Neonatal Services

Australia

Neonatal Services

Australia
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Jacobs S.E.,Neonatal Services | Jacobs S.E.,Critical Care and Neurosciences Group | Tobin J.M.,North West Academic Center | Opie G.F.,Mercy Hospital for Women | And 8 more authors.
Pediatrics | Year: 2013

BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVE: Late-onset sepsis frequently complicates prematurity, contributing to morbidity and mortality. Probiotics may reduce mortality and necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC) in preterm infants, with unclear effect on late-onset sepsis. This study aimed to determine the effect of administering a specific combination of probiotics to very preterm infants on culture-proven late-onset sepsis. METHODS: A prospective multicenter, double-blinded, placebocontrolled, randomized trial compared daily administration of a probiotic combination (Bifidobacterium infantis, Streptococcus thermophilus, and Bifidobacterium lactis, containing 1 3 109 total organisms) with placebo (maltodextrin) in infants born before 32 completed weeks' gestation weighing ,1500 g. The primary outcome was at least 1 episode of definite late-onset sepsis. RESULTS: Between October 2007 and November 2011, 1099 very preterm infants from Australia and New Zealand were randomized. Rates of definite late-onset sepsis (16.2%), NEC of Bell stage 2 or more (4.4%), and mortality (5.1%) were low in controls, with high breast milk feeding rates (96.9%). No significant difference in definite late-onset sepsis or all-cause mortality was found, but this probiotic combination reduced NEC of Bell stage 2 or more (2.0% versus 4.4%; relative risk 0.46, 95% confidence interval 0.23 to 0.93, P = .03; number needed to treat 43, 95% confidence interval 23 to 333). CONCLUSIONS: The probiotics B infantis, S thermophilus, and B lactis significantly reduced NEC of Bell stage 2 or more in very preterm infants, but not definite late-onset sepsis or mortality. Treatment with this combination of probiotics appears to be safe. Pediatrics 2013;132:1055- 1062. © 2013 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.


News Article | February 22, 2017
Site: globenewswire.com

NEW YORK, Feb. 22, 2017 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- Dr. Sharon Metcalfe, Interim Director of Nursing at Western Carolina University, has been selected to join the Education Board at the American Health Council. She will be sharing her knowledge and expertise on Nursing Education and Clinical / Didactic Testing. A photo accompanying this announcement is available at http://www.globenewswire.com/NewsRoom/AttachmentNg/0ead4c6b-51d4-40e9-90ea-cb328bbfeb1a With over a decade of experience in the field of Nursing Education, Dr. Metcalfe offers valuable insight in her role as the Interim Director of Nursing at Western Carolina University. Located in Cullowhee, North Carolina, Western Carolina University is a public regional institution of higher education that is committed to offering quality education at an affordable rate.  Ranked as one of the top fifteen public regional institutions in the South, WCU give prospective students an opportunity to choose from more than a hundred and fifteen majors and concentrations ranging from Biology, Computer Information Systems, Spanish, Business Administration and much more. As the Interim Director of Nursing at Western Carolina University, Dr. Metcalfe’s day-to-day responsibilities include oversight of programs and forty facilities, management of scholarships, the university budget, and community groups. Prior to her role as the Interim Director, Dr. Metcalfe gained leadership experience as the Dean of Nursing for at Lees-McRae College and Mayland Community College. In the clinical setting, Dr. Metcalfe has served as the Director of Pediatrics (Denver, Colorado Children's Hospital), Director of Neonatal Services at Rose Medical Center (Denver, Colorado), and Nursing Administrator of Pediatrics, Critical Care, Intensive Care, and Neonatal Intensive Care at Wake Forest Medical Center-Baptist Hospital (Winston-Salem, North Carolina). In 1997, Dr. Metcalfe earned her Doctorate of Education in Adult and Community College Education from the North Carolina State University. She went on to complete a Bachelor of Science in Nursing degree and receive certification as a Registered Nurse from the University of Colorado. Dr. Metcalfe maintains affiliations with the North Carolina Nurses Association and Sigma Theta Tao. She serves on the Board of Directors for the Mountain Area Health Education Minority and Underrepresented Students Council, and the Board of Directors for the Social Services division of Asheville, North Carolina. Dr. Metcalfe’s desire to pursue Nursing Education developed through a natural progression. Looking back, she attributes her success to her supportive husband Lee and her loving son Trevor. Due to her commitment and dedication to the field of Nursing Education, Dr. Metcalfe has been awarded the 2016 Health Science College Award, 2006 100 Best Nurses Award, and 2005 Native American Teacher of the Year. Among her many accomplishments, Dr. Metcalfe has published three significant articles on mentoring, social determinants and educational barriers for diverse students, and the nature of cultural competency. In her free time, she enjoys traveling to Europe. As a certified Parent Child Interventionist, Dr. Metcalfe volunteers her time being a high risk parenting educator for the Department of Social Work conducting seminars for foster parents that struggle with difficult children during the fall of each year. Considering her future, Dr. Metcalfe hopes for continual growth in research, and education by teaching a RN to BSN program.

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