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Militello in Val di Catania, Italy

Perciavalle V.,University of Catania | Coco M.,University of Catania | Alagona G.,Neurological Operative Unit | MacI T.,University of Catania
Somatosensory and Motor Research | Year: 2010

Gender differences in cortical excitability have been detected by using transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS). The present study was carried out to compare the effects of high blood lactate levels, induced by performing a maximal exhausting exercise, on the excitability of the primary motor cortex in young male and female athletes. The study was carried out on 21 young males and 20 females from the Middle Distance Track Team of our university. Before the exercise, at the end, as well as 5 and 10 min after the conclusion, venous blood lactate and glucose were measured and excitability of the motor cortex was evaluated by using TMS. We observed a similar enhancement of excitability of primary motor cortex, concomitantly with an increase of blood lactate, in both young male and female athletes. However, the improvement was significantly higher (p < 0.05) in women (37.4% ± 3.97) than in men (42.0% ± 6.43), suggesting a greater sensitiveness of female cerebral cortex to blood lactate. © 2010 Informa UK Ltd All rights reserved: reproduction in whole or part not permitted. Source


Coco M.,University of Catania | Alagona G.,Neurological Operative Unit | Perciavalle V.,University of Catania | Cicirata V.,University of Catania
Somatosensory and Motor Research | Year: 2011

The aim of the present study was to examine the association of high blood lactate levels, induced with a maximal cycling or with an intravenous infusion, with spinal cord excitability. The study was carried out on 17 male athletes; all the subjects performed a maximal cycling test on a mechanically braked cycloergometer, while 6 of them were submitted to the intravenous infusion of a lactate solution (3mg/kg in 1min). Before the exercise or the injection, also at the end as well as 5 and 10min after the conclusion, venous blood lactate was measured and excitability of the spinal-motoneurons was evaluated by using the H reflex technique. In both experimental conditions, it has been observed that an exhaustive exercise is associated with a strong increase of blood lactate (but not of blood glucose) and with a significant reduction of spinal excitability. Since a similar augment of blood lactate induced by an intravenous infusion, in subjects not performing any exercise, is not associated with significant changes of spinal excitability, it can be concluded that the increase of blood lactate levels during a maximal exercise is not per se capable of modifying the excitability of spinal-motoneurons. © 2011 Informa UK Ltd All rights reserved: reproduction in whole or part not permitted. © 2011 Informa Healthcare Ltd. Source


Coco M.,University of Catania | Alagona G.,Neurological Operative Unit | Perciavalle V.,University of Catania | Rapisarda G.,Neurological Operative Unit | Costanzo E.,Neurological Operative Unit
Somatosensory and Motor Research | Year: 2013

The influence of blood lactate on brainstem excitability was tested by using the blink reflex (BR) recovery cycle on 18 sprinters. Blood lactate was measured before maximal cycling, at the end, as well as 5 and 10 min after the exhaustion. Blood lactate was associated with a decrement of R2 whereas only small changes were observed after an intravenous infusion of lactate. It seems, therefore, that lactate influences BR mainly by acting at the cortical level. © 2013 Informa Healthcare Ltd. Source


Coco M.,University of Catania | Alagona G.,Neurological Operative Unit | De Maria G.,Neurological Operative Unit | Rapisarda G.,Neurological Operative Unit | And 2 more authors.
Neurological Sciences | Year: 2015

We studied, in healthy adult subjects, the association of high blood lactate levels, induced with an exhaustive exercise (12 subjects) or an intravenous infusion (four subjects) of a lactate solution (3 mg/kg in 1 min), with amplitude and latency of visual-evoked potentials. Amplitude of N75, P100, and N145 components did not show significant changes, whereas latency of P100 was reduced at exercise’s end and that of N145 increased 10 min after the conclusion. Therefore, an increase of blood lactate induced by an exhaustive exercise or an intravenous infusion appears to induce an improvement in the conduction time between eye and striate cortex, while it seems to evoke a worsening of intracortical communication between striate and extrastriate areas. © 2014, Springer-Verlag Italia. Source


Perciavalle V.,University of Catania | Alagona G.,Neurological Operative Unit | De Maria G.,Neurological Operative Unit | Rapisarda G.,Neurological Operative Unit | And 2 more authors.
Neurological Sciences | Year: 2015

We compared, in 20 subjects, the effects of high blood lactate levels on amplitude and latency of P1, N1, P2 and N2 components of lower limb somatosensory evoked potential (SEP), an useful, noninvasive tool for assessing the transmission of the afferent volley from periphery up to the cortex. SEPs were recorded from CPz located over the somatosensory vertex and referenced to FPz with a clavicle ground. Measurements were carried out before, at the end as well as 10 and 20 min after the conclusion of a maximal exercise carried out on a mechanically braked cycloergometer. After the exercise, P2–N2 amplitudes as well as latency of P1 and N1 components showed small but significant reductions. On the contrary, latency of N2 component exhibited a significant increase after the exercise’s conclusion. These results suggest that blood lactate appears to have a protective effect against fatigue, at least at level of primary somatosensory cortex, although at the expense of efficiency of adjacent areas. © 2015, Springer-Verlag Italia. Source

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