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Rumala Y.S.,City University of New York | Rumala Y.S.,New York State Center for Complex Light
Applied Optics | Year: 2015

The wave transfer matrix (WTM) is applied to calculating various characteristics of a spiral phase plate (SPP) for the first time to our knowledge. This approach provides a more convenient and systematic approach to calculating properties of a multilayered SPP device. In particular, it predicts the optical wave characteristics on the input and output plane of the device when the SPP is fabricated on a substrate of the same refractive index as the SPP as well as on a substrate of a different refractive index compared to the SPP. The dependence of the parameters on the input laser frequency is studied in detail for a low finesse SPP etalon device for both cases. The equations derived from the WTM are used to show that a variation in input laser frequency causes the optical intensity pattern on the output plane to rotate, while preserving the topology of the optical vortex, i.e., the variation in laser frequency has a minimal effect on the parameters describing the azimuthal intensity modulation and orbital angular momentum content of the beam. In addition, the equations predict the presence of longitudinal modes in the SPP device. © 2015 Optical Society of America. Source


Rumala Y.S.,City University of New York | Rumala Y.S.,New York State Center for Complex Light
Proceedings of SPIE - The International Society for Optical Engineering | Year: 2014

When light travels through a spiral phase plate (SPP) device, it acquires structured wavefronts, i.e. a vortex containing orbital angular momentum. For an SPP device, which has a surface reflectivity, there will be multiple reflections in the device causing an azimuthal interference pattern. In this paper, the propagation of structured light is discussed after it has undergone multiple reflections in an SPP device under the thick-plate approximation. Source


Rumala Y.S.,City University of New York | Rumala Y.S.,New York State Center for Complex Light
Optical Engineering | Year: 2015

This work presents propagation dynamics of structured light (complex light) containing optical vortices after it has undergone multiple reflections in a spiral phase plate (SPP) device having a nonzero surface reflection. In the calculations, the thick-plate approximation is assumed as it is expected to give a more accurate representation of the standard geometry of an SPP device from a low-surface reflection to a high-surface reflection. Calculations showing the propagation of counter-rotating optical vortices are presented, and the effect of the statistical nature of photons on the observation of the angular intensity modulation of the beam is discussed. © 2015 Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers (SPIE). Source


Milione G.,City University of New York | Milione G.,New York State Center for Complex Light | Nolan D.A.,New York State Center for Complex Light | Nolan D.A.,Corning Inc. | And 2 more authors.
Journal of the Optical Society of America B: Optical Physics | Year: 2015

Mode dispersion can negatively impact optical fiber communication over multimode optical fibers (MMFs). Principal modes are a basis of spatial modes that do not experience mode dispersion up to the first order in frequency. In this work, a method to determine the principle modes of a MMF is proposed. This method is referred to as the mode dependent signal delay method, being the extension to a MMF of the analogous method to determine the principal states of polarization of a single-mode optical fiber. Using this method, principal modes can be determined by measuring N2-1 mean signal time delays at a MMF input for N2-1 launch conditions generated at a MMF output. The differences of the mode dependent signal delay method from the polarization signal delay method and its experimental implementation are discussed. © 2015 Optical Society of America. Source


Rumala Y.S.,City University of New York | Rumala Y.S.,New York State Center for Complex Light | Milione G.,City University of New York | Milione G.,New York State Center for Complex Light | And 14 more authors.
Optics Letters | Year: 2013

Spatially coherent multicolored optical vector vortex beams were created using a tunable liquid crystal q-plate and a supercontinuum light source. The feasibility of the q-plate as a tunable spectral filter (switch) was demonstrated, and the polarization topology of the resulting vector vortex beam was mapped. Potential applications include multiplexing for broadband high-speed optical communication, ultradense data networking, and super-resolution microscopy. © 2013 Optical Society of America. Source

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