Neuron Experts SAS

Marseille, France

Neuron Experts SAS

Marseille, France
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Callizot N.,Neuron Experts SAS | Combes M.,Neuron Experts SAS | Steinschneider R.,Neuron Experts SAS | Poindron P.,Neuron Experts SAS
Journal of Neuroscience Research | Year: 2013

Alzheimer disease (AD) affects mainly people over the age of 65 years, suffering from different clinical symptoms such as progressive decline in memory, thinking, language, and learning capacity. The toxic role of β-amyloid peptide (Aβ) has now shifted from insoluble Aβ fibrils to smaller, soluble oligomeric Aβ aggregates. The urgent need for efficient new therapies is high; robust models dissecting the physiopathological aspects of the disease are needed. We present here a model allowing study of four cytopathic effects of Aβ oligomers (AβO): oxidative stress, loss of synapses, disorganization of the neurite network, and cellular death. By generating a solution of AβO and playing on the concentration of and time of exposure to AβO, we have shown that it was possible to reproduce early effects (oxidative stress) and the long-term development of structural alterations (death of neurons). We have shown that 1) all toxic events were linked to AβO according to a specific timing and pathway and 2) AβO were probably the key intermediates in AD pathogenesis. The present model, using Aβ peptide solution containing AβO, reproduced essential neuropathological features of AD; the effects involved were similar whatever the kind of neurons tested (cortical vs. hippocampal). By using a single system, it was possible to embrace all toxic mechanisms at defined times and concentrations, to study each involved pathway, and to study the effects of new molecules on the different neurotoxic pathways responsible for development of AD. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.


Callizot N.,Neuron Experts SAS | Combes M.,Neuron Experts SAS | Steinschneider R.,Neuron Experts SAS | Poindron P.,Neuron Experts SAS
Experimental Cell Research | Year: 2011

Besides in vivo models, co-cultures systems making use of Rat dorsal root ganglion explants/Schwann cells (SC) are widely used to essentially study myelination in vitro. In the case of animal models of demyelinating diseases, it is expected to reproduce a pathological process; conversely the co-cultures are primarily developed to study the myelination process and in the aim to use them to replace animals in experiences of myelin destruction or functional disturbances. We describe (in terms of protein expression kinetic) a new in vitro model of sensory neurons/SC co-cultures presenting the following advantages: both sensory neurons and SC originate from the same individual; sensory neurons and SC being dissociated, they can be co-cultured in monolayer, allowing an easier microscope observation; the co-culture can be maintained in a serum-free medium for at less three months, allowing kinetic studies of myelin formation both at a molecular and cellular level. Optimizing culture conditions permits to use 96-well culture plates; image analyses conducted with an automatic image analyzer allows rapid, accurate and quantitative expression of results. Finally, this system was proved by measuring the apparition of myelin protein to mimic in vitro the physiological process of in vivo myelination. © 2011 Elsevier Inc.


PubMed | Neuron Experts SAS
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Experimental cell research | Year: 2011

Besides in vivo models, co-cultures systems making use of Rat dorsal root ganglion explants/Schwann cells (SC) are widely used to essentially study myelination in vitro. In the case of animal models of demyelinating diseases, it is expected to reproduce a pathological process; conversely the co-cultures are primarily developed to study the myelination process and in the aim to use them to replace animals in experiences of myelin destruction or functional disturbances. We describe (in terms of protein expression kinetic) a new in vitro model of sensory neurons/SC co-cultures presenting the following advantages: both sensory neurons and SC originate from the same individual; sensory neurons and SC being dissociated, they can be co-cultured in monolayer, allowing an easier microscope observation; the co-culture can be maintained in a serum-free medium for at less three months, allowing kinetic studies of myelin formation both at a molecular and cellular level. Optimizing culture conditions permits to use 96-well culture plates; image analyses conducted with an automatic image analyzer allows rapid, accurate and quantitative expression of results. Finally, this system was proved by measuring the apparition of myelin protein to mimic in vitro the physiological process of in vivo myelination.

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