Cleveland, OH, United States
Cleveland, OH, United States

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Mon S.Y.,Medicine Institute | Alkabbani A.,Endocrinology and Metabolism Institute | Hamrahian A.,Endocrinology and Metabolism Institute | Thorton J.N.,Cleveland Clinic | And 6 more authors.
Pituitary | Year: 2013

Prolactin has been proposed as a potent coactivator of platelet aggregation, possibly contributing to thromboembolic events. The objective of the study was to evaluate the relationship between prolactinoma and deep vein thrombosis (DVT), pulmonary embolism (PE), and cerebrovascular accident (CVA). Subjects were identified from a prospectively maintained pituitary database at the Cleveland Clinic. We retrospectively reviewed the charts of 544 subjects: 347 patients with prolactinomas (prolactinoma group) and 197 patients with nonfunctional pituitary adenomas (control group). Main outcome measures were DVT, PE and CVA. We found that 19 (5.5 %) patients in the prolactinoma group and five (2.5 %) patients in the control group had documented DVT, PE, or CVA, but this difference was not significant (p = 0.109). However, the mean initial prolactin level was higher at the time of diagnosis among prolactinoma patients than among controls (815.23 ng/ml vs. 15.90 ng/ml; p < 0.001). Among prolactinoma patients, 15 (5.5 %) of 275 patients who underwent medical treatment (with cabergoline, bromocriptine, pergolide and/or other drug) and 4 (5.6 %) of 72 patients who underwent transsphenoidal surgery had documented DVT, PE, or CVA, which suggests that dopaminergic therapy did not influence the risk of thromboembolic events. Hyperprolactinemia per se does not appear to predispose to a hypercoagulable state. © 2012 Springer Science+Business Media New York.


News Article | February 22, 2017
Site: www.prweb.com

Becker’s Spine Review, the leading publication featuring news and analysis of issues related to spine practices, is featuring Michigan neurosurgeon Jay Jagannathan, M.D., as a “Spine Surgeon to Know.” http://www.beckersspine.com/spine-leaders/item/35348-. Dr. Jagannathan is known as one of a small number of neurosurgeons in Michigan performing minimally invasive back surgery that often results in less post-operative discomfort and a quicker recovery for patients. Dr. Jagannathan founded and heads the Jagannathan Neurosurgical Institute – http://www.mi-neurosurgery.com – with clinical-office locations in the Detroit area (Madison Heights, Garden City, Dearborn and soon in Troy), central Michigan (West Branch) and far-northern Michigan (Sault Sainte Marie). The practice has specialists in neurosurgery, neurology and pain management and provides interdisciplinary treatment for patients with spine and other neurological disorders throughout the state of Michigan. “It is a great honor to be featured by Becker’s Spine Review,” said Dr. Jagannathan of the Jagannathan Neurosurgical Institute. “We are recognized for the specialty expertise in minimally invasive spine surgery, which our patients really appreciate, and also our unusual reach in the state of Michigan – with office locations and my ability and willingness to travel to be nearby just about anyone in Michigan, regardless of where they live in the state.” Dr. Jagannathan is a Diplomate of the American Board of Neurological Surgery, the American Academy of Neurological and Orthopedic Surgery and the American Board of Spinal Surgery. He has been a “Featured Neurosurgeon” in Hour Detroit magazine’s ‘Top Docs’ issue in 2014, 2015 and 2016. He received the Patients’ Choice Award and Compassionate Doctor Recognition from Vitals.com in 2014, 2015 and 2016. In 2016 he was rated the Top Neurosurgeon in Metro Detroit by RateMDs.com. Dr. Jagannathan received his M.D. degree from the University of Maryland School of Medicine. His neurosurgery residency was at the University of Virginia Health Sciences Center and the Wayne State University School of Medicine where he was Chief Resident. He is a Fellow of the American Association of Neurological Surgeons. Dr. Jagannathan has published numerous papers and book chapters in the areas of spine surgery, radiosurgery and neuro-oncology and has been the recipient of numerous awards including the Synthes Award for craniofacial research as well as the Cone Pevehouse Award for socioeconomic research, both from the American Association of Neurological Surgeons. He was named a ‘rising star’ in spine surgery by In-Spine magazine. He is actively involved in organized neurosurgery and served as a member of the American Association of Neurological Surgeons (AANS) Young Neurosurgeons Committee and on the Executive Committee of the Section on Tumors. He also represented Michigan on the Council of State Neurosurgical Societies.


News Article | February 25, 2017
Site: www.prweb.com

The February 13, 2017, assassination of Kim Jong-nam, the half brother of North Korea’s leader Kim Jong-un, heightened awareness and concern over nerve agents and the deadly use of chemical weapons. Many questions exist about the effect that nerve agents can have on the human nervous system and how even small doses can be lethal. Jay Jagannathan, M.D., of Michigan-based Jagannathan Neurosurgical Institute, and one of the United States’ most prominent neurosurgeons, is available to news media to provide his medical expertise and analysis. News journalists interested in interviewing Dr. Jagannathan should contact Jeff Caponigro at (248) 353-3270 or email jcap(at)caponigro.com. Law-enforcement officials report that Kim Jong-nam was killed at the Kuala Lumpur International Airport in Malaysia by two women who covered his face with the VX nerve agent. One drop of VX, or about 10 milligrams, can be lethal. “In general terms, such a nerve agent prevents the proper functioning of glands and muscles that are necessary for normal breathing,” said Dr. Jagannathan. “Even  a tiny dose of a neurotoxin such as VX can paralyze muscles and cause respiratory arrest.” Dr. Jagannathan is a Diplomate of the American Board of Neurological Surgery, the American Academy of Neurological and Orthopedic Surgery and the American Board of Spinal Surgery. He has been a “Featured Neurosurgeon” in Hour Detroit magazine’s ‘Top Docs’ issue in 2014, 2015 and 2016. He received the Patients’ Choice Award and Compassionate Doctor Recognition from Vitals.com in 2014, 2015 and 2016. In 2016 he was rated the Top Neurosurgeon in Metro Detroit by RateMDs.com. Dr. Jagannathan received his M.D. degree from the University of Maryland School of Medicine. His neurosurgery residency was at the University of Virginia Health Sciences Center and the Wayne State University School of Medicine where he was Chief Resident. He is a Fellow of the American Association of Neurological Surgeons. Dr. Jagannathan has published numerous papers and book chapters in the areas of spine surgery, radiosurgery and neuro-oncology and has been the recipient of numerous awards including the Synthes Award for craniofacial research as well as the Cone Pevehouse Award for socioeconomic research, both from the American Association of Neurological Surgeons. He was named a ‘rising star’ in spine surgery by In-Spine magazine. He is actively involved in organized neurosurgery and served as a member of the American Association of Neurological Surgeons (AANS) Young Neurosurgeons Committee and on the Executive Committee of the Section on Tumors. He also represented Michigan on the Council of State Neurosurgical Societies. Media Contact: Jeff Caponigro at Caponigro Public Relations Inc., jcap(at)caponigro.com or (248) 353-3270.

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