Neutrogena Corporation

Saint Helena, CA, United States

Neutrogena Corporation

Saint Helena, CA, United States
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Ou-Yang H.,Neutrogena Corporation | Stanfield J.,Suncare Research Laboratories LLC | Cole C.,Johnson and Johnson Consumer Companies Inc. | Appa Y.,Neutrogena Corporation | Rigel D.,New York University
Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology | Year: 2012

Background: The manner in which consumers apply sunscreens is often inadequate for ultraviolet protection according to the labeled sun protection factor (SPF). Although sunscreen SPFs are labeled by testing at an application density of 2 mg/cm2, the actual protection received is often substantially less because of consumer application densities ranging from 0.5 to 1 mg/cm2. High-SPF sunscreens may provide more adequate protection even when applied by consumers at inadequate amounts. Objective: We sought to measure the actual SPF values of various sunscreens (labeled SPF 30-100) applied in amounts typical of those used by consumers. Methods: Actual SPF values were measured on human volunteers for 6 sunscreen products with labeled SPF values ranging from 30 to 100, applied at 0.5, 1.0, 1.5, and 2.0 mg/cm2. Results: There was a linear relationship between application density and the actual SPF; sunscreens with labeled SPF values of 70 and above provided significant protection, even at the low application densities typically applied by consumers. Sunscreens labeled SPF 70 and 100 applied at 0.5 mg/cm2 provided an actual SPF value of, respectively, 19 and 27. Limitations: The study was conducted in a laboratory setting under standardized conditions and results are extrapolated to actual in-use situations. Conclusion: Sunscreens with SPF 70 and above add additional clinical benefits when applied by consumers at typically used amounts, by delivering an actual SPF that meets the minimum SPF levels recommended for skin cancer and photodamage prevention. In contrast, sunscreens with SPF 30 or 50 may not produce sufficient protection at actual consumer usage levels.


Cole C.,Johnson and Johnson Consumer and Personal Products Inc. | Appa Y.,Neutrogena Corporation | Ou-Yang H.,Johnson and Johnson Consumer and Personal Products Inc.
Photodermatology Photoimmunology and Photomedicine | Year: 2014

Background: Advances in sunscreen technologies have yielded broad spectrum sunscreens at high-sun protection factor (SPF) and ultraviolet A protection factor (UVA-PF) levels that are photostable and powerful in protecting skin from erythema. Questions arise whether these sunscreens protect proportionally against cellular skin damage caused by high ultraviolet exposures. Objective: The objective of this study is to evaluate if high-SPF sunscreen can protect skin at a cellular level under UV exposure doses [>50 minimal erythema dose (MED)] similarly to the SPF value. Methods: Sunburn cells, Langerhans cells, thymine dimers, protein 53 (p53), and matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-1 and MMP-9 endpoints were evaluated in biopsies from 12 subjects following four treatments: unprotected exposed to 0, 1 and 3 MED and sunscreen (SPF 55) protected exposed to 55 MED of UV radiation. Results: All the markers showed significantly more damage for the 3 MED-untreated sites when compared with non-irradiated control, and majority of the markers showed marked damage following unprotected 1 MED exposure. After 55 MEDs, sunscreen-protected sites showed significantly less p53 and MMP-9 (keratinocyte) staining than the 1 MED-exposed unprotected sites, while all the other biomarkers in sunscreen protected sites showed no statistical differences from 1 MED-exposed unprotected sites. Conclusions: A high-SPF photostable sunscreen with high UVA-PF can provide proportionately high protection against multiple cellular damage markers. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.


Trademark
Neutrogena Corporation | Date: 2013-01-08

Facial moisturizer, facial eye cream, facial serum, and facial anti-aging treatments.


Patent
Neutrogena Corporation | Date: 2012-03-07

Sunscreen compositions containing a discontinuous oil phase dispersed in a continuous water phase, at least 10% by weight of an organic UV-filter, a water-insoluble, C_(2)-C_(8), liquid silicone, a branched fatty acid ester of a polyprotic carboxylic acid; and at least 2% by weight of a mineral particulate having a starch coating applied to the surface thereof.


Trademark
Neutrogena Corporation | Date: 2012-11-27

Sunblocks and sunscreens.


Trademark
Neutrogena Corporation | Date: 2012-11-27

Sunblocks and sunscreens.


Trademark
Neutrogena Corporation | Date: 2012-05-16

Sunblocks; cosmetic preparations for protecting the skin from the suns rays.


Trademark
Neutrogena Corporation | Date: 2013-02-14

Ingredients that provide sunscreen protection, sold as an integral component of sun protection and self-tanning preparations, namely, sunblock cream, sunblock lotion, sunblock liquid, sunblock spray, sunblock gel, skin bronzing cream, spray and lotion, body moisturizing cream and lotion and facial moisturizing cream and lotion.


Trademark
Neutrogena Corporation | Date: 2013-02-14

Ingredients that provide sunscreen protection, sold as an integral component of sun protection and self-tanning preparations, namely, sunblock cream, sunblock lotion, sunblock liquid, sunblock spray, sunblock gel, skin bronzing cream, spray and lotion, body moisturizing cream and lotion and facial moisturizing cream and lotion.


Trademark
Neutrogena Corporation | Date: 2012-10-23

Cream facial cleanser, gel facial and body cleanser, facial and body scrub, combination facial cleanser/mask, facial cleansing wipes, sport body wash, sport facial cleanser, and pre-moistened cosmetic facial cleansing pads.

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