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University Park, NM, United States

New Mexico Highlands University is a public university located in Las Vegas, New Mexico. Wikipedia.


Egan A.,New Mexico Highlands University
Northern Journal of Applied Forestry | Year: 2011

The heavily populated states of southern New England-Connecticut, Massachusetts, and Rhode Island-are primarily forested, providing forest-related services and timber and nontimber forest products. Despite reported challenges to the region's forestry sector, including a shortage of logging capacity, there has been a lack of systematically gathered data about the region's logging community. A mailed survey, informed by focus groups, key informant interviews, and previous research, was used to develop baseline information about the region's logging business owners and to explore challenges to the region's logging businesses. There were few significant differences among logging businesses and logging business owners from the three southern New England states for the attributes studied. Although some mechanized felling was reported, most logging businesses in the region used chain saw felling and 46% of the businesses reported a logging equipment value of less than $100,000. Logging business owners cited several challenges to maintaining or expanding their businesses, including day-to-day operating costs, equipment and insurance costs, the price of stumpage, a shrinking forestland base, and harvest regulations. In addition, there was a general perception of the public's lack of respect for loggers and logging, as well as a perceived disconnect between forest products that the public consumes and the work that loggers perform. Loggers in the region appeared to have less familial attachment to logging, more nonlogging employment opportunity, and a diminished sense of occupational prestige compared with other logging business owners in the northeast. As with similar studies of the logging communities in other states in the northeast, this study represents a reference point from which future studies of the region's logging workforce may be more clearly understood. Copyright © 2011 by the Society of American Foresters. Source


Bentson L.F.,New Mexico Highlands University
Andrology | Year: 2013

Mice with repro27 exhibit fully penetrant male-specific infertility associated with a nonsense mutation in the golgin subfamily A member 3 gene (Golga3). GOLGA3 is a Golgi complex-associated protein implicated in protein trafficking, apoptosis, positioning of the Golgi and spermatogenesis. In repro27 mutant mice, a point mutation in exon 18 of the Golga3 gene that inserts a pre-mature termination codon leads to an absence of GOLGA3 protein expression. GOLGA3 protein was undetectable in the brain, heart and liver in both mutant and control mice. Although spermatogenesis in Golga3(repro27) mutant mice appears to initiate normally, development is disrupted in late meiosis during the first wave of spermatogenesis, leading to significant germ cell loss between 15 and 18 days post-partum (dpp). Terminal Deoxynucleotidyl Transferase dUTP-mediated Nick End Labeling analysis showed elevated DNA fragmentation in meiotic germ cells by 12 dpp, suggesting apoptosis as a mechanism of germ cell loss. The few surviving post-meiotic round spermatids exhibited abnormal spermiogenesis with defects in acrosome formation, head and tail development and extensive vacuolization in the seminiferous epithelium. Analysis of epididymal spermatozoa showed significantly low sperm concentration and motility and in vitro fertilization with mutant spermatozoa was unsuccessful. Golga3(repro27) mice lack GOLGA3 protein and thus provide an in vivo tool to aid in deciphering the role of GOLGA3 in Golgi complex positioning, cargo trafficking and apoptosis signalling in male germ cells. © 2013 American Society of Andrology and European Academy of Andrology. Source


Patent
New Mexico Highlands University and Los Alamos National Security Llc | Date: 2014-09-15

A process for synthesizing 4-amino-2,4-dioxobutanoic acid involves reacting diethyl oxalate with an alkoxide in ethanol to form a reaction mixture, and afterward adding ethyl cyanoacetate to the reaction mixture and allowing a reaction to proceed under conditions suitable to form a first reaction product of the formula diethyl 2-cyano-3-hydroxy-butenedioate, and then isolating the diethyl 2-cyano-3-hydroxy-butenedioate, and afterward reacting the diethyl-2-cyano-3-hydroxy-butenedioate with an aqueous hydroxide under conditions suitable to form 4-amino-2,4-dioxobutanoic acid.


Patent
New Mexico Highlands University and Los Alamos National Security LLC | Date: 2014-09-17

A first process for synthesizing 4-amino-2,4-dioxobutanoate involves reacting a dialkyl oxalate with an alkoxide in ethanol to form a reaction mixture, and afterward adding an alkyl cyanoacetate to the reaction mixture and allowing a reaction to proceed under conditions suitable to form a first reaction product of the formula diethyl 2-cyano-3-hydroxy-butenedioate, and then isolating the diethyl 2-cyano-3-hydroxy-butenedioate, and afterward reacting the diethyl-2-cyano-3-hydroxy-butenedioate with an aqueous hydroxide under conditions suitable to form 4-amino-2,4-dioxobutanoate. A second process for synthesizing 4-amino-2,4-dioxobutanoate involves reacting a dialkyl oxalate with an alkoxide in ethanol to form a reaction mixture, and afterward adding acetonitrile to the reaction mixture and allowing a reaction to proceed under conditions suitable to form a first reaction product in the form of an alkali salt of the formula ethyl 3-cyano-2-oxopropenolate, and then isolating the ethyl 3-cyano-2-oxopropenolate , and afterward either (a) reacting the ethyl 3-cyano-2-oxopropenolate with an aqueous hydroxide under conditions suitable to form 4-amino-2,4-dioxobutanoate; or (b) reacting the ethyl 3-cyano-2-oxopropenolate with hydrogen peroxide and ion exchange resin under conditions suitable to form 4-amino-2,4-dioxobutanoate. In these processes, the 4-amino-2,4-dioxobutanoate may be acidified into 4-amino-2,4-dioxobutanoic acid.


Grant
Agency: NSF | Branch: Standard Grant | Program: | Phase: Catalyzing New Intl Collab | Award Amount: 27.11K | Year: 2014

This award for Catalyzing New International Collaborations(CNIC) provides the PI, Michael Petronis, and two U.S. graduate students from New Mexico Highlands University with an opportunity to travel to the Czech Republic (CR) and initiate a collaboration with partners from the Czech Geological Survey and the Czech Academy of Sciences Institute of Rock Structures and Mechanisms. Together the U.S.-Czech team will examine the growth of ancient volcanoes in the Jièín Volcanic Field, CR, and compare those volcanoes to ones in northern New Mexico. Their goal is to derive new paradigms for understanding the development of small volcanoes, known as cinder cones, which are the most common terrestrial volcanic feature on Earth. Through laboratory studies and field research at two or more Czech volcanic sites, the US-Czech team intends to test common models of small volcano construction that treat the magma feeder system as a simple dike or pipe-like conduit that transports magma vertically from a reservoir to the eruptive vent. Their alternative hypothesis maintains that feeder geometries beneath these apparently simple exteriors are considerably more complex. This catalytic effort is expected to establish essential ground work for follow-on cooperative research and applications to NSF-Tectonics and NSF-Petrology and Geochemistry programs with the parallel goal of involving under-represented U.S. students in futue field and laboraroty aspects of such projects, thereby contributing to the next generation of geoscientists, with early career international research experience.

If successful, new preliminary data should assist with defining the evolution of the anticipated, more complex magma feeder system, specifically, one that involves multiple, time-transgressive injections beneath the cone with magma transported vertically upward and downward and laterally toward and away from the central vent conduit. The team hypothesizes that magma supply rate (e.g., pulsed versus continuous), magma pressure as well as magma composition, influence the subvolcanic construction geometries and edifice deformation. Their field methods will include primary field observations of eruption products, deposit characteristics, and structural measurements, as well as sample collection. Laboratory methods are to include thin section petrology, paleomagnetic, anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility analysis, and geophysical surveys to map the subsurface structure. The new data obtained during these activities in partnership with Czech colleagues will enable preliminary assessments of magmatic flow patterns, sub-volcanic deformation (microstructures and paleomagnetism), and the subsurface structure of the volcanoes (geophysics). If the Czech Republic volcanoes yield results and data similar to that from sites previously studied by the PI, then the U.S.-Czech team maintains that this pattern of magma flow beneath small volcanoes may be established as a new norm, potentially transforming our fundamental understanding of the most abundant volcanic construct on Earth.

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