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Nerites Corporation

www.NERITES.COM
MADISON, WI, United States
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Nistico L.,Allegheny Singer Research Institute | Kreft R.,Allegheny Singer Research Institute | Gieseke A.,Max Planck Institute for Marine Microbiology | Coticchia J.M.,Wayne State University | And 19 more authors.
Journal of Clinical Microbiology | Year: 2011

Biofilms of pathogenic bacteria are present on the middle ear mucosa of children with chronic otitis media (COM) and may contribute to the persistence of pathogens and the recalcitrance of COM to antibiotic treatment. Controlled studies indicate that adenoidectomy is effective in the treatment of COM, suggesting that the adenoids may act as a reservoir for COM pathogens. To investigate the bacterial community in the adenoid, samples were obtained from 35 children undergoing adenoidectomy for chronic OM or obstructive sleep apnea. We used a novel, culture-independent molecular diagnostic methodology, followed by confocal microscopy, to investigate the in situ distribution and organization of pathogens in the adenoids to determine whether pathogenic bacteria exhibited criteria characteristic of biofilms. The Ibis T5000 Universal Biosensor System was used to interrogate the extent of the microbial diversity within adenoid biopsy specimens. Using a suite of 16 broad-range bacterial primers, we demonstrated that adenoids from both diagnostic groups were colonized with polymicrobial biofilms. Haemophilus influenzae was present in more adenoids from the COM group (P = 0.005), but there was no significant difference between the two patient groups for Streptococcus pneumoniae or Staphylococcus aureus. Fluorescence in situ hybridization, lectin binding, and the use of antibodies specific for host epithelial cells demonstrated that pathogens were aggregated, surrounded by a carbohydrate matrix, and localized on and within the epithelial cell surface, which is consistent with criteria for bacterial biofilms. Copyright © 2011, American Society for Microbiology.


Lee B.P.,Michigan Technological University | Messersmith P.B.,Nerites Corporation | Messersmith P.B.,Northwestern University | Israelachvili J.N.,University of California at Santa Barbara | Waite J.H.,University of California at Santa Barbara
Annual Review of Materials Research | Year: 2011

Mussels attach to solid surfaces in the sea. Their adhesion must be rapid, strong, and tough, or else they will be dislodged and dashed to pieces by the next incoming wave. Given the dearth of synthetic adhesives for wet polar surfaces, much effort has been directed to characterizing and mimicking essential features of the adhesive chemistry practiced by mussels. Studies of these organisms have uncovered important adaptive strategies that help to circumvent the high dielectric and solvation properties of water that typically frustrate adhesion. In a chemical vein, the adhesive proteins of mussels are heavily decorated with Dopa, a catecholic functionality. Various synthetic polymers have been functionalized with catechols to provide diverse adhesive, sealant, coating, and anchoring properties, particularly for critical biomedical applications. © 2011 by Annual Reviews. All rights reserved.


Brodie M.,Nerites Corporation | Vollenweider L.,Nerites Corporation | Murphy J.L.,Nerites Corporation | Xu F.,Nerites Corporation | And 3 more authors.
Biomedical Materials | Year: 2011

The Achilles tendon is the most frequently ruptured tendon. Both acute and chronic (neglected) tendon ruptures can dramatically affect a patient's quality of life, and require a prolonged period of recovery before return to pre-injury activity levels. This paper describes the use of an adhesive-coated biologic scaffold to augment primary suture repair of transected Achilles tendons. The adhesive portion consisted of a synthetic mimic of mussel adhesive proteins that can adhere to various surfaces in a wet environment, including biologic tissues. When combined with biologic scaffolds such as bovine pericardium or porcine dermal tissues, these adhesive constructs demonstrated lap shear adhesive strengths significantly greater than that of fibrin glue, while reaching up to 60% of the strength of a cyanoacrylate-based adhesive. These adhesive constructs were wrapped around transected cadaveric porcine Achilles tendons repaired with a combination of parallel and three-loop suture patterns. Tensile mechanical testing of the augmented repairs exhibited significantly higher stiffness (22-34%), failure load (24-44%), and energy to failure (27-63%) when compared to control tendons with suture repair alone. Potential clinical implications of this novel adhesive biomaterial are discussed. (Some figures in this article are in colour only in the electronic version). © 2011 IOP Publishing Ltd.


Grant
Agency: NSF | Branch: Standard Grant | Program: | Phase: SMALL BUSINESS PHASE I | Award Amount: 150.00K | Year: 2010

This Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) Phase I project proposes to develop a novel biomimetic adhesive for seroma prevention. Commercial bioadhesives have demonstrated mixed results as they are hampered by weak adhesive strengths, the need to mix precursors, and undesirable degradation rates. Thus, there continues to be an unmet clinical need for the development of a new and improved adhesive for seroma prevention. Nerites Corporation has developed adhesives that are synthetic mimics of the mussel adhesive proteins that can bind strongly to rocks and ship hulls in a wet, turbulent saline environment. Nerites? new series of adhesives requires no mixing or dissolution before use, and demonstrates significantly higher strength than currently available adhesives. Therefore, Nerites believes that these new materials will significantly improve clinical outcomes of many patients suffering from seroma.

The broader/commercial impacts of this research are a potential reduction in seroma formation, a postoperative complication in many surgeries. Although the market for Nerites? adhesives may eventually expand to include any surgery where tissue planes are separated, the initial focus involves procedures where postoperative drains are the standard of practice. The benefits that result from reduced use of drains include increased patient comfort, shorter hospital stay, reduced chemotherapy duration, and decreased risk of wound infection. Therefore, Nerites? initially targeted surgical procedures include mastectomy, abdominoplasty, and open ventral hernia repair, with a combined estimate of more than 500,000 surgeries performed annually, where incidences of seroma formation can be as high as 59%.


Trademark
Nerites Corporation | Date: 2010-06-08

Synthetic adhesives and sealants, namely, tissue sealants, and body tissue sealant preparations, for medical use.


Trademark
Nerites Corporation | Date: 2010-06-08

Synthetic adhesives and sealants, namely, tissue sealants, and body tissue sealant preparations, for medical use.


Trademark
Nerites Corporation | Date: 2010-09-21

Synthetic adhesives and sealants, namely, tissue sealants, and body tissue sealant preparations, for medical use.


Patent
Nerites Corporation | Date: 2010-11-29

This invention is directed to a method to reduce microbial fouling on a surface. The present invention provides antifouling coatings similar to the protein glues secreted by marine mussels for adhesion to underwater substrates.


Grant
Agency: Department of Health and Human Services | Branch: | Program: SBIR | Phase: Phase II | Award Amount: 2.21M | Year: 2010

DESCRIPTION (provided by applicant): Novel Polymer Coatings to Prevent Biofilms on Urinary Stents and Catheters Bacterial infection and subsequent encrustation of urinary stents and catheters is a persistent problem in clinical urology and leads to significant patient morbidity and mortality. Most implanted stents become infected at some point, requiring retrieval and re-implantation if the initial treatment duration did not correct the underlying condition. Indeed, more than 90% of patients who have a long-term catheter develop bacteriuria within a month. Considering that about 100 million urethral catheters and urinary stents are inserted each year, millions of device-associated infections occur annually. Various surface modifications to urinary devices have been developed to prevent bacterial adhesion, such as silver-coated surfaces, control-release antibiotics, and surface modification to change hydrophobicity. These approaches have enjoyed varying degrees of success, but all suffer from numerous limitations. Clearly, development of a highly efficacious, long-lasting technology for preventing bacterial infections of urinary stents and catheters would dramatically benefit patients' well-being and quality of life and substantially reduce health care costs. A novel biomimetic strategy to produce surface coatings that repel cells and macromolecules has recently been developed. This strategy was inspired by the unique protein glues that marine mussels secrete for adhesion to various underwater substrates. In brief, antifouling polymers have been coupled to the amino acid L-3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine (DOPA), a key component of so-called mussel adhesive proteins (MAPs). The resulting constructs have greatly reduced protein adsorption, mammalian cell attachment, and microbial attachment to metal and metal oxide surfaces. DOPA is believed to be responsible for anchoring the antifouling polymer to the substrates. In the research conducted in our Phase I feasibility study, we have demonstrated that DOPA-mimic polymers can be successfully synthesized and applied to urinary stent and catheter material surfaces and that the polymer-coated surfaces exhibited a significant reduction in bacterial adhesion compared to uncoated controls. This proposal outlines the synthesis, characterization, and evaluation of two polymers selected from the Phase I study. The two candidate coating polymers will be synthesized in a larger scale to provide sufficient material for the testing, and to determine manufacturability. Application conditions for the coatings will be adjusted to optimize their ability to reduce bacterial adhesion. Long-term, the in vitro efficacy of the candidate coatings will be determined by incubating coated samples with bacterial inoculums for extended periods. Additional experiments will be performed to determine the biocompatibility of these coatings and to test the efficacy of coated urinary stents and catheters in pilot animal models. PUBLIC HEALTH RELEVANCE: Bacterial contamination and encrustation of urinary stents and catheters is a persistent problem in urology, and often leads to urinary tract infection and retrieval and replacement of the implanted devices. Coatings that are designed to prevent bacterial adherent will largely prevent this problem, improving the quality of life for patients and reducing healthcare-related costs.


PubMed | Nerites Corporation
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Biomedical materials (Bristol, England) | Year: 2011

The Achilles tendon is the most frequently ruptured tendon. Both acute and chronic (neglected) tendon ruptures can dramatically affect a patients quality of life, and require a prolonged period of recovery before return to pre-injury activity levels. This paper describes the use of an adhesive-coated biologic scaffold to augment primary suture repair of transected Achilles tendons. The adhesive portion consisted of a synthetic mimic of mussel adhesive proteins that can adhere to various surfaces in a wet environment, including biologic tissues. When combined with biologic scaffolds such as bovine pericardium or porcine dermal tissues, these adhesive constructs demonstrated lap shear adhesive strengths significantly greater than that of fibrin glue, while reaching up to 60% of the strength of a cyanoacrylate-based adhesive. These adhesive constructs were wrapped around transected cadaveric porcine Achilles tendons repaired with a combination of parallel and three-loop suture patterns. Tensile mechanical testing of the augmented repairs exhibited significantly higher stiffness (22-34%), failure load (24-44%), and energy to failure (27-63%) when compared to control tendons with suture repair alone. Potential clinical implications of this novel adhesive biomaterial are discussed.

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