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Moscow, Russia

New Economic School, NES is a graduate school of economics in Moscow, Russia. Wikipedia.


Pridemore W.A.,Georgia State University | Chamlin M.B.,Texas State University | Kaylen M.T.,Indiana University Bloomington | Andreev E.,New Economic School
Alcoholism: Clinical and Experimental Research | Year: 2014

Background: The aim of this study was to determine the impact of a set of 2006 Russian alcohol policies on alcohol-related mortality in the country. Methods: We used autoregressive integrated moving average interrupted time series techniques to model the impact of the policy on the number of sex-specific monthly deaths of those aged 15+ years due to alcohol poisoning, alcoholic cardiomyopathy, alcoholic liver cirrhosis, and alcohol-related mental and behavioral disorders. The time series began in January 2000 and ended in December 2010. The alcohol policy was implemented in January 2006. Results: The alcohol policy resulted in a significant gradual and sustained decline in male deaths due to alcohol poisoning (ωo = -92.631, p < 0.008, δ1 = 0.883, p < 0.001) and in significant immediate and sustained declines in male (ω0 = -63.20, p < 0.05) and female (ω0 = -64.28, p < 0.005) deaths due to alcoholic liver cirrhosis. Conclusions: The 2006 suite of alcohol policies in Russia was responsible for an annual decline of about 6,700 male alcohol poisoning deaths and about 760 male and about 770 female alcoholic liver cirrhosis deaths. Without the alcohol policy, male alcohol poisoning deaths would have been 35% higher and male and female alcoholic liver cirrhosis deaths would have been 9 and 15% higher, respectively. We contextualize our findings in relation to declining mortality in Russia and to results from recent studies of the impact of this law on other causes of death. © 2013 by the Research Society on Alcoholism. Source


Pittman R.,U.S. Department of Agriculture | Pittman R.,New Economic School
Utilities Policy | Year: 2011

The Chinese freight railways system has been under capacity pressure and apparently acting as a constraint on continued economic growth for several years now. Earlier government consideration of serious structural reforms has given way to an emphasis on a dramatic expansion of the track network, most conspicuously by construction of high-speed passenger lines to free capacity for freight trains. A good deal of uncertainty remains as to both whether there will be sufficient track capacity to handle the increased volumes of coal and containers necessary for continued growth, and whether the desired private investment funds will be forthcoming so long as the system remains under tight government control. © 2011. Source


Besstremyannaya G.,Keio University | Besstremyannaya G.,New Economic School
Health Economics | Year: 2011

The paper explores the link between managerial performance and cost efficiency of 617 Japanese general local public hospitals in 1999-2007. Treating managerial performance as unobservable heterogeneity, the paper employs a panel data stochastic cost frontier model with latent classes. Financial parameters associated with better managerial performance are found to be positively significant in explaining the probability of belonging to the more efficient latent class. The analysis of latent class membership was consistent with the conjecture that unobservable technological heterogeneity reflected in the existence of the latent classes is related to managerial performance. The findings may support the cause for raising efficiency of Japanese local public hospitals by enhancing the quality of management. Copyright © 2011 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Source


Pridemore W.A.,Georgia State University | Chamlin M.B.,Texas State University | Kaylen M.T.,Indiana University Bloomington | Andreev E.,New Economic School
Addiction | Year: 2013

Aims: To determine the impact of a suite of 2006 Russian alcohol control policies on deaths due to traffic accidents in the country. Design, setting and participants: We used autoregressive integrated moving average (ARIMA) interrupted time-series techniques to model the impact of the intervention on the outcome series. The time-series began in January 2000 and ended in December 2010. The alcohol policy was implemented in January 2006, providing 132 monthly observations in the outcome series, with 72 months of pre-intervention data and 60 months of post-intervention data. Measurements: The outcome variables were the monthly number of male- and female-specific deaths of those aged 15+ years due to transport accidents in Russia. Findings: The 2006 set of alcohol policies had no impact on female deaths due to traffic accidents (ω0=-50.31, P=0.27). However, the intervention model revealed an immediate and sustained monthly decrease of 203 deaths due to transport accidents for males (ω0=-203.40, P=0.04), representing an 11% reduction relative to pre-intervention levels. Conclusion: The implementation of the suite of 2006 Russian alcohol control policies is partially responsible for saving more than 2400 male lives annually that would otherwise have been lost to traffic accidents. © 2013 Society for the Study of Addiction. Source


Andreev E.,New Economic School | Bogoyavlensky D.,Institute for Demography | Stickley A.,University of Stockholm
Alcohol and Alcoholism | Year: 2013

Aims: This study compared the level of alcohol mortality in tsarist and contemporary Russia. Methods: Cross-sectional and annual time-series data from 1870 to 1894, 2008 and 2009 on the mortality rate from deaths due to 'drunkenness' were compared for men in the 50 provinces of tsarist 'European Russia': an area that today corresponds with the territory occupied by the Baltic countries, Belarus, Moldova, Ukraine and the Russian provinces to the west of the Ural Mountains. Results: In 1870-1894, the male death rate from 'drunkenness' in the Russian provinces (15.9 per 100,000) was much higher than in the non-Russian provinces. However, the rate recorded in Russia in the contemporary period was even higher-23.3. Conclusions: Russia has had high levels of alcohol mortality from at least the late 19th century onwards. While a dangerous drinking pattern and spirits consumption may underpin high alcohol mortality across time, the seemingly much higher levels in the contemporary period seem to be also driven by an unprecedented level of consumption, and also possibly, surrogate alcohol use. This study highlights the urgent need to reduce the level of alcohol consumption among the population in order to reduce high levels of alcohol mortality in contemporary Russia. © The Author 2013. Medical Council on Alcohol and Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. Source

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