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Guenther H.,Kraft Foods Inc. | Hoenicke K.,Eurofins | Biesterveld S.,Sara Lee DE NV | Gerhard-Rieben E.,Nestec Ltd | Lantz I.,Tchibo GmbH
Food Additives and Contaminants - Part A Chemistry, Analysis, Control, Exposure and Risk Assessment | Year: 2010

The occurrence of furan in some food products has already been known for a few decades, and it has been reconfirmed in more recent investigations that furan is present in a variety of foodstuffs. This list of products includes roasted coffee, which has been shown to generate furan as a result of the heat treatment at roasting which is applied to achieve the desired aroma and flavour profile of a roasted coffee. The objective of this study is to provide data to allow a better understanding of the available data of furan in coffee, the kinetics of furan generated during roasting, and to estimate the reduction of furan levels afterwards due to subsequent processing steps and consumer handling. Finally, the study is meant as a contribution to establish exposure data on the basis of scientific data at the stage of coffee consumption. This paper shows that the formation of furan during roasting is dependent on roasting conditions and is, therefore, directly linked to achieving targeted flavour profiles. Furthermore, it is demonstrated that modifications in process conditions potentially to reduce furan levels may have the opposite effect on other undesired reaction products of the roasting chemistry such as, for example, acrylamide. Due to the high volatility of furan, any subsequent processing step or consumer handling has an impact on the level of furan. As a guidance from this study and in consideration of the identified losses of each process and handling step on the basis of the trial conditions, it is estimated that only approximately 10% of the initially generated furan during roasting gets into the cup of coffee for consumption. © 2010 Taylor & Francis.


Reis P.,AC Immune SA | Watzke H.,Nestec Ltd | Leser M.,Nestlé | Holmberg K.,Chalmers University of Technology | Miller R.,Max Planck Institute of Colloids and Interfaces
Biophysical Chemistry | Year: 2010

Obesity is a serious public health concern with an increasing prevalence worldwide. The diet contributes strongly to this problem and high-fat food leads to unhealthy conditions. Fat digestion is an energy intensive process as it requires hydrolysis to allow the body to profit from this nutrient. This additional energy expenditure is also present in a highly redundant hormonal regulation system for fat storage which is converted in not a readily accessible form (therefore, an upstream is required in order to tackle fat-related diseases). Due to the low water solubility of oils and fats, the lipase catalyzed reactions take place at a specific locus, the oil-water interface. Despite considerable efforts in the past the effects of the interfacial composition on lipase activity have been only qualitatively understood until recently. It has recently been undertaken a detailed study of the interfacial behavior of lipases, their substrates and products which have contributed to shed light into the mechanism of lipolysis [1-4]. In addition, there are strong evidences that lipase activity is a function of interfacial composition and changes concurrently with lipolytic conversion [1]. In these cases lipase "inhibition" should be attributed to substrate depletion and not to lipase desorption or denaturation as previously hypothesized [5]. This self-limiting effect through the feedback of interfacial composition to the reaction conditions of the enzyme opens a new avenue to control lipase catalysis through the interface. A set of experiments are proposed which can be performed to further characterize and gain a deeper insight into interfacial enzymology. © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.


Henry H.,University of Lausanne | Marmy Conus N.,Nestec Ltd | Steenhout P.,Nestec Ltd | Beguin A.,University of Lausanne | Boulat O.,University of Lausanne
Biomedical Chromatography | Year: 2012

d-Lactic acid in urine originates mainly from bacterial production in the intestinal tract. Increased d-lactate excretion as observed in patients affected by short bowel syndrome or necrotizing enterocolitis reflects d-lactic overproduction. Therefore, there is a need for a reliable and sensitive method able to detect d-lactic acid even at subclinical elevation levels. A new and highly sensitive method for the simultaneous determination of l- and d-lactic acid by a two-step procedure has been developed. This method is based on the concentration of lactic acid enantiomers from urine by supported liquid extraction followed by high-performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. The separation was achieved by the use of an Astec Chirobiotic™ R chiral column under isocratic conditions. The calibration curves were linear over the ranges of 2-400 and 0.5-100μmol/L respectively for l- and d-lactic acid. The limit of detection of d-lactic acid was 0.125μmol/L and its limit of quantification was 0.5μmol/L. The overall accuracy and precision were well within 10% of the nominal values. The developed method is suitable for production of reference values in children and could be applied for accurate routine analysis. © 2011 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.


Nesbitt K.,Nestec Inc.
Pollution Engineering | Year: 2012

Several general ways to enhance the purchasing process, ensuring the most effective system at the best commercial terms, are discussed. While establishing a proper decision-making system, system's overall flexibility should be taken into account, especially for projects in which there may be substantial future process changes. A variety of tools can be used, such as Dun and Bradstreet Reports, references for vendors to the supplier, and the supplier's ability to obtain a performance bond. The selection of suppliers is typically determined through a preliminary budget proposal process. Any copies of non-confidential facility or utility layouts, drawings or photos that are relevant to the installation should be provided to the supplier as early as feasible. Items provided/not provided by supplier or customer should be reviewed, which should be followed by the purchase of the system.


Patent
Nestec Ltd. | Date: 2011-06-01

An anti-obesity agent containing, as an active ingredient, a microorganism which belongs to the species Lactobacillus reuteri and is capable of producing lipases having the amino acid sequences respectively depicted in SEQ ID NO: 1, 3 or 5 or amino acid sequences having deletion, substitution or addition of one or more amino acids in the amino acid sequences respectively depicted in SEQ ID NO: 1, 3 or 5. The anti-obesity agent enables a patient to take a normal meal yet preventing the absorption of a fat into the body which is the primary cause of obesity.


Patent
Nestec Ltd. | Date: 2011-06-06

An anti-obesity agent containing, as an active ingredient, a microorganism which belongs to the species Lactobacillus reuteri and is capable of producing lipases having the amino acid sequences respectively depicted in SEQ ID NO: 1, 3 or 5 or amino acid sequences having deletion, substitution or addition of one or more amino acids in the amino acid sequences respectively depicted in SEQ ID NO: 1, 3 or 5. The anti-obesity agent enables a patient to take a normal meal yet preventing the absorption of a fat into the body which is the primary cause of obesity.


Patent
Nes&Tec Co. | Date: 2014-02-06

Disclosed is an easy landing drone. The drone includes: a propeller changing direction; a propeller tower supporting the propeller; a body connected to the propeller tower; a main wing arranged left-right symmetrically with respect to a horizontal axis of the body and having a pair of holes around a center of gravity of the body; a pair of auxiliary wings disposed in the pair of holes, respectively; and an actuator connected to a base shaft fixed to the main wing through the pair of auxiliary wings and controlling angles of the pair of auxiliary wings.


Patent
Nestec Ltd. | Date: 2013-06-19

The invention relates to an anti-obesity agent and an anti-obesity food comprising Lactobacillus rhamnosus ATCC 53103.


Patent
NES&TEC Co. | Date: 2010-11-24

The present invention relates to a device for identifying the type of tire by measuring the size and shape of the tire with a 3D scanner. A tire identification device according to the present invention is connected with a 3D scanner and a user terminal, and includes a tire standard database storing 3D scan data of a plurality of tires and an identification module searching 3D scan data having a pattern that is the same as a pattern of 3D scan data transmitted from the 3D scanner in the tire standard database, and providing the type of tire corresponding to the searched 3D scan data. 3D scan data is one of a data cloud and line profile data represented by a bending shape of a side end of a tire. The tier identification device according to the present invention can promptly identify the type of tire without stopping a conveyer in a tire manufacturing process, and the identification is not interrupted by air vent so that the identification rate can be improved.


A gender specific food for puppiers is disclosed where the food includes at least about 0.25 % methionine by weight and at least about 0.45 % total sulfur amino acids. The food further includes a total dietary lipid level based on gender, and for maximizing body weight and length gains, lipid levels and the amounts of methionine are adjusted based upon the gender of the puppy.

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