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News Article | May 3, 2017
Site: www.cnet.com

Technically Incorrect offers a slightly twisted take on the tech that's taken over our lives. There might be several reasons why you'd like to leave Earth in the near future. You might be enthralled by anything that moves Elon Musk. You might be troubled by the erratic nature of today's geopolitics. You might have really enjoyed "The Martian." As far as Stephen Hawking is concerned, everyone had better start making preparations. The astrophysicist has worried before that the Earth's prospects are finite. He's mentioned that the next 100 years might be the most dangerous for our planet. The threats he saw include nuclear war, genetically engineered viruses and global warming. Now, though, citing asteroid strikes and overpopulation as well as his previous fears, he seems firmer about leaving before 2117. Indeed, he's making a TV program in which he begins to examine how we might swiftly take a one-way ticket beyond Earth. As the Telegraph reports, Hawking is making a documentary for the BBC called "Expedition New Earth." It's part of the return of a show called "Tomorrow's World," which was very popular in the last century. Hawking is to claim that we really do have to colonize another planet in the next 100 years -- although he previously thought we wouldn't be able to make such colonies self-sustaining. Now, though, he and his former student Christophe Galfard will travel the world, seeking to discover ways in which humans can begin to prepare for life in outer space. I worry that we're going to do the usual with such things. We'll start a little too late and run out of time. We'll be too busy arguing about who should go first and whether to make all our spacesuits in China or not. Suddenly the world around us will melt or crumble or simply be blown up by a supremely powerful ray from the Planet Plim. You can't, though, fault Hawking for trying to warn us.


News Article | May 3, 2017
Site: news.yahoo.com

Renowned physicist Stephen Hawking has warned that humanity needs to become a multi-planetary species within the next century in order to avoid extinction. Hawking made the prediction in a new documentary called Expedition New Earth, which is set to be released this summer as part of the BBC’s Tomorrow’s World science season. Existential risks include climate change, overpopulation, epidemics and asteroid strikes, according to Hawking. Efforts to create a human colony on Mars are already underway, with billionaire Elon Musk hoping to establish a settlement within the next few decades through his aerospace firm SpaceX. “I don’t have a doomsday prophecy,” Musk said in 2016, “but history suggests some doomsday event will happen.” Hawking predicted last year that the chance of a species-ending event on Earth was a “near certainty” when all possibilities were taken into consideration. Don't miss: Justice in America: One in Five Black Prisoners Is Serving Life Sentence “Although the chance of disaster to planet Earth in a given year may be quite low, it adds up over time, and becomes a near certainty in the next 1,000 or 10,000 years,” Hawking told the Oxford University Union in November. “By that time, we should have spread out into space and to other stars, so a disaster on Earth would not mean the end of the human race.” Despite the dire warning, Hawking did have some positive news for the assembled students. He pointed to how our fundamental understanding of the universe has advanced in his lifetime and said it is a “glorious time to be alive and doing research into theoretical physics.” He added: “Our picture of the universe has changed a great deal in the last 50 years and I am happy if I have made a small contribution. The fact that we humans, who are ourselves mere fundamental particles of nature, have been able to come this close to understanding the laws that govern us and the universe is certainly a triumph.”


Humans need to colonize another planet within 100 years or face the threat of extinction, high-profile physicist Stephen Hawking has warned. In a new BBC documentary called "Stephen Hawking: Expedition New Earth" set to air later this year, the professor will "present his predictions that the human race only has 100 years before we need to colonize another planet," a press release from earlier this week said. "With climate change, overdue asteroid strikes, epidemics and population growth, our own planet is increasingly precarious." Previously, Hawking theorized that humanity probably has around 1,000 years left before it becomes extinct. His timeline appears now to have shortened. The famous physicist has issued a number of warnings about the future over the past few years. At the start of 2016, Hawking warned about the dangers from nuclear war, global warming, genetically-engineered viruses and artificial intelligence (AI). "Although the chance of a disaster to planet Earth in a given year may be quite low, it adds up over time, and becomes a near certainty in the next thousand or ten thousand years," Hawking told the BBC in an interview at the time. "By that time we should have spread out into space, and to other stars, so a disaster on Earth would not mean the end of the human race," he added. "However, we will not establish self-sustaining colonies in space for at least the next hundred years, so we have to be very careful in this period." Hawking is not the only major figure in the technology and science world that has warned about the threat to human existence. Earlier this year, billionaire Elon Musk said humans must somehow merge with machines or risk becoming irrelevant in the age of AI. The Tesla (NASDAQ: TSLA) and SpaceX founder is working on a company called Neuralink to do just that. Alibaba (NYSE: BABA) founder Jack Ma, meanwhile, also recently warned that society could face decades of "pain" because of the disruption caused by new technology and the internet.


In another apocalyptic prediction, renowned physicist Stephen Hawking said that humans cannot survive on the planet beyond 100 years as threats of extinction mount. This has turned attention to new space technologies that can help in rapid transport and exploration of new habitable planets. According to Hawking, the terrestrial risks include climate change, overpopulation, epidemics, and asteroid strikes. Hawking's advice to humanity to become a multi-planetary species within the next century was made in the documentary Stephen Hawking: Expedition New Earth under the Tomorrow's World by BBC. In the documentary, the famed physicist looks at the current technologies that can assist in colonizing new planets. Hawking's new prediction scales down the time frame of human extinction from that of the 2016 prophecy, which said humans will last another 1,000 years. In the documentary, Hawking probes the technological advances in astronomy, biology, and rocket technology to reach out to new planets including Mars. The futuristic technologies being discussed include plasma rockets and human hibernation. Hawking is looking at human colonization of moon and Mars as a hedge against any catastrophe on Earth that may erase the human species. Lecturing at the 50th anniversary of NASA in 2008, Hawking had said Mars was "the obvious next target" for human colonization. However, colonizing new planets on a rapid scale needs the greater pace of advanced technologies for safe transport, communications, habitat, food, healthcare, etc. In the documentary, Hawking and his colleagues explored how humans can reach different planets. It also showed that Hawking's ambition is not just a fantasy, and the plan on occupying other planets is becoming a reality. The human mission to Mars is already in progress. Billionaire Elon Musk has also announced that his company SpaceX would establish a settlement on Mars in the coming decades. There is considerable progress in the technologies required for the Mars mission. A transit vehicle with two propellant stages will be driving the spacecraft carrying the crew backed by a landing module and transit habitat. The transit habitat will be a mini space station where radiation shelter will serve as sleeping quarters for the crew. On arrival at the planet Mars, the crew will touch down on the Martian surface in Mars suits. Many of the vital hardware for Mars settlement has already been designed and is under test. Suppliers such as Lockheed Martin are working on landing modules. Development of Life Support Units for generating energy, water, and breathable air is also underway. The living units will be outfitted with deployable inflatable habitats and carry solar panels, spare parts, and other components. Rovers: Rovers will precede human mission to Mars and establish outposts before the humans arrive. They will scout for the right location at Martian surface for settlement and carry hardware components as well. Mars Suits: The suits will check radiation from the Mars atmosphere and protect the astronauts from high temperatures and risks of thin atmosphere. Communications systems will involve satellites and Earth ground stations that will receive data from Mars to Earth and back. Though Mars has become an obvious choice for colonization, it is not exactly Earth. The challenges include toxic soil, cold conditions, and air unfit for breathing. Moreover, dependence on packages from Earth for the Martian colony will be another risk. Explaining the rationale of the BBC program of Hawking, BBC director-general Tony Hall said science has been changing the world at an extraordinary pace and the audience must know the new developments. The surge of robotics, demise of antibiotics, and Mars expedition are some examples of that. © 2017 Tech Times, All rights reserved. Do not reproduce without permission.


News Article | May 4, 2017
Site: www.techradar.com

World renowned physicist Stephen Hawking has issued a warning that humans need to colonize other planets in order to guarantee survival from a variety of threats. The warning comes as part of the new series of Tomorrow’s World, a revamp of the successful British TV show that addressed how advances in science and technology stood to shape the future. Tomorrow’s World ran for 38 years until 2003. Now it’s back, with a broad spectrum of programming all being commissioned under the title. One of the programs is Stephen Hawking: Expedition New Earth, in which Professor Hawking posits his theory that interplanetary colonization is necessary to ensure the survival of the human race. With climate change, overpopulation, possible asteroid strikes, and the rise of unpredictable technology like artificial intelligence, a world-ending event occurring in the next century is not unimaginable. In order to safeguard the continuation of the human race, it makes sense to have a second base. Mars and the Moon, as our nearest neighbours, are two of the possible options for where we could move, but would of course require significant development before they were habitable on a large scale. Thinking of planets that are currently habitable, there is the possibility that one of the seven planets recently found in the Trappist 1 system could be viable as our new home. The only problem is they're quite far away – 39 light years away to be precise, and with current technology it would take thousands of years to reach them. Tesla Founder Elon Musk’s Space X program is already working on methods for creating reusable craft with the aim of establishing interplanetary human existence, so Professor Hawking isn’t the only person thinking about these possibilities. But it will be very interesting to hear what one of our planet’s greatest minds has to say on the subject.


News Article | May 4, 2017
Site: www.chromatographytechniques.com

Stephen Hawking is one of the most influential minds of the 20th and 21st centuries. But besides theoretical physics, he also knows how to grab a headline. Hawking says humanity only has a century left on this planet before life as we know it comes to an end, as he relates in a coming BBC2 television special, entitled “Expedition New Earth.” The special, scheduled to air in June, is part of a reboot of the long-running BBC series called “Tomorrow’s World” focused on science, which was canceled 14 years ago but is making a high-profile reappearance this summer. Climate change, asteroids, disease and overpopulation are all problems that will overcome humanity on Earth in the coming 100 years, according to reports based on the special. Hawking and one of his former students will reportedly travel the world on the hour-long special to explore how life beyond the Earth may be possible. The timeline is somewhat of a reversal for Hawking, who is known for his big predictions on the future of Homo sapiens. Hawking made a speech at Oxford University in November, which held that humans had a full 1,000 years left on this planet. The noted physicist had previously stated that science itself would be humanity’s undoing. He said last January that there is “near certainty” that scientific advances would end human history, either through nuclear war, global warming, artificial intelligence, genetically-engineered viruses, or other unforeseen developments. “Most of the threats we face come from the progress we’ve made in science and technology,” he said at the time. But humanity had as long as 10,000 years left on the planet before that would happen, he said at that point. Space colonization is the hope for our species, he added. By spreading out to other planets or solar systems, humanity would be able to survive, he said. Hawking is not alone in his fears. Another iconic name in science, Elon Musk, has expressed similar worries. Musk contends that another world war is inevitable, and the “window” for Mars colonization would be over once the international community is no longer working cooperatively to work toward that goal, he said in late 2015. Musk is also one of the foremost players in pushing toward exploration of space, especially Mars, through his company SpaceX.


News Article | May 3, 2017
Site: news.yahoo.com

We need to build a thriving space colony within the next 100 years if humans are going to avoid extinction, according to astrophysicist Stephen Hawking. The Telegraph reported that Hawking makes that argument in his new documentary, Expedition New Earth, for the recently revived BBC series Tomorrow’s World. “In it he will claim that time is running out for Earth and if humanity is to survive … we will need to leave our planet and venture further afield,” the publication explained, adding that the documentary shows Hawking and one of his former students traveling the world “to find out how humans could live in outer space.” It’s not the first time Hawking has made an extreme claim about the future of humanity and life on Earth. One of his more recent declarations was that a genetically engineered virus — one that has been made or modified at a genetic level — was going to kill us all. Doctors are developing these viruses to treat illnesses because they can be used to target specific cells, like cancer cells, and have the potential to cure many diseases. But while these engineered viruses could be lifesaving on a single patient basis, they could be fatal on a larger scale if they are mishandled. Any offspring they would unintentionally make with their natural counterparts would be unpredictable, and could make a disease stronger or even immune to modern medical treatments. And there is the risk of a virus getting out of laboratory containment and spreading through the population, a situation that has happened before, although on a small scale. When Hawking previously warned against the dangers of a genetically engineered virus, however, he didn’t give humans such a short amount of time to escape Earth. “I don’t think we will survive another 1,000 years without escaping beyond our fragile planet,” he said at the time, while calling for stronger space travel and colonization efforts. On top of the risk of a deadly, engineered virus leaking into public spaces, there are also the environmental dangers of climate change, nuclear war, the potential of an enormous asteroid strike wiping us out, and the problem of humanity’s overpopulation of the planet, just to name a few of the biggest challenges when it comes to remaining on Earth. 9 Places on Earth That Are A Lot Like Mars These Countries Want to Land on a Mars Moon


News Article | February 28, 2017
Site: www.marketwired.com

NEW YORK, NY--(Marketwired - February 28, 2017) - SPYR, Inc.'s ( : SPYR) investors should be growing more and more confident with the company as it becomes more clear that 2017 could be the year that SPYR takes a giant leap forward in its evolution in the games industry. With its latest hire, SPYR should earn more credibility among industry leaders. Farshid Almassizadeh, who has joined SPYR as its Chief Strategic Advisor, is a 25-year veteran of the computer, video, and mobile gaming industries, and a former senior executive at gaming giant Electronic Arts (EA). Almassizadeh is well known across a number of industries and his world-class resume leads one to wonder what big plans SPYR has for 2017 and beyond. One thing is for sure with this hire, SPYR will benefit greatly from having Farshid Almassizadeh as part of its team. After all, Almassizadeh spent almost a decade as a top-level executive with one of the biggest names in gaming -- Electronic Arts, so SPYR will now have all of that knowledge and expertise and his access to what can only be a "Who's Who" of contacts in the computer, video and mobile gaming industries at its disposal. While at Electronic Arts, Almassizadeh was the Vice President and Chief Operating Officer (COO) at EA Interactive, a $1.2 billion multi-national division of EA responsible for mobile, online, and social gaming. He also worked as the Senior Director of Product Development at EA where he was responsible for the development of such popular EA titles as "The Simpsons Game" series and "The Sims" series of games. Commenting on the company's new Chief Strategic Advisor, James R. Thompson, SPYR's CEO and President, said, "Farshid brings SPYR the highest credibility we could possibly hope to have, a level that can only be achieved by a remarkable 25-year career in the games industry. Farshid is a games industry rock star and we could not be more proud to have him on board as our Chief Strategic Advisor. "He is a true industry veteran having been there from its very early days. He is a developer and a publisher, and he has experience with all manner of games companies from start-ups to those among the industry's largest." Interestingly, Almassizadeh is on the advisory board of a number of impressive companies in the entertainment industry including Halon Entertainment and Matter vr. One is a leading special effects company for some of Hollywood's biggest films, television commercials, and games, and the other is a virtual reality company headed up by award winning leaders in film, television & gaming. Halon Entertainment is a leading special effects company with credits in more than 80 Hollywood movies including; Kong: Skull Island, The Great Wall, Logan: The Wolverine, Deepwater Horizon, The Hunger Games, Star Wars, Life of Pi, Jurassic Park, The Twilight Saga: Breaking Dawn 1 & 2, and Avatar. Halon has also worked on television commercials and content for such games as Halo 3, Halo: Reach, League of Legends -- The Harrowing, Destiny, Mass Effect: New Earth, XCom2, The Division, and Evolve. Meanwhile, Matter vr is a virtual reality content company that created the world's first historical VR experience curated by the Smithsonian. In early February, SPYR released a shareholder update where it discussed the company's plans for 2017. SPYR said its overarching goal for this year and beyond is to become a premier, diversified mobile games publisher, deriving revenue from games in various genres and appealing to multiple demographics. We believe unquestionably that Farshid Almassizadeh can play an integral role in helping SPYR accomplish their overarching goal, but we also feel that he can play a major role in two other areas that the company highlighted in its update to shareholders: SPYR said it would continue to seek out new publishing agreements for new game titles in various stages of development. SPYR will be considering games in a diverse field of genres with the goal of creating a portfolio of games that appeals to multiple demographics, resulting in a regular and consistent revenue stream. SPYR said it has been and will continue to search out Hollywood Intellectual Property (IP) to enhance the revenue and exposure of Pocket Starships and its other published titles. Thompson said of SPYR's path forward with Farshid Almassizadeh, "We expect Farshid's advice and guidance to enable us to sign publishing deals that would otherwise be out of our reach as a relatively new player in the industry, as well as helping us more quickly find the needles in the haystack that you need to find in order to be a successful electronic games publisher." Needless to say, SPYR hit a grand slam with the hiring of Farshid Almassizadeh. Now the question remains -- just how big a leap can SPYR make in its evolution in the games industry with Almassizadeh as its Chief Strategic Advisor? Stock Market Media Group is a Content Development IR firm offering a platform for corporate stories to unfold in the media with research reports, corporate videos, CEO interviews and feature news articles. Stock Market Media Group is an exclusive publisher for news, updates, alerts and information on SPYR, Inc. ["SPYR"]. Our publications about SPYR are based solely upon SPYR's authorized press releases, and SPYR's legal disclosures made in SPYR's filings with the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission. Before we publish any SPYR related content, our articles undergo compliance reviews and factual verifications, including written confirmation of the facts we publish from SPYR, and separately from SPYR's Legal Counsel for Securities and Regulatory compliance, Mailander Law Office, Inc. Separate from the confirmed factual content of our articles about SPYR, we may from time to time include our own opinions about SPYR, its business, markets and opportunities. Any opinions we may offer about SPYR are solely our own, and are made in reliance upon our rights under the First Amendment to the U.S. Constitution, and are provided solely for the general opinionated discussion of our readers. Our opinions should not be considered to be complete, precise, accurate, or current investment advice, or construed or interpreted as research. Any investment decisions you may make concerning SPYR or any other securities are solely your responsibility based on your own due diligence. Our publications about SPYR are provided only as an informational aid, and as a starting point for doing additional independent research. We encourage you to invest carefully and read the investor information available at the web site of the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission at: www.sec.gov, where you can also find all of SPYR's filings and disclosures. We also recommend, as a general rule, that before investing in any securities you consult with a professional financial planner or advisor, and you should conduct a complete and independent investigation before investing in any security after prudent consideration of all pertinent risks. We are not a registered broker, dealer, analyst, or adviser. We hold no investment licenses and may not sell, offer to sell or offer to buy any security. Our publications about SPYR are not a recommendation to buy or sell a security. Section 17(b) of the 1933 Securities and Exchange Act requires publishers who distribute information about publicly traded securities for compensation, to disclose who paid them, the amount, and the type of payment. In order to be in full compliance with the Securities Act of 1933, Section 17(b), we are disclosing that we entered into a contract with SPYR for one year on February 1, 2015. We agreed to publish articles, news, updates, alerts and information about SPYR, subject to SPYR's written confirmation of factual content, and the separate confirmation of factual content by SPYR's Legal Counsel for Securities and Regulatory Compliance. In exchange for our services, SPYR agreed to compensate us with a monthly fee of $5,000.00. Additionally, SPYR agreed to issue to us 250,000 shares of SPYR's Restricted Common Stock. Our rights to sell any of this Restricted Common Stock are subject to prior compliance with all U.S. Securities Laws, including but not limited to Rule 144. Further, our sale of any of the Restricted Common Stock is subject to a volume restriction providing that we may only sell 5,000 shares daily for every 250,000 shares of daily trading volume.


News Article | December 10, 2015
Site: phys.org

Admittedly, once radio telescopes began to make the first inroads into the invisible regions of the electromagnetic spectrum, the game changed. Today, there's no portion of that universal hum of radiation that is off-limits to ground- or space-based telescopes. But optical astronomy – the old-fashioned kind, using visible light – still reigns supreme. Today's optical astronomers are able to glean the most astonishing information from starlight. For example, with exotic calibration tools like iodine cells and laser combs, they can measure a star's speed with a precision better than one metre per second – a slow walking pace. Over time, this miniscule Doppler shift can reveal the existence of orbiting exoplanets by the wobble they induce on their parent stars. More exciting still are the possibilities offered by the coming generation of Extremely Large Telescopes, which will boast mirrors larger than 20 metres in diameter. Within the next ten years, astronomers will have the capability not only to see the distant exoplanets directly, but also to detect signatures of life in their atmospheres. The discovery of any such biomarkers would profoundly alter the way we see ourselves, and our place in space. With optical astronomy on the brink of a new golden age, it's no idle boast that the sky is, indeed, the limit. The threat to the night sky But that's the problem. In optical astronomy, the sky really is the limit. When astronomers observe celestial objects, they see them superimposed on the natural luminous background of the night sky. The Earth's rarefied upper atmosphere contributes to this, as its air molecules relax after a hard day in the sun. There's also light from sunlit dust in the solar system, together with a faint background of light from myriad distant stars and galaxies. Pushing to observe ever-fainter celestial bodies, astronomers are sometimes measuring objects whose brightness is only one percent greater than the natural night-time skyglow. So you can easily imagine what happens if the night sky is polluted by artificial light from towns, cities and industrial complexes. The faint objects simply disappear. For this reason, astronomers site their giant telescopes well away from centres of population. Australia's national observatory, for example – a A$100 million infrastructure investment – is located at Siding Spring Mountain in the Warrumbungle Range, 350km from Sydney. But due to the scattering of light by the Earth's atmosphere, remoteness is no guarantee of darkness, and from Siding Spring, the glow of Sydney can clearly be seen on the horizon. That light-scattering process turns out to be much more efficient for the blue component of light than for its red component. That's why the sky is blue; sunlight's blue constituent is very effectively scattered in all directions. But the same is true for artificial light. Light with a high blue content (think of those intense white LED headlights now seen everywhere on our roads) makes a bigger contribution to light pollution than warmer, cream-coloured light. Is this all about astronomy? No, it's not just astronomers who fall victim to light pollution. Many nocturnal animal species – principally birds and insects – are disturbed by the skyglow of cities, sometimes resulting in large numbers of fatalities. Recent studies suggest that in the US, up to a billion birds are killed each year by becoming disoriented by city lights. And the poster child of the dark-sky movement is the loggerhead turtle, whose hatchlings are confused by urban lighting as they seek the lines of surf that mark their route to a safe ocean habitat. Research shows that humans, too, can suffer debilitating effects from an excessively bright nocturnal environment, with shift workers at particular risk. The recent discovery of a third light-sensing system in the human eye (a layer of ganglion cells in front of the retina) links the secretion of the sleep-inducing hormone melatonin to an absence of light. A new study suggests that while humans in the pre-industrial world probably didn't sleep any more than we do, the longer periods of darkness they experienced led to more restorative sleep. Moreover, the artificial light available to our forebears was always the orange light of a flame, rather than the daylight-mimicking lighting available today. Used at the wrong time – for example, late at night – such blue-rich illumination can seriously disrupt circadian rhythms. Perhaps the most compelling reason for taking a good look at light pollution is the cost of waste upward light, its effect on both the hip pocket and the atmosphere. Light fittings that are meant to illuminate surfaces such as roadways, sportsgrounds, parking lots and building facades often have a high upward component, sometimes putting more than 40 percent of their output into the night sky. Even the humble backyard light is frequently tilted to extend its area of coverage, causing a high proportion of its light to radiate uselessly upwards. It's estimated that in the US alone, upward light-spill from all these sources wastes some US$3.3 billion annually, with a resulting greenhouse gas emission from fossil fuels of about 21 million tonnes CO₂ equivalent. Not surprisingly, it is observatories that have led the crusade against light pollution. The peak advocacy body for good outdoor lighting - the International Dark Sky Association (IDA) – had its origins in the 1980s, when astronomers at major US observatories became alarmed by night-sky degradation. Large telescopes are major investments and need complete freedom from light pollution. But the IDA is not just for astronomers – it's for everyone. And so, the association has launched its International Dark Sky Places program, which recognises the planet's accessible, pristine skies. A handful have qualified worldwide. The IDA also acknowledges communities with "exceptional dedication to the preservation of the night sky". Our national observatory at Siding Spring is close to the beautiful Warrumbungle National Park. It is already a dark site, protected by state legislation, and an obvious candidate for Australia's first IDA-recognised Dark Sky Park. With support from local communities and the National Parks and Wildlife Service, the Siding Spring Observatory is working towards that recognition. There are some in the dark sky lobby who are driven to despair by the spread of urban and industrial lighting, but my own view is more optimistic. Yes, we have cities with high levels of upward light-spill, but they are largely a product of a bygone era, when lighting was designed with no thought for the environment. Today's outdoor lighting designers are gifted with an extraordinary array of light sources, such as LEDs, that are eminently controllable in direction, colour and intensity, allowing them to create efficient, effective and elegant lighting without contaminating the night sky. A recent meeting of lighting designers at Sydney Observatory sent out a clear message – to make a city beautiful and safe, you don't need to light up absolutely everything. Astronomers and dark sky advocates have no wish to see city streetscapes turned into dim and uninteresting places. It's the direct upward light-spill that is the problem, and that can be mitigated by the use of properly shielded lighting. If it also has a low blue-content, so much the better – for both the environment and ourselves. With growing environmental awareness, there's also public support for a reduction in waste light, with its consequent greenhouse footprint. I believe the cities of the future will be less polluting than those of today in every respect – including their artificial sky-glow. The real challenge is winning the hearts and minds of everyone concerned with outdoor lighting. That's one reason why I'm so enthusiastic about the IYL – it's a great opportunity to publicise the best of modern sky-friendly lighting design. And, yes, one of the principal legacy items of this International Year of Light might, indeed, turn out to be darkness. Just enough darkness to enable all of us to reconnect with the starry skies of our marvellous country. Explore further: New Earth at night images reveal global light pollution problem


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New Earth | Date: 2013-01-13

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