Neotherix Ltd

York, United Kingdom

Neotherix Ltd

York, United Kingdom
SEARCH FILTERS
Time filter
Source Type

Walden G.,University of East Anglia | Liao X.,University of East Anglia | Donell S.,Norwich University | Donell S.,University of East Anglia | And 4 more authors.
Tissue Engineering - Part B: Reviews | Year: 2017

Tendon injury is common and debilitating, and it is associated with long-term pain and ineffective healing. It is estimated to afflict 25% of the adult population and is often a career-ending disease in athletes and racehorses. Tendon injury is associated with high morbidity, pain, and long-term suffering for the patient. Due to the low cellularity and vascularity of tendon tissue, once damage has occurred, the repair process is slow and inefficient, resulting in mechanically, structurally, and functionally inferior tissue. Current treatment options focus on pain management, often being palliative and temporary and ending in reduced function. Most treatments available do not address the underlying cause of the disease and, as such, are often ineffective with variable results. The need for an advanced therapeutic that addresses the underlying pathology is evident. Tissue engineering and regenerative medicine is an emerging field that is aimed at stimulating the body's own repair system to produce de novo tissue through the use of factors such as cells, proteins, and genes that are delivered by a biomaterial scaffold. Successful tissue engineering strategies for tendon regeneration should be built on a foundation of understanding of the molecular and cellular composition of healthy compared with damaged tendon, and the inherent differences seen in the tissue after disease. This article presents a comprehensive clinical, biological, and biomaterials insight into tendon tissue engineering and regeneration toward more advanced therapeutics. © Grace Walden et al., 2017; Published by Mary Ann Liebert, Inc. 2017.


MacKintosh S.B.,University of Swansea | MacKintosh S.B.,Royal Veterinary College | MacKintosh S.B.,Aberystwyth University | Serino L.P.,Neotherix Ltd | And 7 more authors.
Biofabrication | Year: 2015

Endometrial stromal and epithelial cell function is typically studied in vitro using standard twodimensional monocultures, but these cultures fail to reflect the complex three-dimensional (3D) architecture of tissue. A 3Dmodel of bovine endometrium that reflects the architectural arrangement of in vivo tissue would beneficially assist the study of tissue function. An electrospun polyglycolide (PGA) scaffold was selected to grow a 3Dmodel of primary bovine endometrial epithelial and stromal cells, that reflects the architecture of the endometrium for the study of pathophysiology. Electrospun scaffolds were seeded with stromal and epithelial cells, and growth was assessed using histological techniques. Prostaglandin E2 and prostaglandin F2α responsiveness of endometrial scaffold constructs was tested using oxytocin plus arachidonic acid (OT + AA) or lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Stromal and epithelial cells growing on the electrospun scaffold had an architectural arrangement that mimicked whole tissue, deposited fibronectin, had appropriate expression of vimentin and cytokeratin and were responsive toOT+ AA and LPS, as measured by prostaglandin accumulation. In conclusion, a functional 3D model of stromal and epithelial cells was developed using a PGA electrospun scaffold which may be used to study endometrial pathophysiology. © 2015 IOP Publishing Ltd.


Bubela T.,University of Alberta | McCabe C.,University of Alberta | Archibald P.,Loughborough University | Atkins H.,Ottawa Hospital Research Institute | And 8 more authors.
Regenerative Medicine | Year: 2015

Significant investments in regenerative medicine necessitate discussion to align evidentiary requirements and decision-making considerations from regulatory, health system payer and developer perspectives. Only with coordinated efforts will the potential of regenerative medicine be realized. We report on discussions from two workshops sponsored by NICE, University of Alberta, Cell Therapy Catapult and Centre for Commercialization of Regenerative Medicine. We discuss methods to support the assessment of value for regenerative medicine products and services and the synergies that exist between market authorization and reimbursement regulations and practices. We discuss the convergence in novel adaptive licensing practices that may promote the development and adoption of novel therapeutics that meet the needs of healthcare payers. © 2015 Tania Bubela.


PubMed | Emedits Global Ltd, Catapult, University of Toronto, Loughborough University and 7 more.
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Regenerative medicine | Year: 2015

Significant investments in regenerative medicine necessitate discussion to align evidentiary requirements and decision-making considerations from regulatory, health system payer and developer perspectives. Only with coordinated efforts will the potential of regenerative medicine be realized. We report on discussions from two workshops sponsored by NICE, University of Alberta, Cell Therapy Catapult and Centre for Commercialization of Regenerative Medicine. We discuss methods to support the assessment of value for regenerative medicine products and services and the synergies that exist between market authorization and reimbursement regulations and practices. We discuss the convergence in novel adaptive licensing practices that may promote the development and adoption of novel therapeutics that meet the needs of healthcare payers.


Grant
Agency: GTR | Branch: Innovate UK | Program: | Phase: Innovation Voucher | Award Amount: 5.00K | Year: 2015

Neotherix Ltd is a regenerative medicine company specialising in the development of bioresorbable scaffolds for tissue regeneration and repair. The company has recently developed an interest in the use of specific wavelengths of light at the skin surface for the control of bacterial infections.


Grant
Agency: GTR | Branch: Innovate UK | Program: | Phase: Collaborative Research & Development | Award Amount: 203.40K | Year: 2012

Neotherix (York UK) has developed the EktoTherix™ bioresorbable scaffold material that assists patient tissue repair and regeneration, with an initial target clinical application of non-melanoma skin cancers (NMSC) with further indications to follow. A patch of the material is used following excision of the basal or squamous carcinoma by the clinician, and this rapidly allows the wound space to be filled with (and then covered by) the patients’ own skin cells. This TSB funded project will continue the development of the product towards full commercialisation, with further development of the product registration package leading to a clinical evaluation involving a small number of patients. The team will also complete a health economics evaluation prior to launching the product within the UK and EU market in 2013/2014. The estimated global market for this product for NMSC alone is £867m pa.


Patent
NEOTHERIX Ltd | Date: 2012-10-03

A medical sampling device, a method of manufacturing the device, and methods of testing and diagnosis using the device; a sampling dressing comprising the device, a method of manufacturing the dressing, and a method of diagnosis using the dressing; and a therapy dressing comprising the device, a method of manufacturing the dressing, and a method of treatment using the dressing. The a sampling device comprises a biodegradable porous scaffold which in use lies in contact with tissue to be sampled and comprises a fluid, in particular a reversibly thermoswitchable gel.


Grant
Agency: GTR | Branch: Innovate UK | Program: | Phase: Smart - Proof of Market | Award Amount: 14.99K | Year: 2013

The project proposed in this application has the aim of exploring the attractiveness of a number of demanding technical options for increasing the proportion of the market addressable by Neotherix’ electrospun scaffold technology. We will consider the benefits of seeding the scaffold with autologous cells before administration to the patient and of a system for the intra-operative manufacture of scaffolds tailored to the needs of individual (or groups of) patients. We will also examine the relative advantages and disadvantages of synthetic acellular scaffolds and of biologic acellular scaffolds with a view to establishing the prime clinical indications for which synthetic electrospun scaffolds are favoured. In each case, we will gather the views of clinical specialists on clinical needs that could be addressed by the innovative product and process design technology supporting these options. We will also work with clinicians and review the literature to determine the anticipated benefits to patients and the NHS (and other health systems). The project will examine the route to market of the two broad product concepts outlined above so that the regulatory classification and market access challenges are understood and documented. The size and dynamics of the potential market and the trends in disease and surgical incidence will be analysed using literature reviews and market reports and used as items in a selection matrix to which all product concepts - generated in-house or through consultation with clinicians – are submitted. The main output of the project will be a report on the lead options and applications for product development. A full assessment of the possible product or process concepts will be made and the most attractive of these will be recommended to be taken forward to a Smart Proof of Concept application. The feasibility of producing scaffolds at a price appropriate to the chosen markets will also be considered .

Loading Neotherix Ltd collaborators
Loading Neotherix Ltd collaborators