Neonatal Medicine

Country Club, CA, United States

Neonatal Medicine

Country Club, CA, United States
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News Article | October 28, 2016
Site: www.prfire.com

New Film “Microbirth” Reveals the Microscopic Secrets of Childbirth [http://microbirth.com] – A new documentary “MICROBIRTH” warns how our children are born could have serious repercussions for their lifelong health. “Microbirth” looks at childbirth in a whole new way; through the lens of a microscope. Featuring Ivy League scientists, the film investigates the latest research that is starting to indicate modern birth practices could be interfering with critical biological processes. This could be making our children more susceptible to disease later in life. Recent population studies have shown babies born by Caesarean Section have approximately: 20% increased risk of developing asthma 20% increased risk of developing type 1 diabetes 20% increased risk of obesity slightly smaller increases with gastro-intestinal conditions like Crohn’s disease or coeliac disease. These conditions are all linked to the immune system. In the film, scientists hypothesise that Caesarean Section could be interfering with “the seeding of the baby’s microbiome”. This is an important microbiological process where bacteria is transferred from mother to baby in the birth canal. As a consequence, the baby’s immune system may not develop to its full potential. Another hypothesis is that the stresses and hormones associated with natural birth could switch on or off certain genes related to the immune system and metabolism. If a baby is born by C-Section, this might affect these epigenetic processes. Dr Rodney R Dietert, Professor of Immunotoxicology at Cornell University, says, “Over the past 20-30 years, we’ve seen dramatic increases in childhood asthma, type 1 diabetes, coeliac disease, childhood obesity. We’ve also seen increases in Caesarean delivery. Does Caesarean cause these conditions? No. What Caesarean does is not allow the baby to be seeded with the microbes. The immune system doesn’t mature. And the metabolism changes. It’s the immune dysfunction and the changes in metabolism that we now know contribute to those diseases and conditions.” Dr Matthew Hyde, Research Associate of Neonatal Medicine, Imperial College London says, ”We are increasingly seeing a world out there with what is really a public health time-bomb waiting to go off. And the research we are doing suggests it is only going to get worse, generation on generation. So tomorrow’s generation really is on the edge of the precipice unless we can begin to do something about it.” The film’s co-Director Toni Harman says, “The very latest scientific research is starting to indicate that the microscopic processes happening during childbirth could be critical for the life-long health of the baby. We are hoping “Microbirth” raises awareness of the importance of “seeding the microbiome” for all babies, whether born naturally or by C-Section, to give all children the best chance of a healthy life. This could be an exciting opportunity to improve health across populations. And it all starts at birth”. “MICROBIRTH” is premiering with hundreds of simultaneous grass-roots public screenings around the world on Saturday 20th September 2014. http://microbirth.com/events – High-res images and academics available for interview upon request. – Short synopsis of “Microbirth”: “Microbirth” is a new sixty minute documentary looking at birth in a whole new way: through the lens of a microscope. Investigating the latest scientific research, the film reveals how we give birth could impact the lifelong health of our children. http://microbirth.com – “Microbirth” is an independent production by Alto Films Ltd. The film has been produced and directed by British filmmaking couple, Toni Harman and Alex Wakeford. Their previous film “Freedom For Birth” premiered in over 1,100 public screenings in 50 countries in September 2012. – “Microbirth” will premiere at grass-roots public screenings around the world on Saturday 20th September 2014. The film will then be represented for international broadcast sales as well as being available via online platforms. For a full list of screenings, please visit: http://microbirth.com/events – For more information about the film, please visit http://microbirth.com – “Microbirth” includes the following scientists and academics: RODNEY DIETERT, Professor of Immunotoxicology, Cornell University MARTIN BLASER, Director of the Human Microbiome Program & Professor of Translational Medicine, New York University MARIA GLORIA DOMINGUEZ BELLO, Associate Professor, Department of Medicine, New York University PHILIP STEER, Emeritus Professor of Obstetrics, Imperial College, London NEENA MODI, Professor of Neonatal Medicine, Imperial College, London MATTHEW HYDE, Research Associate in the Section of Neonatal Medicine, Imperial College, London SUE CARTER, Professor, Behavioral Neurobiologist, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill ALEECA BELL, Assistant Professor, Dept of Women, Children and Family Health Science, University of Illinois at Chicago STEFAN ELBE, Professor of International Relations, University of Sussex and Director of Centre for Global Health Policy ANITA KOZYRSKYJ, Professor, Department of Pediatrics, University of Alberta and Co-Principal Investigator, Synergy in Microbiota Research (SyMBIOTA) JACQUELYN TAYLOR, Associate Professor of Nursing, University of Yale HANNAH DAHLEN, Professor of Midwifery, University of Western Sydney LESLEY PAGE, Professor of Midwifery, King’s College London and President, Royal College of Midwives


News Article | November 22, 2016
Site: www.eurekalert.org

ROCHESTER, Minn. -- Approximately 10 percent of newborns require help breathing after birth, and 1 in 1,000 newborns require more intensive resuscitation measures. These infrequent, high-risk deliveries may present challenges to community hospitals less familiar with advanced newborn resuscitation interventions. Telemedicine consultations are a good option to help meet these challenges and positively impact patient care, according to a study published in Mayo Clinic Proceedings. "Following a complicated delivery, a newborn's outcome is associated with the quality of care provided during the first minutes of life," says Jennifer Fang, M.D., a Mayo Clinic fellow in Neonatal-Perinatal Medicine and one of the study's authors. "Because of this reason, it is critical to understand how telemedicine can be used to positively impact those outcomes." During a 20-month study, Mayo Clinic's Division of Neonatal Medicine worked with six health system sites to provide newborn telemedicine consultations. During the study, 84 telemedicine consultations were conducted. "The enhanced access to neonatologists, who could remotely assess the newborn and guide the local care team through the resuscitation, allowed one-third of the babies to stay with their families in the local hospital," says Dr. Fang. "This allowed the patients to receive the correct level of care in the right location -- increasing the value of care. Also, the potential cost savings can be substantial." This study also looked at how the local care team and neonatologist collaborated. "Other research has shown that teamwork and communication are critical during neonatal emergencies. We wanted to assess how telemedicine affected teamwork and communication," according to Dr. Fang. Providers responded positively to surveys that assessed teamwork and the impact of the telemedicine consult on patient safety and quality of care. "These results speak to the acceptability and clinical impact of this type of telemedicine project in community hospitals," says Dr. Fang. In addition to Dr. Fang, the paper's co-authors are: Mayo Clinic Proceedings is a monthly peer-reviewed medical journal that publishes original articles and reviews dealing with clinical and laboratory medicine, clinical research, basic science research and clinical epidemiology. Mayo Clinic Proceedings is sponsored by the Mayo Foundation for Medical Education and Research as part of its commitment to physician education. It publishes submissions from authors worldwide. The journal has been published for more than 80 years and has a circulation of 130,000. Articles are available at mayoclinicproceedings.org. Mayo Clinic is a nonprofit organization committed to clinical practice, education and research, providing expert, whole-person care to everyone who needs healing. For more information, visit http://www. or http://newsnetwork. . MULTIMEDIA ALERT: Video and audio are available for download on the Mayo Clinic News Network.


News Article | December 5, 2016
Site: www.businesswire.com

NASHVILLE, Tenn. & GREENWOOD VILLAGE, Colo.--(BUSINESS WIRE)--The Physician Services business of Envision Healthcare Corporation (NYSE: EVHC) has further expanded its Women’s and Children’s Services specialty, and its footprint in Alabama, through the acquisition of Alabama Neonatal Medicine, P.C. The group’s four physicians exclusively cover the neonatology units at Jackson Hospital, Baptist Medical Center East and Baptist Medical Center South in the Montgomery, Alabama, area. This combination provides a complement to Envision’s existing neonatal programs in Huntsville, Mobile, and Dothan, Alabama. Dr. Allen Newton, MD, President of Alabama Neonatal Medicine, commented, “We at Alabama Neonatal Medicine are excited about joining our efforts with Envision Healthcare. Our focus has always been on improving the healthcare of infants in central Alabama. Envision not only shares this goal, but will bring its unparalleled expertise and resources to this endeavor. Working together with the region’s hospitals and other medical providers, we will strive to enhance the healthcare experiences and outcomes of young children and their families throughout central Alabama.” Robert J. Coward, President of Envision’s Physician Services business, noted, “We are excited to have been chosen by the physicians of Alabama Neonatal Medicine as their strategic partner in growing their practice and providing the necessary resources to thrive in a dynamic healthcare environment. At Envision, we are committed to the growth and development of each of our service lines, and this practice is a great addition to our Women’s and Children’s specialty.” Envision Healthcare Corporation is a leading provider of physician-led services, ambulatory surgery center management, post-acute care and medical transportation. Physician-led services encompass providers at 780 hospitals in 45 states and include leadership positions in emergency department and hospitalist services, anesthesiology, radiology, and women’s / children’s services, as well as offerings in general surgery and office-based medicine. As a market leader in ambulatory surgical care, the company owns and operates 260 surgery centers and one surgical hospital in 35 states and the District of Columbia, with medical specialties ranging from gastroenterology to ophthalmology and orthopedics. Post-acute care is delivered through an array of clinical professionals and integrated technologies designed to contribute to efficient and effective population health management strategies. As a leader in healthcare transportation services, the company operates in 39 states and the District of Columbia. In total, the company offers a differentiated suite of clinical solutions on a national scale, creating value for health systems, payors, providers and patients. For additional information, visit www.evhc.net. Certain statements and information in this communication may be deemed to be “forward-looking statements” within the meaning of the Federal Private Securities Litigation Reform Act of 1995. Forward-looking statements may include, but are not limited to, statements relating to Envision Healthcare Corporation’s (the “Company”) objectives, plans and strategies, and all statements (other than statements of historical facts) that address activities, events or developments that the Company intends, expects, projects, believes or anticipates will or may occur in the future. These statements are often characterized by terminology such as “believe,” “hope,” “may,” “anticipate,” “should,” “intend,” “plan,” “will,” “expect,” “estimate,” “project,” “positioned,” “strategy” and similar expressions, and are based on assumptions and assessments made by the Company’s management in light of their experience and their perception of historical trends, current conditions, expected future developments, and other factors they believe to be appropriate. Any forward-looking statements in this communication are made as of the date hereof, and the Company undertakes no duty to update or revise any such statements, whether as a result of new information, future events or otherwise. Forward-looking statements are not guarantees of future performance. Whether actual results will conform to expectations and predictions is subject to known and unknown risks and uncertainties, including: (i) risks and uncertainties discussed in the reports that each of the Company, Envision and AMSURG have filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission; (ii) general economic, market, or business conditions; (iii) the impact of legislative or regulatory changes, such as changes to the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act, as amended by the Health Care and Education Reconciliation Act of 2010; (iv) changes in governmental reimbursement programs; (v) decreases in revenue and profit margin under fee-for-service contracts due to changes in volume, payor mix and reimbursement rates; (vi) the loss of existing contracts; (vii) risks associated with the ability to successfully integrate the Company’s operations and employees following the merger; (viii) the ability to realize anticipated benefits and synergies of the business combination; and (ix) the potential impact of the consummation of the transaction on the Company’s relationships, including with employees, customers and competitors; and (x) other circumstances beyond the Company’s control. Refer to the section entitled “Risk Factors” in each of Envision’s and AMSURG’s annual and quarterly reports filed in 2016 for a discussion of important factors that could cause actual results, developments and business decisions to differ materially from forward-looking statements.


News Article | February 21, 2017
Site: www.eurekalert.org

They call for a new global alliance to advance effective actions against child obesity The UK's action plan to significantly reduce childhood obesity is "severely limited", argue a team of experts in The BMJ today. They say the government missed an opportunity to take global leadership of child health Professor Mark Hanson from the British Heart Foundation, University of Southampton, Professor Neena Modi, President of the UK Royal College of Paediatrics and Child Health, and Professor of Neonatal Medicine, Imperial College London, and Dr Edward Mullins, a trainee in obstetrics and gynaecology, criticise a number of key failings within the report. They say following publication of the report 'Childhood Obesity: a Plan for Action" last year, there was an "immediate outcry from the medical and public health communities, who had hoped for much more." They warn that "strong actions were conspicuous by their absence, and the desired discussion of anti-obesogenic medicine [countering obesity onset] had been watered down to an emphasis on voluntary actions by industry, consumers, and schools." The report, they say, "fails to recognise that overweight and obesity in children and young people are driven by multiple modifiable biological, behavioural, environmental, and commercial factors, some of which operate before conception and birth." Furthermore, the report does not "recognise that the harm extends across generations," and "this failure", they say, represents "a major lost opportunity for effective prevention." The report also does not include the World Health Organization's (WHO) Commission on Ending Childhood Obesity (ECHO) recommendations, and by doing so, the UK government 'missed an opportunity to show global leadership in child health." They say it could be considerably strengthened by including evidence based interventions, such as an industry levy on sugar sweetened beverages, nutrient profiling to identify healthy and unhealthy foods, clearer food labelling, and promoting physical activity in schools. Other recommendations absent from the report include stronger controls on advertising, mandatory food reformulation, and nutrition education. They say to achieve these recommendations, health professionals should use their national and global professional networks to coordinate action between sectors including education, industry, government, and the public. As such, they suggest a new global alliance against child obesity led by an international alliance of healthcare organisations, which "the UK government would work with the alliance to build on their plan for action and develop it into a strategy for childhood and future societal health." They recommend the new alliance should focus on a life course approach, where the preconception period is an "important opportunity for engaging parents to prevent obesity and promote health." Furthermore, there needs to be effective training of health and education professionals on how to engage parents, children, and young people with the issue of overweight and obesity. Experts need to formulate key questions around preventive measures and methods of implementation, and to set key research priorities on infancy and the preconception period. They stress that dialogue needs to be encouraged between industry, policy makers, scientists, educators, professional bodies, children and young people. Lastly, they call for campaigning of government actions on policies, regulation, fiscal actions, and investment, as some of these have brought "enormous benefits" to child and population health, while voluntary action has been ineffective. Analysis: Time for the UK to commit to tackling child obesity http://www. BMJ is a healthcare knowledge provider that aims to advance healthcare worldwide by sharing knowledge and expertise to improve experiences, outcomes and value. For a full list of BMJ products and services, please visit bmj.com/company


Waqar T.,CMH Medical College Lahore | Haque K.N.,Neonatal Medicine
Pakistan Paediatric Journal | Year: 2012

Birth asphyxia is one of the leading causes of neonatal mortality and morbidity in Pakistan. Large proportions of survivors go on to develop cerebral palsy contributing to the largest group of intellectually and physically challenged individuals in our society. This paper after briefly discussing the epidemiology and patho-physiology of birth asphyxia provides pragmatic but evidence based guidelines on the management of neonates suffering from birth asphyxia in Pakistan.

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