New York Blood Center

New York City, NY, United States

New York Blood Center

New York City, NY, United States
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News Article | June 13, 2017
Site: www.prnewswire.com

Owen Garrick, MD, MBA: Dr. Owen Garrick is a physician who has had a career focused on the research and finance sides of healthcare. He is President & COO of Bridge Clinical Research, a contract research organization that focuses on several therapeutic areas and is dedicated to increasing minority representation among principal investigators participating in clinical trials. Dr. Garrick was formerly Director of Corporate Strategy and M&A at McKesson Corporation. Prior to McKesson, Dr. Garrick served as Executive Director and Co-Head of Mergers & Acquisitions at Novartis Pharmaceuticals. Previously he spent four years at Goldman Sachs in New York, functioning as an investment advisor working with private healthcare companies as they sought to grow, raise capital, and perform initial public offerings. He has served as the President of the American Medical Association and was confirmed to the HHS Secretary's Advisory Committee on Human Research Protections from 2012-2016. Faye Wattleton: Ms. Wattleton is Managing Director and Corporate Governance Practice Head at Alvarez & Marsal. She has developed an extraordinary track record of leadership as both a CEO of national nonprofit organizations and as a director of public and private corporations, academic institutions, and high-impact philanthropic organizations, including as chair of audit and corporate governance committees. Ms. Wattleton is a past member of the Board of Trustees of Columbia University, and currently serves on the Board of Governors of the Pardee Rand Graduate School, the Board of Directors of Jazz at Lincoln Center and the "I Have A Dream" Foundation.  She is the 2004 recipient of the prestigious Fries Prize for service to improving public health, was inducted into the National Women's Hall of Fame in 1993, and the single honoree for Ohio State University alumni medalist award for national and international career achievement. "I am thrilled to welcome Ariel, Owen, and Faye to the Board of Trustees as we continue to navigate the challenges of guiding a prominent healthcare institution like NYBC," said David Tendler, Chairman of the NYBC Board of Trustees. "These three professionals will add a tremendous amount of personal and industry expertise to our Board." Founded in 1964, New York Blood Center (NYBC) is a nonprofit organization that is one of the largest independent, community-based blood centers in the world. NYBC, along with its partner organizations Community Blood Center of Kansas City, Missouri (CBC), and Innovative Blood Resources (IBR), based in St. Paul, Minnesota, collect approximately 3,500 units of blood products each day, serving local communities of more than 40 million people in New York, New Jersey, parts of Connecticut and Pennsylvania, the Kansas City metropolitan area, Minnesota, and Nebraska. NYBC and its partners also provide a wide array of transfusion-related medical services, including Comprehensive Cell Solutions, the National Center for Blood Group Genomics, the National Cord Blood Program, and the Lindsley F. Kimball Research Institute, which — among other milestones — developed the Hepatitis B vaccine and a patented solvent detergent plasma process innovating blood-purification technology worldwide. To view the original version on PR Newswire, visit:http://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/new-york-blood-center-announces-new-trustees-300473134.html


News Article | June 25, 2017
Site: www.prnewswire.com

O negative blood donors are considered "universal," and their blood type is needed most readily in trauma situations and emergency departments across the country. Due to its high demand, O negative blood is in short supply, and NYBC encourages individuals with this blood type to consider stepping forward and donating today. Our local blood supply has reached a critically low level, with under a two-day supply of O negative, B negative, and A negative blood. As we head into the summer months, we are reminded of how essential it is that our communities maintain steady participation in blood donation. The best preparation for an unpredictable tragedy is having blood on hospital shelves in advance. This is key to potentially saving lives. "By spreading the word or even hosting your own blood drive, inviting friends, family, and community organizations, you may save lives in your community," said Andrea Cefarelli, Executive Director of NYBC. "We are in dire need of O negative blood with a reserve that is currently below a two day supply, and that is just too low." Historically, during the summer months, blood centers have had to focus on building up the community's blood supply, as it tends to diminish due to seasonal factors. While summer months are marked by a long vacation period, with schools in recess and leisure time, the need for blood never takes a vacation. NYBC urges individuals to seek out nearby blood donation centers and to engage in the selfless act of donating, helping to prevent a summer blood shortage and potentially saving the life of someone in need. The entire donation process takes less than an hour and a single donation can be used to save multiple lives. Donors with O-negative blood type, or "universal donors," are especially encouraged to donate, as their blood can be used in emergencies. Nearly 2,000 donations are needed each day in New York and New Jersey alone. About one in seven hospital admissions requires a blood transfusion, and with a limited shelf life, supplies must be continually replenished. If you cannot donate but still wish to participate in bringing crucial blood products to patients in need, please ask someone to donate for you, or consider volunteering at a local blood drive. Any company, community organization, place of worship, or individual may host a blood drive . Blood donors receive free mini-medical exams on-site, including information about their temperature, blood pressure, and hematocrit level. Eligible donors include those people at least age 16 (parental consent is required for 16-year-olds), who weigh a minimum of 110 pounds, are in good health, and meet all Food & Drug Administration and NY or NJ State Department of Health donor criteria. People age 76 or older may donate if they have a doctor's note on file with New York Blood Center or if they bring one on the day of the blood drive. Founded in 1964, New York Blood Center (NYBC) is a nonprofit organization that is one of the largest independent, community-based blood centers in the world. NYBC, along with its partner organizations Community Blood Center of Kansas City, Missouri (CBC), and Innovative Blood Resources (IBR), based in St. Paul, Minnesota, collect approximately 3,500 units of blood products each day, serving local communities of more than 40 million people in New York, New Jersey, parts of Connecticut and Pennsylvania, the Kansas City metropolitan area, Minnesota, and Nebraska. NYBC and its partners also provide a wide array of transfusion-related medical services, including Comprehensive Cell Solutions, the National Center for Blood Group Genomics, the National Cord Blood Program, and the Lindsley F. Kimball Research Institute, which — among other milestones — developed the Hepatitis B vaccine and a patented solvent detergent plasma process innovating blood-purification technology worldwide. To view the original version on PR Newswire, visit:http://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/new-york-blood-center-declares-blood-emergency-300479354.html


"We are extremely grateful to the NIH for moving this project forward," said Dr. Lustigman, who has studied river blindness for more than 30 years at NYBC. "New tools are desperately needed, particularly a prophylactic vaccine that will support the elimination of this disease rather than only controlling it by mass drug administration (MDA) with ivermectin, which reduces transmission but does not cure the disease." Dr. Lustigman added: "While we are pleased to have received this new round of funding after a hiatus of two years, we still need additional support and funding to put further research towards clinical development and to finally end this neglected disease." Dr. Lustigman's approach for developing a prophylactic vaccine includes two parallel strategies. She and her partners will test vaccine formulations in mice to identify those that induce the highest protective immunity. Formulations will then be tested in naïve calves against a natural infection with O. ochengi, a closely related parasite known to mimic the immunological status of humans living in regions susceptible for O. volvulus infection. Once the optimal vaccine formulation is found, the consortium will move to clinical development and first-in-human clinical phase 1 trials by the year 2020. "We believe that our strategic goal should be to vaccinate children who have not yet had access to MDA with ivermectin; the vaccination will prevent infection in this vulnerable population, and also help prevent reintroduction of infection in areas where it might have been controlled through MDA," Dr. Lustigman said. "This is what these essential clinical trials will help us to prove." "Dr. Lustigman and NYBC's Laboratory of Molecular Parasitology have continued in decades of leadership toward developing a vaccine that will forever change the lives of the millions affected by this disease," said Christopher D. Hillyer, MD, President and CEO of NYBC. "This is a critical time: we are closer than ever to developing a prophylactic vaccine for River Blindness. This is a proud moment for NYBC, as we are at the forefront of this multinational effort." Lord Alexander John "Sandy" Trees, Emeritus Professor of Veterinary Parasitology, University of Liverpool, and Crossbench Member of the United Kingdom's House of Lords said: "It is very exciting to see that partners from United States, UK and Africa have joined forces to advance the world's first onchocerciasis vaccine and continue on in a mission I was part of. They will use the natural infection system in calves that I developed years ago to validate the effectiveness of their onchocerciasis vaccines before they are tested in the first clinical trial with humans." Lord Trees has made significant contributions to the field of tropical medicine, and in particular to those suffering from River Blindness in West Africa. Dr. Lustigman and NYBC are part of the international initiative TOVA – The Onchocerciasis Vaccine for Africa – which was established in 2015 and is comprised of 14 world-renowned scientists and research centers. Its mission is to develop recombinant protein-based vaccines that will support the efforts to eliminate River Blindness in Sub-Saharan Africa. More information on the TOVA Initiative can be found at: http://www.riverblindnessvaccinetova.org/. The collaborative partners on the NIH grant are Dr. Ben Makepeace of the University of Liverpool, UK; Dr. Maria Elena Bottazzi of the Baylor College of Medicine in Houston, TX; and Dr. David Abraham of the Thomas Jefferson University in Philadelphia, PA. New York Blood Center (NYBC) is a nonprofit organization that is one of the largest independent, community-based blood centers in the country. Founded in 1964, NYBC, along with its partner organizations Community Blood Center of Greater Kansas City (CBC) and Innovative Blood Resources (IBR), based St. Paul, Minnesota, collect approximately 3,300 units of blood products each day, serving local communities of more than 25 million people in New York, New Jersey, parts of Connecticut and Pennsylvania, the Kansas City metropolitan area, Minnesota, and Nebraska. NYBC and its partners also provide a wide array of transfusion-related medical services, while NYBC's National Cord Blood Program (NCBP) at the Howard P. Milstein Cord Blood Center is home to the world's largest public cord blood bank. NYBC is also home to a renowned research institute, the Lindsley F. Kimball Research Institute, which – among other milestones – led to the development of a Hepatitis B vaccine and innovative blood purification technology. To view the original version on PR Newswire, visit:http://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/36-million-nih-grant-awarded-to-nybc-scientist-for-research-on-river-blindness-vaccine-300476040.html


Ginzburg Y.,New York Blood Center | Rivella S.,Cornell University
Blood | Year: 2011

β-thalassemia is a disease characterized by anemia and is associated with ineffective erythropoiesis and iron dysregulation resulting in iron overload. The peptide hormone hepcidin regulates iron metabolism, and insufficient hepcidin synthesis is responsible for iron overload in minimally transfused patients with this disease. Understanding the crosstalk between erythropoiesis and iron metabolism is an area of active investigation in which patients with and models of β-thalassemia have provided significant insight. The dependence of erythropoiesis on iron presupposes that iron demand for hemoglobin synthesis is involved in the regulation of iron metabolism. Major advances have been made in understanding iron availability for erythropoiesis and its dysregulation in β-thalassemia. In this review, we describe the clinical characteristics and current therapeutic standard in β-thalassemia, explore the definition of ineffective erythropoiesis, and discuss its role in hepcidin regulation. In preclinical experiments using interventions such as transferrin, hepcidin agonists, and JAK2 inhibitors, we provide evidence of potential new treatment alternatives that elucidate mechanisms by which expanded or ineffective erythropoiesis may regulate iron supply, distribution, and utilization in diseasessuch as β-thalassemia. © 2011 by The American Society of Hematology.


Terminal erythroid differentiation starts from morphologically recognizable proerythroblasts that proliferate and differentiate to generate red cells. Although this process has been extensively studied in mice, its characterization in humans is limited. By examining the dynamic changes of expression of membrane proteins during in vitro human terminal erythroid differentiation, we identified band 3 and α4 integrin as optimal surface markers for isolating 5 morphologically distinct populations at successive developmental stages. Functional analysis revealed that these purified cell populations have distinct mitotic capacity. Use of band 3 and α4 integrin enabled us to isolate erythroblasts at specific developmental stages from primary human bone marrow. The ratio of erythroblasts at successive stages followed the predicted 1:2:4:8:16 pattern. In contrast, bone marrows from myelodysplastic syndrome patients exhibited altered terminal erythroid differentiation profiles. Thus, our findings not only provide new insights into the genesis of the red cell membrane during human terminal erythroid differentiation but also offer a means of isolating and quantifying each developmental stage during terminal erythropoiesis in vivo. Our findings should facilitate a comprehensive cellular and molecular characterization of each specific developmental stage of human erythroblasts and should provide a powerful means of identifying stage-specific defects in diseases associated with pathological erythropoiesis.


Foxp3(+) regulatory T cells (Tregs) play a pivotal role in control of autoimmunity and pathological immune responses. Helios, the Ikarus family transcription factor, binds to the Foxp3 promoter, stabilizing its expression, and is expressed in 70% of peripheral Tregs of healthy individuals. This frequency is altered during malignancy, infection, and autoimmunity, although the mechanisms that control proliferation and relative numbers of Helios(+/-) Tregs remain largely unknown. Using a T-cell-monocyte in vitro stimulation assay, we now show that proliferation of Helios(+) Tregs is inhibited by CD16(+) monocyte subset. Antibody blocking with anti-interleukin (IL)-12 reversed this inhibition, whereas addition of IL-12 suppressed Helios(+) Treg expansion, indicating that CD16(+) monocyte control of Helios(+) Treg numbers is mediated through IL-12. In contrast, proliferation of Helios(-) Tregs, which express higher levels of tumor necrosis factor receptor II (TNFRII), was suppressed by TNF-α, whereas anti-TNF-α and anti-TNFRII reversed the inhibition. CD16(-) monocyte subset was mainly responsible for TNF-α-mediated control of Helios(-) Treg expansion. Altogether, these data suggest a differential role for monocyte subsets in control of Helios(+/-) Treg development that is mediated by distinct inflammatory cytokines. These data may have important implications for understanding the pathogenesis as well as control of chronic inflammatory and autoimmune diseases.


Zhong H.,New York Blood Center
Blood | Year: 2012

Immune thrombocytopenia (ITP) results from decreased platelet production and accelerated platelet destruction. Impaired CD4(+) regulatory T-cell (Treg) compartment and skewed Th1 and possibly Th17 responses have been described in ITP patients. The trigger for aberrant T-cell polarization remains unknown. Because monocytes have a critical role in development and polarization of T-cell subsets, we explored the contribution of monocyte subsets in control of Treg and Th development in patients with ITP. Unlike circulating classic CD14(hi)CD16(-) subpopulation, the CD16(+) monocyte subset was expanded in ITP patients with low platelet counts on thrombopoietic agents and positively correlated with T-cell CD4(+)IFN-γ(+) levels, but negatively with circulating CD4(+)CD25(hi)Foxp3(+) and IL-17(+) Th cells. Using a coculture model, we found that CD16(+) ITP monocytes promoted the expansion of IFN-γ(+)CD4(+) cells and concomitantly inhibited the proliferation of Tregs and IL-17(+) Th cells. Th-1-polarizing cytokine IL-12, secreted after direct contact of patient T-cell and CD16(+) monocytes, was responsible for the inhibitory effect on Treg and IL-17(+)CD4(+) cell proliferation. Our findings are consistent with ITP CD16(+) monocytes promoting Th1 development, which in turn negatively regulates IL-17 and Treg induction. This underscores the critical role of CD16(+) monocytes in the generation of potentially pathogenic Th responses in ITP.


Shaz B.H.,New York Blood Center
Blood | Year: 2014

In this issue of Blood, McKenzie et al provide further insight into the mechanism of antibody-mediated transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI), and Silliman et al demonstrate the potential use of a novel filter to mitigate red blood cell (RBC) transfusion-associated TRALI. The first manuscript with studies performed in a murine model suggests that HLA class I antibody-mediated TRALI, which requires antibody binding to peripheral blood monocytes producing interleukin-8 (IL-8) which binds chemokine (C-X-C motif) ligand (CXCL), is a chemotactic for neutrophils and induces neutrophil degranulation; the antibody-coated monocytes also result in lung damage. The second manuscript shows that prestorage RBC filtration to absorb antibodies and lipids as well as white blood cells and platelets, decreases TRALI-associated antibodies and neutrophil-priming activity of the unit, mitigating TRALI in an animal model. © 2014 by The American Society of Hematology.


Patent
New York Blood Center | Date: 2014-04-09

Disclosed herein are systems and methods for user protection from blood splatter during blood tubing sealing. Systems and methods described herein utilize a blood splatter safety shield attached to a handheld blood tubing sealer, comprising one or more barriers, wherein at least one barrier runs substantially perpendicular to the handheld blood tubing sealer separating blood tubing being sealed from a user of the handheld blood tubing sealer.


Patent
New York Blood Center | Date: 2015-07-10

Disclosed herein are trimeric polypeptide pharmaceutical compositions comprising three monomers, each monomer comprising a polypeptide having the amino acid sequence of the N-terminal heptad repeat (NHR or HR1) or C-terminal heptad repeat (CHR or HR2) of the transmembrane glycoprotein of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and a trimerization motif.

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