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Techonomy Returns to New York for Two Days of Intense Conversation About Technology’s Impact on Business and Society Techonomy, a leading events and media company focused on helping organizations and executives prepare for the rapid pace of tech-enabled transformation, will hold two consecutive events, Techonomy Health & Techonomy NYC, in New York City on May 16th & 17th. Techonomy, a leading events and media company focused on helping organizations and executives prepare for the rapid pace of tech-enabled transformation, will hold two consecutive events, Techonomy Health & Techonomy NYC, in New York City on May 16th & 17th. “We love our home city in New York and we love helping leaders engage with ideas about tech-driven change, so we are especially proud to be doing that here for the second year in a row,” said David Kirkpatrick, CEO and Chief Techonomist and author of the bestselling book, The Facebook Effect: The Inside Story of the Company that is Connecting the World. "We're inviting techonomic thinkers to join us for either one or both of two days – Techonomy Health first, and then Techonomy NYC on May 17." Techonomy Health explores the vast potential tech holds to remake this $3 trillion U.S. industry. The program includes healthcare experts, technologists, policy makers and entrepreneurs for a high-energy discussion around topics including how AI and CRISPR will change the war on cancer, the future of consumer health information and media, the ethical and moral quandaries of enhancing the human genome, and what Trumpcare and Obamacare mean for health innovation. Speakers include Len Greer, President, Johnson & Johnson Health and Wellness; Meredith Guerriero, director for the healthcare industry at Facebook; Arianna Huffington, Founder and CEO, Thrive Global; John Mattison, Chief Medical Information Officer, Kaiser Permanente; celebrated author and holistic medicine expert Dean Ornish; Claudia González Romo, Executive Office of the Secretary General, UNICEF; Oscar CEO Mario Schlosser; Brent Shafer, CEO of Philips North America; and Steven Zatz, CEO of WebMD. (Full list below.) The following day, Techonomy NYC will be a New York-style version of Techonomy’s longstanding retreat in California, where last fall Mark Zuckerberg famously spoke about fake news. Techonomy NYC will ignite invigorating discourse around ongoing challenges relating to what a government led by Trump means for technology; the future of work in an on-demand gig economy; the digital and social fight against terrorism; and tough-to-answer questions about decision making power in an AI world, among many other topics. Speakers include Beth Comstock, Vice Chair of GE; Karin Klein, Head of Investing Activities at VC firm Bloomberg Beta; Environmental Defense Fund President Fred Krupp; Turner CEO John Martin; Miguel McKelvey, Co-founder and Chief Creative Officer of WeWork; Eli Pariser, Co-founder and Co-CEO of Upworthy; and General Assembly CEO Jake Schwartz. (Full list below.) Techonomy's partners for the conferences include Accenture, Celestica, Cognizant, Johnson & Johnson, Paypal, Philips, Pitney-Bowes, and Turner Broadcasting. Techonomy Health confirmed speakers include: Yonatan Adiri, Founder and CEO, Healthy.io and Founder, DisruptionLabs; Agnes Binagwaho Vice Chancellor, University of Global Health Equity; Jef Boeke, Director of the Institute for Systems Genetics, NYU Langone Medical Center; Walter De Brouwer, Founder and CEO, doc.ai; Brian Donley, Chief of Staff, Cleveland Clinic; David Ewing Duncan, Co-Founder, Curator and CEO, Arc Fusion; Esther Dyson, Chairman, EDventure Holdings; Katelyn Gleason, CEO & Cofounder, Eligible; Claudia González Romo, Executive Office of the Secretary General, UNICEF; Len Greer, President, Johnson & Johnson Health and Wellness Solutions; Meredith Guerriero, director for the healthcare industry at Facebook Ron Gutman, Founder and CEO, HealthTap; Jill Hagenkord, Chief Medical Officer, Color Genomics; Arianna Huffington, Founder and CEO, Thrive Global; Nancy J. Kelley, President and CEO, Nancy J. Kelley & Associates and Former Founding Executive Director, New York Genome Center; Robert Klitzman, Director, Masters of Bioethics Program, Joseph Mailman School of Public Health, Columbia University; Tom Kottler, CEO, Co-Founder, HealthPrize Technologies; Steven Krein, Co-founder and CEO, StartUp Health; Andrew Kung, Chair and Professor, Department of Pediatrics, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center; Kristin Lemkau, Chief Marketing Officer, JPMorgan Chase; Christian Madsbjerg, Senior Partner, ReD Associates; John Mattison, Chief Medical Information Officer, Kaiser Permanente; Dan Munro, Author; Alexi Nazem, Co-founder and CEO, Nomad Health; Lynn O'Connor Vos, Chief Executive Officer, Grey Healthcare Group (ghg); Dean Ornish, President and Director, Preventive Medicine Research Institute; Meredith Salisbury, Editorial Director, Bioscribe; Mario Schlosser, Co-founder and CEO, Oscar; Brent Shafer, CEO, Philips North America; Seth Sternberg, Co-founder and CEO, Honor; Andrew Thompson, Co-founder and CEO, Proteus Digital Health, Inc.; and Steven Zatz, CEO, WebMD. Current agenda and additional information can be found at www.techonomy.com/health Techonomy NYC confirmed speakers include: Daniel Buchner, Senior PM - Head of Decentralized Identity at Microsoft, Microsoft; Beth Comstock, Vice Chair, GE; Meltem Demirors, Director, Development, Digital Currency Group; Diana Farrell, President and CEO, JPMorgan Chase Institute; Max Furmanov, Managing Director & Partner, Accenture; Andrea Glorioso, Counsellor, Digital Economy / Cyber, Delegation of the European Union to the USA; COL John Graham, Associate Dean for Research and Chief Scientist, United States Military Academy; Subramaniam Hariharan, VP Global Quality, Technology Innovation & Operational Excellence, Celestica; Jessi Hempel, Head of Editorial, Backchannel; Karin Klein, Head of Investing Activities, Bloomberg Beta; Fred Krupp, President, Environmental Defense Fund; Doreen Lorenzo, Co-founder, Vidlet Inc.; Director for the Center of Integrated Design, The University of Texas; Rachel Maguire, Research Director, Health Horizons Program, Institute for the Future; Gary Marcus, Professor, NYU; Founder, Geometric Intelligence (acquired by Uber); John Martin, Chairman and Chief Executive Officer, Turner; Miguel McKelvey, Co-founder and Chief Creative Officer, WeWork; Gregory McNeal, Co-Founder, AirMap; John Melkon, Center for the Study of Civil-Military Operations, United States Military Academy; Michael Monahan, Executive Vice President and Chief Operating Officer, Pitney Bowes; Eli Pariser, Co-founder and Co-CEO, Upworthy; Bre Pettis, Founder, Bre & Co.; Ernesto Quinteros, Chief Design Officer, Johnson & Johnson; Andrew Rasiej, Founder and Publisher, Personal Democracy Forum; Founder and CEO, Civic Hall; Slava Rubin, Chief Business Officer, Indiegogo; Julie Samuels, Executive Director, Tech:NYC; Jake Schwartz, Co-founder and CEO, General Assembly; Melanie Shapiro, Founder and CEO, Case; Oz Sultan, CEO, Sultan Interactive Group; Arun Sundararajan, Professor of Business, New York University; Author, "The Sharing Economy"; David Treat, Managing Director, Accenture; Bradley Tusk, Founder and CEO, Tusk Ventures; Michael J. Wolf, Co-founder and Managing Director, Activate, Inc.; and Tracy Young, CEO and Co-founder, PlanGrid. Current agenda and additional information can be found at www.techonomy.com/nyc Contacts: Techonomy Josh Kampel 617.233.7722 josh@techonomy.com Grayling Crystal Yang 415.593.1188 techonomy@grayling.com New York, NY, April 25, 2017 --( PR.com )-- GE’s Beth Comstock, Arianna Huffington of Thrive Global, and John Martin of Turner are among 60 speakers dissecting the role of tech on social and economic progress, and especially in health.Techonomy, a leading events and media company focused on helping organizations and executives prepare for the rapid pace of tech-enabled transformation, will hold two consecutive events, Techonomy Health & Techonomy NYC, in New York City on May 16th & 17th.“We love our home city in New York and we love helping leaders engage with ideas about tech-driven change, so we are especially proud to be doing that here for the second year in a row,” said David Kirkpatrick, CEO and Chief Techonomist and author of the bestselling book, The Facebook Effect: The Inside Story of the Company that is Connecting the World. "We're inviting techonomic thinkers to join us for either one or both of two days – Techonomy Health first, and then Techonomy NYC on May 17."Techonomy Health explores the vast potential tech holds to remake this $3 trillion U.S. industry. The program includes healthcare experts, technologists, policy makers and entrepreneurs for a high-energy discussion around topics including how AI and CRISPR will change the war on cancer, the future of consumer health information and media, the ethical and moral quandaries of enhancing the human genome, and what Trumpcare and Obamacare mean for health innovation. Speakers include Len Greer, President, Johnson & Johnson Health and Wellness; Meredith Guerriero, director for the healthcare industry at Facebook; Arianna Huffington, Founder and CEO, Thrive Global; John Mattison, Chief Medical Information Officer, Kaiser Permanente; celebrated author and holistic medicine expert Dean Ornish; Claudia González Romo, Executive Office of the Secretary General, UNICEF; Oscar CEO Mario Schlosser; Brent Shafer, CEO of Philips North America; and Steven Zatz, CEO of WebMD. (Full list below.)The following day, Techonomy NYC will be a New York-style version of Techonomy’s longstanding retreat in California, where last fall Mark Zuckerberg famously spoke about fake news. Techonomy NYC will ignite invigorating discourse around ongoing challenges relating to what a government led by Trump means for technology; the future of work in an on-demand gig economy; the digital and social fight against terrorism; and tough-to-answer questions about decision making power in an AI world, among many other topics. Speakers include Beth Comstock, Vice Chair of GE; Karin Klein, Head of Investing Activities at VC firm Bloomberg Beta; Environmental Defense Fund President Fred Krupp; Turner CEO John Martin; Miguel McKelvey, Co-founder and Chief Creative Officer of WeWork; Eli Pariser, Co-founder and Co-CEO of Upworthy; and General Assembly CEO Jake Schwartz. (Full list below.)Techonomy's partners for the conferences include Accenture, Celestica, Cognizant, Johnson & Johnson, Paypal, Philips, Pitney-Bowes, and Turner Broadcasting.Techonomy Health confirmed speakers include:Yonatan Adiri, Founder and CEO, Healthy.io and Founder, DisruptionLabs; Agnes Binagwaho Vice Chancellor, University of Global Health Equity; Jef Boeke, Director of the Institute for Systems Genetics, NYU Langone Medical Center; Walter De Brouwer, Founder and CEO, doc.ai; Brian Donley, Chief of Staff, Cleveland Clinic; David Ewing Duncan, Co-Founder, Curator and CEO, Arc Fusion; Esther Dyson, Chairman, EDventure Holdings; Katelyn Gleason, CEO & Cofounder, Eligible; Claudia González Romo, Executive Office of the Secretary General, UNICEF; Len Greer, President, Johnson & Johnson Health and Wellness Solutions; Meredith Guerriero, director for the healthcare industry at Facebook Ron Gutman, Founder and CEO, HealthTap; Jill Hagenkord, Chief Medical Officer, Color Genomics; Arianna Huffington, Founder and CEO, Thrive Global; Nancy J. Kelley, President and CEO, Nancy J. Kelley & Associates and Former Founding Executive Director, New York Genome Center; Robert Klitzman, Director, Masters of Bioethics Program, Joseph Mailman School of Public Health, Columbia University; Tom Kottler, CEO, Co-Founder, HealthPrize Technologies; Steven Krein, Co-founder and CEO, StartUp Health; Andrew Kung, Chair and Professor, Department of Pediatrics, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center; Kristin Lemkau, Chief Marketing Officer, JPMorgan Chase; Christian Madsbjerg, Senior Partner, ReD Associates; John Mattison, Chief Medical Information Officer, Kaiser Permanente; Dan Munro, Author; Alexi Nazem, Co-founder and CEO, Nomad Health; Lynn O'Connor Vos, Chief Executive Officer, Grey Healthcare Group (ghg); Dean Ornish, President and Director, Preventive Medicine Research Institute; Meredith Salisbury, Editorial Director, Bioscribe; Mario Schlosser, Co-founder and CEO, Oscar; Brent Shafer, CEO, Philips North America; Seth Sternberg, Co-founder and CEO, Honor; Andrew Thompson, Co-founder and CEO, Proteus Digital Health, Inc.; and Steven Zatz, CEO, WebMD.Current agenda and additional information can be found at www.techonomy.com/healthTechonomy NYC confirmed speakers include:Daniel Buchner, Senior PM - Head of Decentralized Identity at Microsoft, Microsoft; Beth Comstock, Vice Chair, GE; Meltem Demirors, Director, Development, Digital Currency Group; Diana Farrell, President and CEO, JPMorgan Chase Institute; Max Furmanov, Managing Director & Partner, Accenture; Andrea Glorioso, Counsellor, Digital Economy / Cyber, Delegation of the European Union to the USA; COL John Graham, Associate Dean for Research and Chief Scientist, United States Military Academy; Subramaniam Hariharan, VP Global Quality, Technology Innovation & Operational Excellence, Celestica; Jessi Hempel, Head of Editorial, Backchannel; Karin Klein, Head of Investing Activities, Bloomberg Beta; Fred Krupp, President, Environmental Defense Fund; Doreen Lorenzo, Co-founder, Vidlet Inc.; Director for the Center of Integrated Design, The University of Texas; Rachel Maguire, Research Director, Health Horizons Program, Institute for the Future; Gary Marcus, Professor, NYU; Founder, Geometric Intelligence (acquired by Uber); John Martin, Chairman and Chief Executive Officer, Turner; Miguel McKelvey, Co-founder and Chief Creative Officer, WeWork; Gregory McNeal, Co-Founder, AirMap; John Melkon, Center for the Study of Civil-Military Operations, United States Military Academy; Michael Monahan, Executive Vice President and Chief Operating Officer, Pitney Bowes; Eli Pariser, Co-founder and Co-CEO, Upworthy; Bre Pettis, Founder, Bre & Co.; Ernesto Quinteros, Chief Design Officer, Johnson & Johnson; Andrew Rasiej, Founder and Publisher, Personal Democracy Forum; Founder and CEO, Civic Hall; Slava Rubin, Chief Business Officer, Indiegogo; Julie Samuels, Executive Director, Tech:NYC; Jake Schwartz, Co-founder and CEO, General Assembly; Melanie Shapiro, Founder and CEO, Case; Oz Sultan, CEO, Sultan Interactive Group; Arun Sundararajan, Professor of Business, New York University; Author, "The Sharing Economy"; David Treat, Managing Director, Accenture; Bradley Tusk, Founder and CEO, Tusk Ventures; Michael J. Wolf, Co-founder and Managing Director, Activate, Inc.; and Tracy Young, CEO and Co-founder, PlanGrid.Current agenda and additional information can be found at www.techonomy.com/nycContacts:TechonomyJosh Kampel617.233.7722josh@techonomy.comGraylingCrystal Yang415.593.1188techonomy@grayling.com


News Article | May 2, 2017
Site: news.yahoo.com

Last May a seemingly commonplace meeting kicked off a firestorm of controversy. More than 100 experts in genetics and bioengineering convened at Harvard Medical School for a meeting that was closed to the public — attendees were asked not to contact news media or to post about the meeting on social media. The same group is getting back together in New York City next week. To the meeting organizers, last year's secretive measures were, counterintuitively, to make sure as many people heard about the project as possible. They were submitting a paper about the project to a scientific journal and were discouraged from sharing the information publicly before it was published. But there's another reason why this group of scientists, while encouraging debate and public involvement, would be wary of attracting too much attention. Their project is an effort to synthesize DNA, including human DNA. Researchers will start with simpler organisms, such as microbes and plants, but hope to ultimately create strands of human genetic code. One of the group's organizers, Jef Boeke, director of the Institute for Systems Genetics at NYU School of Medicine, told CNBC that incorporating synthesized DNA into mammalian (or even human) cells could happen in four to five years. This project follows in the footsteps of the Human Genome Project (HGP), the 13-year, $2.7 billion project that enabled scientists to first decode the human genome. "HGP allowed us to read the genome, but we still don't completely understand it," said Nancy Kelley, the coordinator of the new effort, dubbed GP-write. High school biology covers the basic building blocks for DNA, called nucleotides — adenine (A), cytosine (C), guanine (G) and thymine (T). Humans' 3 billion pairs provide the blueprints for how to build our cells. The intention of GP-write is to provide a better fundamental understanding of how these pieces work together. Using synthesized genomes has both pragmatic and theoretical implications — it could lead to lower cost and higher quality of DNA synthesis, discoveries about DNA assembly in cells and the ability to test many DNA variations. "If you do that, you gain a much deeper understanding of how a complicated apparatus goes," Boeke said. Boeke likens the genome to a bicycle — you can only fully understand something once you take it apart and put it back together. "Really, a synthetic genome is an engine for learning new information." More from Modern Medicine: Medical breakthroughs are way behind for the hard of hearing In the land of Vikings, an ambitious effort to find a cancer cure New guidelines for prostate cancer screening Boeke is particularly excited about what he calls an "ultrasafe cell line." Certain types of mammalian cells intended to produce certain types of large molecule drugs, called biologics. "[Cell lines] have been cultured in dishes in labs for decades. But you can't engineer the genomes — the tools for doing that are quite crude, relatively speaking," Boeke said. Sometimes these cells get infected with a virus, and it completely shuts down drug production. A synthetic cell that lacked unnecessary genetic material could, evidence suggests, be virus-resistant, consistently producing useful drugs to treat disease. The results of GP-write could also lead to stem cell therapy that doesn't run the risk of infecting the patient with another disease, which appears to be what happened to one patient who received stem cell treatment in Mexico. Or they could create a line of microorganisms that could help humans generate some of their own amino acids — nutrients we usually get from food. These outcomes, of course, won't happen overnight. Boeke, who has spent years synthesizing yeast DNA, knows there will be plenty of technical hurdles. "Getting big pieces of DNA efficiently into mammalian cells, engineering them rapidly, these will be major challenges," he said. Scientists will also have to do that without breaking the bank. Right now, Kelley estimates that it costs 10 cents to synthesize every base pair, the bonded molecules that make up the double helix of DNA (start-up GenScript advertises even higher prices, at 23 cents for "economy"). Considering that humans have 3 billion base pairs. "If we can get that [cost] down to one cent per base pair, it would really make a difference," Kelley said. Since last May's meeting, Kelley, Boeke and their collaborators have published an article in Science about the project, as well as a white paper outlining its timeline. Close to 200 researchers and collaborators around the world have expressed interest in participating, Kelley says, ranging from institutional researchers to corporate scientists. Preliminary experiments are already underway, and the project organizers are discussing the project with companies as well as federal and state agencies that might help them reach their goal of raising $100 million this year. They estimate GP-write should cost less, in total, than the $3 billion Human Genome Project, though they have not provided more specific cost projections. It might not be so bad if these advances took some time. After news broke of the May meeting, some criticized the way the rollout was handled. "Given that human genome synthesis is a technology that can completely redefine the core of what now joins all of humanity together as a species, we argue that discussions of making such capacities real ... should not take place without open and advance consideration of whether it is morally right to proceed," read one op-ed, published in Cosmos. Boeke says a public and scientific discussion is exactly what the GP-write organizers intend to have. "I think articulation of our plan not to start right off synthesizing a full human genome tomorrow was helpful. We have a four- to five-year period where there can be plenty of time for debate about the wisdom of that, whether resources should be put in that direction or in another. Whenever it's human, everyone has an opinion and wants their voice to be heard. We want to hear what people have to say," Boeke said. Up to 250 people are expected at the New York Genome Center meeting, which will include discuss of applications, ethics and logistics behind the GP-write project. New technology that can help the 360 million people with hearing loss The race is on to stop a Zika virus epidemic in the US


News Article | May 16, 2017
Site: globenewswire.com

SEATTLE and BOSTON, May 16, 2017 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- Global supercomputer leader, Cray Inc. (Nasdaq:CRAY) and Markley, a premier provider of data center space and cloud computing services, today announced a partnership to provide supercomputing as a service solutions that combine the power of Cray supercomputers with the premier hosting capabilities of Markley. Through the partnership, Markley will offer Cray supercomputing technologies, as a hosted offering, and both companies will collaborate to build and develop industry-specific solutions. The availability of sought-after supercomputing capabilities both on-premises and in the cloud has become increasingly desirable across a range of industries, including life sciences, bio-pharma, aerospace, government, banking, and more – as organizations work to analyze complex data sets and research, and reduce time to market for new products. Through the new supercomputing as a service offering, Cray and Markley will make it easier and more affordable for research scientists, data scientists, and IT executives to access dedicated, powerful compute and analytic capability to increase time to discovery and decision. “The need for supercomputers has never been greater,” said Patrick W. Gilmore, chief technology officer at Markley. “For the life sciences industry especially, speed to market is critical. By making supercomputing and big data analytics available in a hosted model, Markley and Cray are providing organizations with the opportunity to reap significant benefits, both economically and operationally.” Headquartered in Boston, Markley delivers best-of-breed cloud and data center offerings, including its enterprise-class, on-demand Infrastructure-as-a-Service solution that helps organizations maximize IT performance, reduce upfront capital expenses, increase speed to market, and improve business continuity. In addition, Markley guarantees 100 percent uptime, backed by the industry’s best Service Level Agreement. “Cray and Markley are changing the game,” said Fred Kohout, Cray’s senior vice president of products and chief marketing officer. “Now any company that has needed supercomputing capability to address their business-critical research and development needs can easily and efficiently harness the power of a Cray supercomputer. We are excited to partner with Markley to create this new market for Cray.” The first industry solution built by Cray and hosted by Markley will feature the Cray® Urika®-GX for life sciences – a complete, pre-integrated hardware-software solution. In addition, Cray has integrated the Cray Graph Engine (CGE) with essential pattern-matching capability and tuned it to leverage the highly-scalable parallelization and performance of the Urika-GX platform. Cray and Markley have plans for the collaboration to quickly expand and include Cray’s full range of infrastructure solutions. The Cray Urika-GX system is the first agile analytics platform that fuses supercomputing abilities with open enterprise standards to provide an unprecedented combination of versatility and speed for high-frequency insights, tailor-made for life sciences research and discovery. “Research and development, particularly within life sciences, biotech and pharmaceutical companies, is increasingly data driven. Advances in genome sequencing technology mean that the sheer volume of data and analysis continues to strain legacy infrastructures,” said Chris Dwan, who led research computing at both the Broad Institute and the New York Genome Center. “The shortest path to breakthroughs in medicine is to put the very best technologies in the hands of the researchers, on their own schedule. Combining the strengths of Cray and Markley into supercomputing as a service does exactly that.” “HPC environments are increasingly being used for high-performance analytics use cases that require real-time decision making such as cybersecurity, real-time marketing, digital twins, and emerging needs driven by big data and Internet of Things (IoT) use cases. Augmenting your on-premises infrastructure with HPC clouds enables you to meet your existing SLAs while scaling up performance-driven analytics for emerging use cases,” notes Gartner, in Follow These Three Steps to Optimize Business Value from Your HPC Environments, by Chirag Dekate, September 16, 2016. Cray and Markley will be hosting meetings to discuss the new supercomputing-as-a-service solution at Bio-IT World Conference and Expo, May 23-25, 2017, in Boston, at booth #452. Cray and Markley will also host a live webinar, “Power Your Analytics with Supercomputing as a Service,” June 13th at 10:00 a.m. PDT. You can register for the webinar here. For more information and to speak to a Cray or Markley sales representative, please contact us at Cray.com or at Markley.com About Cray Inc. Global supercomputing leader Cray Inc. (Nasdaq:CRAY) provides innovative systems and solutions enabling scientists and engineers in industry, academia and government to meet existing and future simulation and analytics challenges. Leveraging more than 40 years of experience in developing and servicing the world’s most advanced supercomputers, Cray offers a comprehensive portfolio of supercomputers and big data storage and analytics solutions delivering unrivaled performance, efficiency and scalability. Cray’s Adaptive Supercomputing vision is focused on delivering innovative next-generation products that integrate diverse processing technologies into a unified architecture, allowing customers to meet the market’s continued demand for realized performance. Go to www.cray.com for more information. About Markley Markley is a premier provider of mission-critical data center facilities and cloud computing services. The company guarantees clients 100 percent uptime and is trusted by Fortune 1000 companies, major global consumer brands, and the world’s most cutting-edge research firms to deliver high availability, consistent performance, and unparalleled client service. Markley is the only company in the world that hosts a supercomputing-as-a-service solution. Founded in 1992, the company owns and operates nearly 1.5 million square feet of highly secure space and multiple, strategically located cloud point-of-deliveries (PODs) covering all regions and time zones. To learn more about Markley, please visit: www.markleygroup.com. Safe Harbor Statement This press release contains forward-looking statements within the meaning of Section 21E of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 and Section 27A of the Securities Act of 1933, including, but not limited to, statements related to the availability of Cray supercomputing technologies and solutions through Markley, the market and sales prospects of service offerings of those solutions and the ability of those solutions to perform as expected. These statements involve current expectations, forecasts of future events and other statements that are not historical facts. Inaccurate assumptions and known and unknown risks and uncertainties can affect the accuracy of forward-looking statements and cause actual results to differ materially from those anticipated by these forward-looking statements. Factors that could affect actual future events or results include, but are not limited to, the risk that Cray and Markley are not able to successfully complete their planned product and solution development efforts related to the Markley offerings within the planned timeframes or at all, the risk that the offered solutions do not perform as expected or as required by customers or partners, the risk that Markley will not be able to sell these service offerings as expected and such other risks as identified in the Company’s quarterly report on Form 10-Q for the quarter ended March 31, 2017, and from time to time in other reports filed by Cray with the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission. You should not rely unduly on these forward-looking statements, which apply only as of the date of this release. Cray undertakes no duty to publicly announce or report revisions to these statements as new information becomes available that may change the Company’s expectations. Cray, the stylized CRAY mark and URIKA are registered trademarks of Cray Inc. in the United States and other countries, and CRAY GRAPH ENGINE is a trademark of Cray Inc. Other product and service names mentioned herein are the trademarks of their respective owners.


News Article | May 16, 2017
Site: globenewswire.com

SEATTLE and BOSTON, May 16, 2017 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- Global supercomputer leader, Cray Inc. (Nasdaq:CRAY) and Markley, a premier provider of data center space and cloud computing services, today announced a partnership to provide supercomputing as a service solutions that combine the power of Cray supercomputers with the premier hosting capabilities of Markley. Through the partnership, Markley will offer Cray supercomputing technologies, as a hosted offering, and both companies will collaborate to build and develop industry-specific solutions. The availability of sought-after supercomputing capabilities both on-premises and in the cloud has become increasingly desirable across a range of industries, including life sciences, bio-pharma, aerospace, government, banking, and more – as organizations work to analyze complex data sets and research, and reduce time to market for new products. Through the new supercomputing as a service offering, Cray and Markley will make it easier and more affordable for research scientists, data scientists, and IT executives to access dedicated, powerful compute and analytic capability to increase time to discovery and decision. “The need for supercomputers has never been greater,” said Patrick W. Gilmore, chief technology officer at Markley. “For the life sciences industry especially, speed to market is critical. By making supercomputing and big data analytics available in a hosted model, Markley and Cray are providing organizations with the opportunity to reap significant benefits, both economically and operationally.” Headquartered in Boston, Markley delivers best-of-breed cloud and data center offerings, including its enterprise-class, on-demand Infrastructure-as-a-Service solution that helps organizations maximize IT performance, reduce upfront capital expenses, increase speed to market, and improve business continuity. In addition, Markley guarantees 100 percent uptime, backed by the industry’s best Service Level Agreement. “Cray and Markley are changing the game,” said Fred Kohout, Cray’s senior vice president of products and chief marketing officer. “Now any company that has needed supercomputing capability to address their business-critical research and development needs can easily and efficiently harness the power of a Cray supercomputer. We are excited to partner with Markley to create this new market for Cray.” The first industry solution built by Cray and hosted by Markley will feature the Cray® Urika®-GX for life sciences – a complete, pre-integrated hardware-software solution. In addition, Cray has integrated the Cray Graph Engine (CGE) with essential pattern-matching capability and tuned it to leverage the highly-scalable parallelization and performance of the Urika-GX platform. Cray and Markley have plans for the collaboration to quickly expand and include Cray’s full range of infrastructure solutions. The Cray Urika-GX system is the first agile analytics platform that fuses supercomputing abilities with open enterprise standards to provide an unprecedented combination of versatility and speed for high-frequency insights, tailor-made for life sciences research and discovery. “Research and development, particularly within life sciences, biotech and pharmaceutical companies, is increasingly data driven. Advances in genome sequencing technology mean that the sheer volume of data and analysis continues to strain legacy infrastructures,” said Chris Dwan, who led research computing at both the Broad Institute and the New York Genome Center. “The shortest path to breakthroughs in medicine is to put the very best technologies in the hands of the researchers, on their own schedule. Combining the strengths of Cray and Markley into supercomputing as a service does exactly that.” “HPC environments are increasingly being used for high-performance analytics use cases that require real-time decision making such as cybersecurity, real-time marketing, digital twins, and emerging needs driven by big data and Internet of Things (IoT) use cases. Augmenting your on-premises infrastructure with HPC clouds enables you to meet your existing SLAs while scaling up performance-driven analytics for emerging use cases,” notes Gartner, in Follow These Three Steps to Optimize Business Value from Your HPC Environments, by Chirag Dekate, September 16, 2016. Cray and Markley will be hosting meetings to discuss the new supercomputing-as-a-service solution at Bio-IT World Conference and Expo, May 23-25, 2017, in Boston, at booth #452. Cray and Markley will also host a live webinar, “Power Your Analytics with Supercomputing as a Service,” June 13th at 10:00 a.m. PDT. You can register for the webinar here. For more information and to speak to a Cray or Markley sales representative, please contact us at Cray.com or at Markley.com About Cray Inc. Global supercomputing leader Cray Inc. (Nasdaq:CRAY) provides innovative systems and solutions enabling scientists and engineers in industry, academia and government to meet existing and future simulation and analytics challenges. Leveraging more than 40 years of experience in developing and servicing the world’s most advanced supercomputers, Cray offers a comprehensive portfolio of supercomputers and big data storage and analytics solutions delivering unrivaled performance, efficiency and scalability. Cray’s Adaptive Supercomputing vision is focused on delivering innovative next-generation products that integrate diverse processing technologies into a unified architecture, allowing customers to meet the market’s continued demand for realized performance. Go to www.cray.com for more information. About Markley Markley is a premier provider of mission-critical data center facilities and cloud computing services. The company guarantees clients 100 percent uptime and is trusted by Fortune 1000 companies, major global consumer brands, and the world’s most cutting-edge research firms to deliver high availability, consistent performance, and unparalleled client service. Markley is the only company in the world that hosts a supercomputing-as-a-service solution. Founded in 1992, the company owns and operates nearly 1.5 million square feet of highly secure space and multiple, strategically located cloud point-of-deliveries (PODs) covering all regions and time zones. To learn more about Markley, please visit: www.markleygroup.com. 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News Article | April 17, 2017
Site: cerncourier.com

Until recently, attempts to store information in DNA strands have only been able to reach a fraction of the theoretical maximum storage capacity. A new method developed by Yaniv Erlich and Dina Zielinski of the New York Genome Center goes much further towards this goal. Based on a class of computer code called a fountain, the researchers were able to approach the so-called Shannon capacity while protecting against data corruption. As a result, they were able to store 2.14 × 106 bytes of information (including a full computer operating system, a short French film from 1895, a $50 Amazon gift card, a Pioneer plaque and a 1948 work by Claude Shannon, after compression) in DNA oligonucleotides, which they could then perfectly retrieve using a process that allows 2.18 × 1015 retrievals. The results indicate that perfect data storage and retrieval is feasible at a density of 215 petabytes per gram of DNA, improving on previous work by an order of magnitude.


Tuesday morning, more than 200 biologists, businesspeople, and ethicists will converge on the New York Genome Center in New York City to jump-start what they hope will be biology’s next blockbuster: Genome Project-write (GP-write), a still-unfunded sequel to the Human Genome Project where instead of reading a human genome, scientists create one from scratch and incorporate it into cells for various research and medical purposes. For example, proponents suggest that they could design a synthetic genome to make human cells resistant to viral infections, radiation, and cancer. Those cells could be used immediately for industrial drug production. With additional genome tinkering to avoid rejection by the immune system, they could be used clinically as a universal stem cell therapy. The project got off to a bumpy start last year and despite the central rallying cry of a synthetic human genome, many of those attending the conference will bring in different expectations and ambitions. Some resent the unwanted attention and criticism that the project’s public objective has brought, saying it distracts from the goal of improving DNA synthesis technologies, because cheaper and faster methods to write DNA have many applications in applied and basic research. Others say that a made-to-order human genome is inevitable anyway, hoping to seize the publicity and controversy it creates as an opportunity to educate the public about synthetic biology. “If you put humans as the target, even though you are not going to make a human baby, it will be provocative, it will be misinterpreted, but people will engage,” says Andrew Hessel, a self-described futurist and biotechnology catalyst at Autodesk in San Francisco, California, a successful software company that specializes in 3D design programs for architecture and other fields that has been exploring synthetic biology applications in recent years. Hessel is one of the four founders of GP-write, along with lawyer Nancy Kelley and geneticists Jef Boeke of New York University Langone Medical Center in New York City and George Church of Harvard University. GP-write debuted prematurely in May 2016, when an invitation-only meeting at Harvard became public and sparked a media firestorm about the lack of transparency for an initiative that to some people sounded like a plan to create genetically enhanced humans—the leaders say it isn’t, although Church wasn’t shy when musing about designer humans in a 2012 book he authored. The intent of the closed-door meeting was to allow scientists to speak freely, Hessel and the other leaders say, and to prepare a peer-reviewed paper describing the project that was later published in in June. The month gap between the meeting and the paper created further confusion because the paper’s embargo forbade scientists from discussing the project. GP-write’s founders hope that this week’s open meeting will reinforce the seriousness of the initiative. Ethicists and lawyers are now sprinkled throughout the group’s many nooks, and several young biotech startups and software developers have expressed interest in GP-write. Scientists are also encouraged to propose their own pilot projects to serve as stepping stones, although many participants are careful to note that these projects are valuable regardless of whether the group decides to reach for the ultimate goal of synthesizing a human genome. “There is definitely an internal tension” among GP-write’s supporters, Hessel says. “Scientists are a conservative community. Hessel first proposed a vision to synthesize a human genome in a Huffington Post article back in 2012. Several years later, during an international conference about synthesizing the yeast genome in 2015, Hessel reiterated the goal in a panel discussion, saying it should be biology’s next big science effort. “Frankly, I was surprised that the scientific community hadn’t organized to suggest something like this,” Hessel says. “It just seemed kind of obvious and I think it stunned the crowd.” A week later, Hessel called Church and asked whether he would be open to leading the initiative. Church agreed, provided Boeke, the leader of the international synthetic yeast project Sc2.0, came aboard as a co-leader. Boeke took a bit more convincing. “My immediate reaction was, ‘Oh my gosh, you have got to be kidding me,’” Boeke says. “I am definitely the conservative of the group.” But then he was persuaded that some of the pilot goals of the project were worthwhile. “I got most excited about it when George brought his idea of virus-resistant mammalian cells on the table, and the idea of an ultrasafe cell line, which could be a relatively short-term win,” Boeke says. Engineering an ultrasafe cell line would be a boon to biotechnology companies that use large vats of cells to crank out biologic drugs or industrial molecules. They now must constantly monitor for signs of a viral infection that could wipe out tanks of cells across an entire manufacturing facility. The synthetic biology effort was originally called Human Genome Project 2, but the founders changed the name to Human Genome Project-write by the time of the closed-door meeting last May. Since then, they dropped “human” in an attempt to diffuse public controversies. “The human part of it really got a lot of people overly excited, and that kind of overshadowed the intent to make it be about writing genomic sequences in general,” Boeke says. “Both George Church and I from the very beginning always envisioned this as not being limited to humans.” That expanded vision is particularly apparent in this week’s meeting, which will include talks from scientists working with genomes from species as varied as bacteria, yeast, octopuses, and plants. But despite the carefully crafted allusion to the Human Genome Project, which garnered about $3 billion in financial support from government and industry, GP-write, for now, doesn’t have any money to offer researchers. “We hope the [National Institutes of Health] will be involved in GP-write but thus far they haven’t been as enthusiastic as we are,” Boeke says. GP-write’s current funding is a far cry from the $100 million they hoped to raise in 2016. Last year, Autodesk contributed $250,000 to GP-write to kick-start planning and organization. The next round of funding may come from Labcyte, a firm specializing in machines that manipulate miniscule amounts of liquid through ultrasound. According to a meeting organizer, Labcyte will be GP-write’s first corporate partner. The company confirms it has made a 3-year financial commitment, but has not disclosed the terms yet. So far, scientists hoping to be part of GP-write are pursuing synthetic biology pilot projects with funding they’ve gotten independently. Harris Wang of Columbia University told Insider that he will receive $500,000 from the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) to engineer about 40 nonhuman metabolic genes into human cells, enabling them to produce the nine essential amino acids that we now must get from our diet. A small tech company called Chromologic received $200,000 from DARPA to study methods for shuttling large strands of synthetic DNA into cells, although this project was not explicitly related to GP-write. And early stage startup Neochromosome, which includes Boeke, intends to raise money to design synthetic chromosomes for medicine that could be used in an off-the-shelf universal cell line in cell therapies and transplants with minimal risk of rejection from the immune system. Technical feasibility aside, an undertaking right now to synthesize a complete human genome would be extraordinarily expensive—easily upward of $100 million with current pricing. The human genome is 3 billion nucleotides long. “That’s a million times bigger than the longest piece [of DNA] we make today,” says Emily Leproust, CEO of Twist Bioscience in San Francisco. Her company has developed a faster, higher-throughput method to assemble DNA for about $0.09 per base compared with a previous average of $0.25, she says. And although companies like Twist could stand to benefit from large orders of DNA from GP-write, she notes that “to do the kind of science that the GP-write is talking about, there needs to be a massive technology improvement.” One young startup, Molecular Assemblies in San Diego, California, has rejected the decades-old organic chemistry method of linking DNA bases. Instead, they are refining a new method that utilizes a little-studied DNA-making enzyme found in some cells. The company anticipates going commercial within 2 to 3 years with a process using a template independent polymerase—an unusual enzyme that, unlike most polymerases, synthesizes DNA without having a strand whose sequence can be copied. “Our nascent company motto is that we think DNA will be the industrial polymer of the 21st century,” chief scientific officer Bill Efcavitch says. Beyond the numerous synthetic biology applications, Efcavitch envisions that cheaper and more rapid DNA synthesis will push innovation in nanotechnology applications, such as using DNA for biosensors and data storage. “There is lots of good science going on, but it is initiated and funded outside GP-write, because there is no funding yet,” says Seattle, Washington–based biotech investor Robert Carlson, an author of the GP-write paper published in . “You can conceive of this meeting as some people gathering around a beer or a whiteboard and saying, 'Let’s lay out some experiments to test some ideas about how genomes are put together and why they are organized the way they are.'” Whether the project develops financial legs to carry out its goals remains to be seen, but at the very least, it is recruiting a passionate, if not fully unified, group. “At the end of the day, it is really about putting the foundation in place to write much larger genomes than we are presently able to, and to recognize that these technologies are coming very quickly whether we are ready for them or not,” Hessel says. “I think this is just going to be a kickass meeting. The room is going to be full of interesting folks. And I am sure there will be dissenters too.” Correction, 6:25 P.M. This story has been changed to clarify that no specific announcement regarding Labcyte's funding is planned for the New York meeting.


News Article | May 10, 2017
Site: www.eurekalert.org

New York, NY - The Center for Excellence in Engineering Biology today announced funding for a pilot study entitled "Engineering Prototrophy in Mammalian Cells," which will aim to generate versions of human cells that can grow with significantly reduced external nutrients (e.g. 'prototrophic'). The support comes through a grant of approximately $500,000 awarded to Columbia University by the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA). The objective of the pilot project is to generate human cells that can produce metabolites - small molecules needed for growth. Longer-term, the study could help generate new information about the biochemical environment needed for mammalian development, cell differentiation, and nutrition-associated aging processes. Information from the project may also lead to more efficient methods of synthesizing drugs and biologics produced in mammalian cell lines. The principal investigators of the funded project are Harris Wang, Ph.D., Assistant Professor, Department of Systems Biology at Columbia University, and Jef D. Boeke, Ph.D., Director, Institute for Systems Genetics, Professor, Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Pharmacology, NYU Langone Medical Center. This project is the first of several anticipated pilot projects currently seeking support as part of the Genome Project-write (GP-write) Grand Challenge, a multi-center, international technology initiative focused on DNA synthesis and the engineering of metabolic pathways, led by a multi-disciplinary group of scientific leaders and coordinated by the Center for Excellence in Engineering Biology. "It's really amazing to think we can see what happens if we restore to mammalian cells grown in dishes signaling pathways that were lost millions of years ago in evolution," said Boeke. He added, "I believe this is an example of genome engineering in human cells that will not only generate new knowledge, but may help us solve a practical problem in biotechnology." "By engineering mammalian metabolism, we will not only learn about how cells use nutrients to grow, but also how those processes, when they go awry, can contribute to diseases such as cancer," said Wang. "It's exciting to embark on this pilot project as a part of the GP-write Grand Challenge. I'm look forward to working with many others in this global effort," he added. GP-write, which has no direct affiliation with DARPA, will focus on using synthesis and genome editing technologies to understand, engineer and test model organisms as well as less tractable human and plant cell lines. The goal of GP-write is not only to deepen an understanding of life but to develop pragmatic technology of general use in biology, improving the cost and quality of DNA synthesis, and DNA assembly in cells. Planning for GP-write has been underway for the past three years, through a series of meetings of scientists, culminating in a Science publication in June 2016 and a white paper in November 2016. The funding announcement was made at a meeting of GP-write held this week at the New York Genome Center in New York City. The meeting agenda included discussions about roadmaps for the project, including scientific direction, technology development, ethical, social and legal engagement, standards and infrastructure development, amongst others. Scientific topics included the introduction and discussion of new Pilot Projects and the creation of an Industry Consortium. GP-write will be implemented through the Center of Excellence for Engineering Biology, a new, independent nonprofit organization that will manage planning and coordination efforts. These efforts include supporting the formation and work of multi-institutional and interdisciplinary research teams working in a highly integrated fashion, responsive to and engaged with a broad public outreach. Nancy J Kelley, J.D., M.P.P., is the lead executive of GP-write and the Center of Excellence for Engineering Biology.

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