Netherlands Forensic Institute

The Hague, Netherlands

Netherlands Forensic Institute

The Hague, Netherlands
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Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: FP7 | Program: MC-ITN | Phase: FP7-PEOPLE-ITN-2008 | Award Amount: 3.22M | Year: 2010

With various forms of biometric technologies becoming available, there is a growing need for scientists who are able to assess the merits of these technologies when applied to forensics. The Marie Curie ITN `Bayesian Biometrics for Forensics, or BBfor2, will provide a training infrastructure that will educate Early Stage Researchers in the core biometric technologies of speaker, face and fingerprint recognition, as well as the forensic aspects of these technologies. According to modern interpretation of evidence in court, biometric evidence must be presented as likelihood ratios. The calibration of likelihood ratios of individual behavioural and physical biometrics and of combinations of biometric modalities, including measures of the quality of the traces, is a unifying topic in all research projects in this Network. The training of ESRs will be realized as individual PhD projects at various research labs, including a forensic institute. Apart from training at their host institute and secondments with other network partners, the ESRs will receive training in dedicated Summer Schools on Biometric Signal Processing, Bayesian Techniques in Forensic Applications and Legal Issues in Forensic Applications. The Network combines 8 European Universities and a leading Forensic Institute; it is augmented by a biometric industrial and a research institute, where secondments of the ESRs will take place.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: H2020 | Program: MSCA-ITN-EJD | Phase: MSCA-ITN-2016 | Award Amount: 3.76M | Year: 2017

Though security is a field of study capable of diverse applications in daily life, security science is a young discipline requiring larger inter-disciplinary effort. ESSENTIAL seeks to develop security science by addressing two of its main problems: the ad-hoc approach to security research and the growing complexity of the security environment. To do so, ESSENTIAL has set itself two main goals: a) to train inter-disciplinary security experts and professionals, to tackle security threats in a systematic manner and b) to increase societal resilience and security by addressing in an interdisciplinary manner 15 research topics, each associated with long-standing problems in the field of security science ranging from modeling security perception and democratizing intelligence to improving security and privacy in data ecosystems. ESSENTIAL will be the first programme of its kind that aims to jointly educate the next generation of interdisciplinary experts in security science, by uniquely exposing the 15 ESRs to: (1) theoretical knowledge and practical expertise in such areas as: (a) the policing and regulation of information-security technology, and (b) the implementation of policies and legal standards within computing and communication systems; (2) real-world environments in law enforcement, intelligence and industry; (3) strong academic guidance offered by highly qualified supervisors and mentors; (4) high tech research infrastructures; and (5) a diversity of interdisciplinary research events, such as workshops, conferences, summer/winter schools. The ESSENTIAL consortium is built upon long-lasting cooperation relations among leading organizations coming from academia, international and national stakeholders and the private sector, many of whom have over 25 years of experience in contributing directly to national, European and UN technology-related policy making.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-FP | Phase: SEC-2013.1.5-1 | Award Amount: 7.13M | Year: 2014

Forensic investigation is a key component in the fight against crime and the protection of EU societies. At present it is hampered by a lack of protocols and training in carrying out forensic analysis on CBRN-contaminated materials. The aim of GIFT-CBRN is to develop a forensic toolbox for investigating CBRN incidents. This toolbox would provide (1) procedures, sampling methods and detection of CBRN agents at the crime scene, (2) traditional forensic laboratory methods for contaminated evidence and (3) laboratory methods for profiling the CBRN agents released at the incident. The procedures and methods are will be set up and validated according to ISO17025 and the system validation will be performed by a final exercise. Procedures for chain of custody, QC to ensure the integrity of the evidence and investigations done on the evidence from crime scene to court will be developed. An education and training curriculum related to the developed procedures, best practices and methods will be designed and progressed to implementation. Underpinning the above aims, research will be carried out to develop novel methodologies to enable traditional forensic science (DNA, fingerprint and electronic devices) to be carried out on CBRN contaminated exhibits and analytical procedures to be carried out that not only provide information about the CBRN agent itself but also through CBRN profiling provide in-depth information which can give valuable forensic information, for example points of origin. The project team includes forensic research laboratories, potential users of the expected developments, including public and private users, and SMEs who will be able to bring the new technologies developed within the project to market.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: H2020 | Program: RIA | Phase: FCT-01-2015 | Award Amount: 11.99M | Year: 2016

ASGARD has a singular goal, contribute to Law Enforcement Agencies Technological Autonomy and effective use of technology. Technologies will be transferred to end users under an open source scheme focusing on Forensics, Intelligence and Foresight (Intelligence led prevention and anticipation). ASGARD will drive progress in the processing of seized data, availability of massive amounts of data and big data solutions in an ever more connected world. New areas of research will also be addressed. The consortium is configured with LEA end users and practitioners pulling from the Research and Development community who will push transfer of knowledge and innovation. A Community of LEA users is the end point of ASGARD with the technology as a focal point for cooperation (a restricted open source community). In addition to traditional Use Cases and trials, in keeping with open source concepts and continuous integration approaches, ASGARD will use Hackathons to demonstrate its results. Vendor lock-in is addressed whilst also recognising their role and existing investment by LEAs. The project will follow a cyclical approach for early results. Data Set, Data Analytics (multimodal/ multimedia), Data Mining and Visual Analytics are included in the work plan. Technologies will be built under the maxim of It works over Its the best. Rapid adoption/flexible deployment strategies are included. The project includes a licensing and IPR approach coherent with LEA realities and Ethical needs. ASGARD includes a comprehensive approach to Privacy, Ethics, Societal Impact respecting fundamental rights. ASGARD leverages existing trust relationship between LEAs and the research and development industry, and experiential knowledge in FCT research. ASGARD will allow its community of users leverage the benefits of agile methodologies, technology trends and open source approaches that are currently exploited by the general ICT sector and Organised Crime and Terrorist organisations.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: FP7 | Program: CSA-CA | Phase: SEC-2012.4.4-1 | Award Amount: 1.42M | Year: 2013

Background: In case of major intentional, accidental or natural CBRN incident, fast in field identification of agents is crucial for optimal risk assessment, risk management, and counter measures. A determining factor is to bring a rapidly CRBN deployable diagnostic and forensic capacity as close as possible to the crisis area. Objective: To harmonize the definition of a CBRN mobile laboratory and to identify the needs and solutions for deployment in- and outside the EU. Methods: An evidence-based multidimensional matrix (type of threats, magnitude, location, societal impact) will be used to define the scenarios and missions justifying the use of CBRN deployable capacities. A state of the art of existing capacities within the EU and gap analysis will be carried out to identify actions for improvements and to assess the best possible organizational and operational architectures enabling sustainability at optimal costs for the society. The role of national or international regulatory authorities and agencies will be reviewed to assess which should be stakeholders of CBRN mobile capacities and how to coordinate the activities these EU mechanism of CBRN crisis management. A straightforward interface with existing EU capabilities and expertise will be delineated. A strong emphasis will also be put on other synergistic EU and non-EU projects. Practicalities (i.e., structures, equipments and functions including operational procedures, communication, logistics, forensics and related legal issues) will be assessed with technological suppliers and end-users. Building partnerships and cooperation with interested stakeholders (e.g., EU key actors, nations within and outside the EU in strong demand for this type of capacity) will be a specific task dedicated to the dissemination of the MIRACLE project. Impact: A set of deliverables leading to an evidence-based CBRN mobile laboratory architecture based on flexibility, scalability, modularity, and interoperability.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP | Phase: SEC-2010.4.2-2 | Award Amount: 11.69M | Year: 2011

The objective of PRACTICE project is to improve the preparedness and resilience of the EU member states and associated countries to an attack from a terrorist group using non conventional weapons such as CBRN (Chemical, Biological, Radiological and/or Nuclear agents) materials. The existing situation is characterized by a fragmented structure as regards technology, procedures, methods and organization on national level as well as EU-level. The project will be based on the development of a new toolbox focusing on 1) identification, organization and establishment of knowledge of critical elements in the event structure thorough studies of a wide selection of scenarios, real incidents and exercises and 2) analysis and identification of gaps in the current response situation and organization and integration of the allocated response capabilities or functions in a toolbox of equipment, procedures and methods and 3) an allocated system or kit for public information, decision-support, first-responder training and exercises. These response capabilities functions are to a great extent universal in character and independent of national organizational structures. The concept and developed system will therefore provide EU and member states with a flexible and integrated system for coordinated response to CBRN terrorist attack, which is easier to adapt to various national organizations and regulations. Particular attention will be given to integration and understanding of human factors and societal aspects in all the parts of the project. The final concept and integrated response system (toolbox) and subsystems will be tested and validated. A whole system demonstrator will be shown and tested in the final phases of the project.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP | Phase: SEC-2009-1.3-04 | Award Amount: 4.47M | Year: 2010

SALIANT aims to develop a hand-held device for real-time analysis of trace levels of explosives, chemicals and drugs. The key innovation is a positive detection lateral-flow test for small molecules that is highly sensitive and simple to use making it ideally suited to deployment by First Responders at crime scenes and terrorist incidents. Lateral flow immunodiagnostics has long offered the promise of fast, high quality testing for substances of low molecular weight. There have however been very real challenges to bringing the full power of such technology to bear in this area. The problem is simply size. Large analytes can support the simultaneous binding of both capture and detector antibodies, allowing typical excess-reagent sandwich immunoassays to be formatted in which increasing analyte concentration provides an increase of observable signal over a very low zero background. Small molecules are simply not large enough to support such simultaneous binding. Alternative systems in effect measure how much analyte is not present. This causes major problems in terms of precision, sensitivity and read-out where, classically, increasing concentration of analyte reduces the signal produced, making point-of-need devices often difficult to read. What is required is a robust system in which there is no observable signal in the absence of analyte, and even low level samples give an obvious observable signal over this zero background. SALIANT offers a system based on a small bindable moiety that is first conjugated close to the binding site of a primary antibody against the analyte such that when analyte binds the antibody, the moiety can still be bound by a labelled secondary antibody. A large reagent-analogue of the analyte is also introduced, binding analyte-unbound primary antibody, and thereby blocking binding of the secondary antibody to the moiety. Thus the more analyte present, the more binding of secondary antibody occurs and the more signal is produced.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP | Phase: SEC-2009-1.3-04 | Award Amount: 4.69M | Year: 2010

MiDAS will deliver a self-contained, portable instrument to produce DNA database compatible results from crime samples in 2 hours. Automated processes for DNA analysis of large numbers of samples are now used in many of the EU member states; however the most efficient of these high throughput systems can take 3-5 days to produce DNA database-compliant profiles. In high profile crime and terrorism cases it is crucial to access DNA results promptly to provide intelligence to investigators. Currently a small number of samples can be processed in less than 24 h but the method is labour intensive and expensive. MiDAS proposes a real-time, simple-to-operate and cost effective alternative. MiDAS will build on the current expertise of the consortium to deliver a robust, reliable instrument adaptable to the needs of multiple EU agencies. The design will allow processing of small numbers of samples at the scene of a crime, in an office environment or in the laboratory. Samples will be directly introduced to the device; no further manual involvement will be required. DNA will be extracted using magnetic bead technology and transferred to reaction chambers for quantification and amplification which will be controlled to normalise the DNA profile. The profile will be visualised following analysis through on-cartridge DNA separation and laser induced fluorescencebased detection. Automated data analysis using expert systems will facilitate the timely delivery of a profile. The requirements for implementation of the instrument into the forensic process will be determined, including an evaluation of relevant legislative and data protection requirements. Successful forensic validation of the instrument and subsequent validation of the full forensic process designed around the instrument will allow implementation of MiDAS to the forensic community within the partner EU member states, enabling the delivery of early DNA intelligence to law enforcement and security agencies.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: FP7 | Program: NoE | Phase: SEC-2011.7.4-1 | Award Amount: 8.18M | Year: 2012

The EUROFORGEN-NoE proposal aims to develop a network of excellence for the creation of a European Virtual Centre of Forensic Genetic Research. Forensic genetics is a highly innovative field of applied science with a strong impact on the security of citizens. However, the genetic methods to identify offenders as well as the creation of national DNA databases have caused concerns to the possible violation of privacy rights. Furthermore, studies to assess the societal dimension of security following the implementation of even more intrusive methods such as the genetic prediction of externally visible characteristics are highly relevant for their public acceptance. The network includes some of the leading groups in European forensic genetic research. It aims to create a closer integration of existing collaborations, as well as establishing new interactions in the field of security, as all key players are addressed: scientists, stakeholders, end-users, educational centres and scientific societies. Only if a long-term collaborative network can be established it will become possible to connect all scientific groups active in the field of forensic genetics, and to initiate a sustained effort covering all aspects of research. These efforts have to be combined with identifying and selecting the most innovative ideas to meet the challenges of analyzing biological crime scene samples compromised by degradation or indentified as mixtures of traces from multiple human sources. The proposal integrates five working packages. WP 1 is devoted to management and coordination. WP 2 will lead the activities aimed at the creation of the virtual centre of research. WP 3 will carry out exemplar projects as models of collaboration and integration of cutting edge research, later complemented by a competitive call for new research projects. The societal dimension of security as well as the ethical and legal aspects wil be addressed in WP 4, whereas WP 5 is devoted to education and training.

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