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Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-FP | Phase: HEALTH-2007-3.3-3 | Award Amount: 4.01M | Year: 2009

AMPHORA is a Europe wide project involving researches and research institutions from 14 European countries, and counterparts and organizations from all 27 Member States, that will provide new scientific evidence for the best public health measures to reduce the harm done by alcohol through addressing social and cultural determinants, marketing and advertising, taxes and pricing, availability and access, early diagnosis and treatment of disease, interventions in drinking environments, and safer untaxed alcohol products. Cost effectiveness analyses will be undertaken in multiple settings, geographical regions, and for different gender and age groups to guide integrated policy making to reduce the harm done by alcohol. Using time series analysis, longitudinal intervention research, policy mapping, cost effectiveness analyses, and other policy relevant research methodologies, recent and current alcohol policy changes will be evaluated throughout European Member States. Current alcohol policy related infrastructures will be documented and their impact on effective policy development and implementation analyzed. The interaction between social and cultural determinants of alcohol policy and policy and preventive measures will be studied to determine the extent to which the implementation and impact of effective alcohol policies is culturally determined. Methodologies will be developed to allow tools for benchmarking and comparative analysis at the European level, advancing the state of the art in alcohol policy research and enhancing cooperation between researchers in Europe and other geographic regions to promote integration and excellence of European research in alcohol policy. AMPHORA will provide the evidence base to inform policy and decision makers at European, national and local levels to implement effective interventions to reduce the harm done by alcohol throughout a wide range of policies implemented in different sectors and settings.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-FP | Phase: HEALTH-2007-3.3-4 | Award Amount: 3.84M | Year: 2008

Suicide is a serious public health problem in the EU calling for effective interventions. The aim of this project is to provide EU member states with an evidence based prevention concept, concrete materials and instruments for running and evaluating these interventions and recommendations for the proper implementation of the intervention. These aims will be achieved by the following objectives: > Analysis of differences in suicide rates among European countries and harmonisation of procedures for definition, assessment and evaluation of suicidality > Development of a state of the art intervention concept for the prevention of suicidality that considers current evidence-based best practices and international experiences with multilevel interventions, such as that of the European Alliance Against Depression > Implementation of comparable multilevel community based prevention interventions in four European model regions > Evaluation of the interventions in a pre-post, controlled and cross-nationally comparable design concerning effectiveness with respect to both suicides and non-fatal suicidal acts, efficiency (including health economic evaluations), involved processes and finally the interplay between the single intervention measures > Distribution of an optimised suicide preventive intervention concept, corresponding materials and instruments, and recommendations for implementation to policy makers and stakeholders


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-IP | Phase: SSH-2010-3.2-1 | Award Amount: 10.21M | Year: 2011

ALICE RAP is a Europe wide project of 43 partner research institutions involving 107 researchers from 25 European countries providing 1000 months of a plurality of scientific endeavour to analyse the place and challenges of addictions and lifestyles to the cohesion, organization and functioning of contemporary European society. Through integrated multidisciplinary research, a wide range of factors will be studied through a foresight approach to inform a redesign of effective addictions governance. Ownership will be described by an historical study of addiction through the ages, an analysis of public and private stakeholder views, and through image analyses, of professional and citizenship views. A study of how addictions are classified and defined will be followed by estimates of their health, social and economic impact. Determinants of addiction will be investigated through a coordinated and cohesive social, economic and biological analysis of initiation, transition into problem use and transition into and out of dependence. The business of addiction will be analyzed through studies of revenues, profits and participants in legal and illegal trade, the impact of suppliers on addictive substance use and behaviours, and analyses of webs of influence on policy responses. Addictions governance will be studied by describing the views and forces that determine the ways societies steer themselves and by stock taking of present governance practices to old and emerging addictions. Youth as customers will be analyzed through considering the impacts of new technologies on promoting and mitigating use, by studying the interrelations of culture and biology, and by determining features that promote resilience and nudge young people to reduce problematic use. The programme itself will be professionally managed from a partnership perspective to promote a coordinated and integrated approach to the high volume of research and its policy implications.


Ten Have M.,Netherlands Institute of Mental Health and Addiction | De Graaf R.,Netherlands Institute of Mental Health and Addiction | Van Weeghel J.,University of Tilburg | Van Dorsselaer S.,Netherlands Institute of Mental Health and Addiction
Psychological Medicine | Year: 2014

Background Few studies have been published on the association between mental disorders and violence based on general population studies. Here we focus on different types of violence, adjusting for violent victimization and taking account of the limitations of previous population studies. Method Data were used from the first two waves of the Netherlands Mental Health Survey and Incidence Study-2 (NEMESIS-2), a nationally representative face-to-face survey of the general population aged 18-64 years (n = 6646). Violence was differentiated into physical and psychological violence against intimate partner(s), children or any person(s) in general. DSM-IV diagnoses were assessed with the Composite International Diagnostic Interview Version 3.0 (CIDI 3.0). Results Psychological violence occurs considerably more frequently than physical violence, but both showed almost identical associations with mental disorders. After adjustment for sociodemographic characteristics, most of the main categories of common mental disorders were associated with violence. The strongest associations were found for externalizing disorders (substance use, impulse-control, antisocial personality disorder). After additional adjustment for violent victimization, negative life events and social support, most diagnostic correlates lost their significance whereas substance use (in particular alcohol) disorders were still associated with most types of violence. Conclusions The increased risk of violent offending among people with common mental disorders, other than substance use disorders, can be attributed to factors other than their mental illness. © Cambridge University Press 2013.


De Graaf R.O.N.,Netherlands Institute of Mental Health and Addiction | Have M.T.,Netherlands Institute of Mental Health and Addiction | Van Dorsselaer S.,Netherlands Institute of Mental Health and Addiction
International Journal of Methods in Psychiatric Research | Year: 2010

The psychiatric epidemiological population study NEMESIS-2 (Netherlands Mental Health Survey and Incidence Study-2) replicates and expands the first Netherlands Mental Health Survey and Incidence Study (NEMESIS-1) conducted from 1996 to 1999. The main objectives of the new study are to provide up-to-date figures on the prevalence, incidence, course and consequences of mental disorders, and to study trends in mental disorders and service use, with the use of a new sample. New topics not included in NEMESIS-1 were added, e.g. impulse-control disorders, and genetic correlates of mental disorders through gathering DNA from saliva samples. This paper gives an overview of the design of NEMESIS-2, especially of its recently completed first wave. NEMESIS-2 is a prospective study among Dutch-speaking subjects aged 18-64 years from the general Dutch population. Its baseline wave included 6646 subjects. Three waves are planned with three year-intervals between the waves. A multistage, stratified random sampling procedure was applied. The baseline wave of NEMESIS-2 was performed between November 2007 and July 2009. Face-to-face interviews were administered with the Composite International Diagnostic Interview (CIDI) 3.0. The response rate was 65.1%, and 76.4% of the respondents donated saliva. The sample was reasonably nationally representative, but younger subjects were somewhat underrepresented. In conclusion, we were able to build a comprehensive dataset of good quality, permitting several topics to be studied in the future. Copyright © 2010 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.


Ten Have M.,Netherlands Institute of Mental Health and Addiction | Nuyen J.,Netherlands Institute of Mental Health and Addiction | Beekman A.,VU University Amsterdam | De Graaf R.,Netherlands Institute of Mental Health and Addiction
Psychological Medicine | Year: 2013

Background Detailed population-based survey information on the relationship between the severity of common mental disorders (CMDs) and treatment for mental health problems is heavily based on North American research. The aim of this study was to replicate and expand existing knowledge by studying CMD severity and its association with treatment contact and treatment intensity in The Netherlands. Method Data were obtained from the Netherlands Mental Health Survey and Incidence Study-2 (NEMESIS-2), a nationally representative face-to-face survey of the general population aged 18-64 years (n = 6646, response rate = 65.1%). DSM-IV diagnoses and disorder severity were assessed with the Composite International Diagnostic Interview Version 3.0 (CIDI 3.0). Treatment contact refers to at least one contact for mental health problems made in the general medical care (GMC) or mental health care (MHC) sector. Four levels of treatment intensity were assessed, based on type and duration of therapy received. Results Although CMD severity was related to treatment contact, only 39.0% of severe cases received MHC. At the same time, 40.3% of MHC users did not have a 12-month disorder. Increasing levels of treatment intensity ranged from 51.6% to 13.0% in GMC and from 81.4% to 51.1% in MHC. CMD severity was related to treatment intensity in MHC but not in GMC. Sociodemographic characteristics were not significantly related to having experienced the highest level of treatment intensity in MHC. Conclusions Mental health treatment in the GMC sector should be improved, especially when policy is aimed at increasing the role of primary care in the management of mental health problems. Copyright © Cambridge University Press 2013Â.


De Graaf R.,Netherlands Institute of Mental Health and Addiction | Ten Have M.,Netherlands Institute of Mental Health and Addiction | Van Gool C.,National Institute for Public Health and Environment | Van Dorsselaer S.,Netherlands Institute of Mental Health and Addiction
Social Psychiatry and Psychiatric Epidemiology | Year: 2012

Objective To present prevalences of lifetime and 12- month DSM-IV mood, anxiety, substance use and impulse- control disorders from the second Netherlands Mental Health Survey and Incidence Study (NEMESIS-2), and to compare the 12-month prevalence of mood, anxiety and substance use disorders with estimates from the first study (NEMESIS-1). Method Between November 2007 and July 2009, a nationally representative face-to-face survey was conducted using the Composite International Diagnostic Interview 3.0 among 6,646 subjects aged 18-64. Trends in 12-month prevalence of mental disorders were examined with these data and NEMESIS-1 data from 1996 (n = 7,076). Results Lifetime prevalence estimates in NEMESIS-2 were 20.2% for mood, 19.6% for anxiety, 19.1% for substance use disorder and 9.2% for impulse-control disorder. For 12-month disorders, these figures were 6.1, 10.1, 5.6 and 2.1%, respectively. Between 1996 and 2007-2009, the 12-month prevalence of anxiety and substance use disorder did not change. The prevalence of mood disorder decreased slightly but lost significance after controlling for differences in sociodemographic variables between the two studies. Conclusion This study shows that in the Netherlands mental disorders are prevalent. In about a decade, no clear change in mental health status was found. © Springer-Verlag 2010.


Brunt T.M.,Netherlands Institute of Mental Health and Addiction | Niesink R.J.,Netherlands Institute of Mental Health and Addiction
Drug Testing and Analysis | Year: 2011

The Ministry of Health in the Netherlands has made illicit drug testing for drug users possible since the 1990s, in order to prevent serious health hazards associated with unexpected dangerous substances. This system of illicit drug testing is called the Drug Information and Monitoring System (DIMS). In nearly two decades, more than 100 000 drug samples have been handed in at DIMS testing facilities. This review describes the DIMS methodology and overviews results of the three main psychostimulant drug markets that have been monitored, i.e. ecstasy, amphetamine (speed), and cocaine. Additionally, monitoring results of hallucinogens are also described for the first time. For comparison, alternative international monitoring systems are described briefly alongside some of their results. Finally, drug monitoring is discussed from the perspectives of policy, prevention, and the drug users themselves. © 2011 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.


Vanwesenbeeck I.,University Utrecht | Have M.,Netherlands Institute of Mental Health and Addiction | De Graaf R.,Netherlands Institute of Mental Health and Addiction
British Journal of Psychiatry | Year: 2014

Background: Little is known about the associations between common mental disorders and sexual dissatisfaction in the general population. Aims: To assess the associations between the presence of 12-month and remitted (lifetime minus 12-month) mood, anxiety and substance use disorders and sexual dissatisfaction in the general population of The Netherlands. Method: A total of 6646 participants, aged 18-64, took part in a face-to-face survey using the Composite International Diagnostic Interview 3.0. Childhood trauma, somatic disorders and sexual dissatisfaction were also assessed in an additional questionnaire. Associations were assessed with multivariate regression analyses. Results: In total, 29% reported some sexual dissatisfaction. Controlling for demography, somatic disorders and childhood trauma, significant associations with 12-month mood disorder (B = 0.31), substance use disorder (B = 0.23) and anxiety disorder (B = 0.16) were found. Specifically, relatively strong associations were found for alcohol dependence (B = 0.54), bipolar disorder (B = 0.45) and drug dependence (B = 0.44). The association between remitted disorders and sexual dissatisfaction showed significance for the category substance use disorder. Conclusions: People with mood, anxiety and substance use disorders show elevated scores on sexual dissatisfaction, even when relevant confounders are controlled for. Sexual satisfaction appears to be reduced most by alcohol and drug dependence and bipolar disorder. Once remitted, substance use disorder shows a persisting association with present sexual dissatisfaction.


Ten Have M.,Netherlands Institute of Mental Health and Addiction | Van Dorsselaer S.,Netherlands Institute of Mental Health and Addiction | De Graaf R.,Netherlands Institute of Mental Health and Addiction
Journal of Affective Disorders | Year: 2013

Background: To report lifetime prevalences of suicidal ideation, plans and attempts, as well as risk factors for first onset suicidal behaviours and for the transition from ideation to first onset plan or attempt. Methods: Data were used from the Netherlands Mental Health Survey and Incidence Study-2 (NEMESIS-2), a nationally representative survey among the general population aged 18-64 years (N=6646; response rate=65.1%). Face-to-face interviews were administered between November 2007 and July 2009. Suicidal behaviours and DSM-IV mental disorders were assessed using the Composite International Diagnostic Interview 3.0. Results: The lifetime prevalence of suicidal ideation, plan and attempt was 8.3%, 3.0% and 2.2%, respectively. Among ideators, the probability of ever making an attempt was 26.8%. 76.5% of transitions from ideation to attempt occurred within the first year after ideation onset. Risk factors for suicidal behaviours included being female, younger, less educated, having had childhood trauma and a prior mental disorder. The strongest risk factors for the transition from ideation to first onset attempt were characteristics of prior suicidal behaviours, such as an early age of ideation onset and prior plans. Limitations: Data were based on retrospective self-reports of mental disorders and suicidal behaviours. Conclusions: It is important that health professionals verify suicide plans of their patients with suicidal ideas. They should also discuss the way their patients deal with problems and the kind of help they need, because a substantial proportion of (first) attempts was not intended to kill oneself. Preventive measures are best offered within the first year after ideation onset. © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

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