Time filter

Source Type

Casler M.D.,U.S. Department of Agriculture | Undersander D.J.,University of Wisconsin - Madison | Papadopolous Y.A.,Agriculture and Agri Food Canada | Bittman S.,Agriculture and Agri Food Canada | And 18 more authors.
Crop Science | Year: 2014

Orchardgrass (Dactylis glomerata L.) is a major component of many pastures in temperate North America. Early and profuse flowering in pastures is problematic, because livestock refuse to consume flowering stems, prompting many graziers to simply avoid using this species. The objective of this research was to determine the impact of reduced flowering on the quality of harvested forage under two harvest managements of orchardgrass. Six cultivars, three normal cultivars and three sparse-flowering cultivars (mean panicle density of 141 vs. 61 panicles m?2, respectively), were evaluated in field experiments at 21 locations in North America under a 3-cut harvest management. These cultivars were also evaluated at seven locations under a 5-cut harvest management. Sparse-flowering cultivars averaged 9% greater crude protein (CP), 3% lower neutral detergent fiber (NDF), 2% greater NDF digestibility, and 2% greater in vitro dry matter digestibility (IVDMD) than normal cultivars. For the two digestibility measures, differential panicle density between the cultivar groups explained a significant portion of variability, indicating that the increase in forage quality was proportional to the decrease in panicle density below a threshold of about 50 panicles m-2. Lastly, differences in regrowth forage quality between cultivar groups were smaller, less consistent, and of lesser statistical significance than for first harvest. While selection for sparse flowering in orchardgrass resulted in significant cause-and-effect increases in first-harvest forage quality, these effects were too small to offset the reduced forage yield associated with the sparse-flowering trait. © Crop Science Society of America.


Choo T.M.,Agriculture and Agri Food Canada | ter Beek S.M.,Agriculture and Agri Food Canada | Martin R.A.,Agriculture and Agri Food Canada | Rowsell J.,New Liskeard Agricultural Research Station | Fregeau-Reid J.,Agriculture and Agri Food Canada
Canadian Journal of Plant Science | Year: 2013

AAC Azimuth is a six-row spring feed barley (Hordeum vulgare L.) cultivar developed by the Eastern Canada Barley Breeding Group, Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada. It has high yield, high test weight, high seed weight, resistance to scald and barley yellow dwarf virus, and it accumulates low concentrations of deoxynivalenol in response to Fusarium head blight infection. AAC Azimuth performs well in the province of Ontario.


Choo T.M.,Agriculture and Agri Food Canada | Martin R.A.,Agriculture and Agri Food Canada | Xue A.,Agriculture and Agri Food Canada | MacDonald D.,Dalhousie University | And 4 more authors.
Canadian Journal of Plant Science | Year: 2014

AAC Mirabel is a six-row spring feed barley (Hordeum vulgare L.) cultivar developed by the Eastern Cereal and Oilseed Research Centre, Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada. It has high grain yield and moderate resistance to barley yellow dwarf virus, powdery mildew, leaf rust, and loose smuts. AAC Mirabel performs well across Eastern Canada.


Choo T.M.,Agriculture and Agri Food Canada | Ter Beek S.M.,Agriculture and Agri Food Canada | Martin R.A.,Agriculture and Agri Food Canada | Rowsell J.,New Liskeard Agricultural Research Station
Canadian Journal of Plant Science | Year: 2010

AC Minoa is a two-row; spring feed barley (Hordeum vulgare L.) cultivar developed by the Eastern Canada Barley Breeding Group, Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada. It has high yield, high test weight, and good resistance to powdery mildew and deoxynivalenol accumulation. AC Minoa performs well in the state of New York and in the province of Ontario.


Yan W.,Agriculture and Agri Food Canada | Fregeau-Reid J.,Agriculture and Agri Food Canada | Pageau D.,Agriculture and Agri Food Canada | Martin R.,Agriculture and Agri Food Canada | And 10 more authors.
Crop Science | Year: 2010

The oat (Avena sativa L.) breeding program at the Eastern Cereal and Oilseed Research Centre of Agriculture & Agri-Food Canada has the responsibility to breed new oat cultivars for producers in eastern Canada, which includes Ontario, Quebec, and the Atlantic provinces. A 3-yr multilocation test was conducted to understand the genotype × location interaction patterns and the relationships among test locations in eastern Canada. A genotype + genotype × environment interaction biplot analysis of yield data revealed three distinct oat mega-environments in eastern Canada: (i) northern Ontario, (ii) southern and eastern Ontario, and (iii) Quebec and Atlantic Canada. To breed for all mega-environments, initial yield screening must be conducted at locations representing each of these mega-environments. Based on the relationships among test locations, six essential test locations were identified: three in Ontario, two in Quebec, and one in Atlantic Canada. Testing at all six locations appeared to provide a good coverage of the whole oat-growing area in eastern Canada. Based on these findings, a breeding and test strategy was developed. This includes conducting initial yield screening at three locations in Ontario, Quebec, and Atlantic Canada, followed by a formal yield test at all six essential test locations. Specifically adapted genotypes selected from this test will then be tested in the Registration Tests in their respectively adapted subregions. © Crop Science Society of America.

Loading New Liskeard Agricultural Research Station collaborators
Loading New Liskeard Agricultural Research Station collaborators