-input-multiple-output digital-signal-processing with <1.5dB power penalties at a bit-error-rate of 210(-3).


Rumala Y.S.,City University of New York | Rumala Y.S.,New York State Center for Complex Light
Proceedings of SPIE - The International Society for Optical Engineering | Year: 2014

When light travels through a spiral phase plate (SPP) device, it acquires structured wavefronts, i.e. a vortex containing orbital angular momentum. For an SPP device, which has a surface reflectivity, there will be multiple reflections in the device causing an azimuthal interference pattern. In this paper, the propagation of structured light is discussed after it has undergone multiple reflections in an SPP device under the thick-plate approximation.


Rumala Y.S.,City University of New York | Rumala Y.S.,New York State Center for Complex Light
Optical Engineering | Year: 2015

This work presents propagation dynamics of structured light (complex light) containing optical vortices after it has undergone multiple reflections in a spiral phase plate (SPP) device having a nonzero surface reflection. In the calculations, the thick-plate approximation is assumed as it is expected to give a more accurate representation of the standard geometry of an SPP device from a low-surface reflection to a high-surface reflection. Calculations showing the propagation of counter-rotating optical vortices are presented, and the effect of the statistical nature of photons on the observation of the angular intensity modulation of the beam is discussed. © 2015 Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers (SPIE).


Rumala Y.S.,City University of New York | Rumala Y.S.,New York State Center for Complex Light
Applied Optics | Year: 2015

The wave transfer matrix (WTM) is applied to calculating various characteristics of a spiral phase plate (SPP) for the first time to our knowledge. This approach provides a more convenient and systematic approach to calculating properties of a multilayered SPP device. In particular, it predicts the optical wave characteristics on the input and output plane of the device when the SPP is fabricated on a substrate of the same refractive index as the SPP as well as on a substrate of a different refractive index compared to the SPP. The dependence of the parameters on the input laser frequency is studied in detail for a low finesse SPP etalon device for both cases. The equations derived from the WTM are used to show that a variation in input laser frequency causes the optical intensity pattern on the output plane to rotate, while preserving the topology of the optical vortex, i.e., the variation in laser frequency has a minimal effect on the parameters describing the azimuthal intensity modulation and orbital angular momentum content of the beam. In addition, the equations predict the presence of longitudinal modes in the SPP device. © 2015 Optical Society of America.


Ruane G.J.,Rochester Institute of Technology | Ruane G.J.,New York State Center for Complex Light | Kanburapa P.,Rochester Institute of Technology | Han J.,Rochester Institute of Technology | And 2 more authors.
Applied Optics | Year: 2014

A white light vortex coronagraph was used to experimentally achieve sub-resolution detection. The angular location of the centroid γ, and the angular extent of circular pinhole sources Θ, were measured to within errors of δγ = ±0.015λ/D and δΘ = ±0.026λ/D. This technique has two advantages over conventional imaging: simple power measurements are made and shorter exposure times may be required to achieve a sufficient signal-to-noise ratio. © 2014 Optical Society of America.

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