Neol Biosolutions SA

Granada, Spain

Neol Biosolutions SA

Granada, Spain
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Adrio J.L.,Neol Biosolutions SA | Demain A.L.,Drew University
Biomolecules | Year: 2014

Microbial enzymes are of great importance in the development of industrial bioprocesses. Current applications are focused on many different markets including pulp and paper, leather, detergents and textiles, pharmaceuticals, chemical, food and beverages, biofuels, animal feed and personal care, among others. Today there is a need for new, improved or/and more versatile enzymes in order to develop more novel, sustainable and economically competitive production processes. Microbial diversity and modern molecular techniques, such as metagenomics and genomics, are being used to discover new microbial enzymes whose catalytic properties can be improved/modified by different strategies based on rational, semi-rational and random directed evolution. Most industrial enzymes are recombinant forms produced in bacteria and fungi.


PubMed | Drew University and Neol Biosolutions SA
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Biomolecules | Year: 2014

Microbial enzymes are of great importance in the development of industrial bioprocesses. Current applications are focused on many different markets including pulp and paper, leather, detergents and textiles, pharmaceuticals, chemical, food and beverages, biofuels, animal feed and personal care, among others. Today there is a need for new, improved or/and more versatile enzymes in order to develop more novel, sustainable and economically competitive production processes. Microbial diversity and modern molecular techniques, such as metagenomics and genomics, are being used to discover new microbial enzymes whose catalytic properties can be improved/modified by different strategies based on rational, semi-rational and random directed evolution. Most industrial enzymes are recombinant forms produced in bacteria and fungi.


Fillet S.,Neol Biosolutions SA | Adrio J.L.,Neol Biosolutions SA
World Journal of Microbiology and Biotechnology | Year: 2016

Fatty alcohols have numerous commercial applications, including their use as lubricants, surfactants, solvents, emulsifiers, plasticizers, emollients, thickeners, and even fuels. Fatty alcohols are currently produced by catalytic hydrogenation of fatty acids from plant oils or animal fats. Microbial production of fatty alcohols may be a more direct and environmentally-friendly strategy since production is carried out by heterologous enzymes, called fatty acyl-CoA reductases, able to reduce different acyl-CoA molecules to their corresponding primary alcohols. Successful examples of metabolic engineering have been reported in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Escherichia coli in which the production of fatty alcohols ranged from 1.2 to 1.9 g/L, respectively. Due to their metabolic advantages, oleaginous yeasts are considered the best hosts for production of fatty acid-derived chemicals. Some of these species can naturally produce, under specific growth conditions, lipids at high titers (>50 g/L) and therefore provide large amounts of fatty acyl-CoAs or fatty acids as precursors. Very recently, taking advantage of such features, over 8 g/L of C16–C18 fatty alcohols have been produced in Rhodosporidium toruloides. In this review we summarize the different metabolic engineering strategies, hosts and cultivation conditions used to date. We also point out some future trends and challenges for the microbial production of fatty alcohols. © 2016, Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht.


Fillet S.,Neol Biosolutions SA | Gibert J.,Neol Biosolutions SA | Suarez B.,Neol Biosolutions SA | Lara A.,Neol Biosolutions SA | And 2 more authors.
Journal of Industrial Microbiology and Biotechnology | Year: 2015

We have engineered Rhodosporidium toruloides to produce fatty alcohols by expressing a fatty acyl-CoA reductase from Marinobacter aquaeolei VT8. Production of fatty alcohols in flasks was achieved in different fermentation media at titers ranging from 0.2 to 2 g/L. In many of the conditions tested, more than 80 % of fatty alcohols were secreted into the cultivation broth. Through fed-batch fermentation in 7 L bioreactors, over 8 g/L of C16–C18 fatty alcohols were produced using sucrose as the substrate. This is the highest titer ever reported on microbial production of fatty alcohols to date. © 2015, The Author(s).


Patent
Neol Biosolutions S.A. | Date: 2016-04-20

The present invention relates to the Rhodosporidium toruloides CECT 13085 strain, as well as to uses thereof for obtaining microbial biomass rich in triglycerides and for producing oils of a microbial origin in the presence of lignocellulosic biomass hydrolysates.


Patent
Neol Biosolutions S.A. | Date: 2014-06-09

The present invention relates to the Rhodosporidium toruloides CECT 13085 strain, as well as to uses thereof for obtaining microbial biomass rich in triglycerides and for producing oils of a microbial origin in the presence of lignocellulosic biomass hydrolysates.


Patent
Neol Biosolutions S.A. | Date: 2015-06-24

The present invention relates to the production of bioplastics in which a microorganism of the Pseudomonas putida species has been isolated and identified and has been found to be a super-producer naturally capable of: a) metabolizing different carbon sources, including aromatic derivatives, b) growing at high cellular concentrations, and c) producing a large amount of polyhydroxyalkanoates or 3-hydroxy acids.


PubMed | Neol Biosolutions SA
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Journal of industrial microbiology & biotechnology | Year: 2015

We have engineered Rhodosporidium toruloides to produce fatty alcohols by expressing a fatty acyl-CoA reductase from Marinobacter aquaeolei VT8. Production of fatty alcohols in flasks was achieved in different fermentation media at titers ranging from 0.2 to 2 g/L. In many of the conditions tested, more than 80 % of fatty alcohols were secreted into the cultivation broth. Through fed-batch fermentation in 7 L bioreactors, over 8 g/L of C(16)-C(18) fatty alcohols were produced using sucrose as the substrate. This is the highest titer ever reported on microbial production of fatty alcohols to date.


PubMed | Neol Biosolutions SA
Type: Journal Article | Journal: World journal of microbiology & biotechnology | Year: 2016

Fatty alcohols have numerous commercial applications, including their use as lubricants, surfactants, solvents, emulsifiers, plasticizers, emollients, thickeners, and even fuels. Fatty alcohols are currently produced by catalytic hydrogenation of fatty acids from plant oils or animal fats. Microbial production of fatty alcohols may be a more direct and environmentally-friendly strategy since production is carried out by heterologous enzymes, called fatty acyl-CoA reductases, able to reduce different acyl-CoA molecules to their corresponding primary alcohols. Successful examples of metabolic engineering have been reported in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Escherichia coli in which the production of fatty alcohols ranged from 1.2 to 1.9g/L, respectively. Due to their metabolic advantages, oleaginous yeasts are considered the best hosts for production of fatty acid-derived chemicals. Some of these species can naturally produce, under specific growth conditions, lipids at high titers (>50g/L) and therefore provide large amounts of fatty acyl-CoAs or fatty acids as precursors. Very recently, taking advantage of such features, over 8g/L of C16-C18 fatty alcohols have been produced in Rhodosporidium toruloides. In this review we summarize the different metabolic engineering strategies, hosts and cultivation conditions used to date. We also point out some future trends and challenges for the microbial production of fatty alcohols.


PubMed | Neol Biosolutions S.A.
Type: | Journal: Biochemical pharmacology | Year: 2016

The need for new antifungal agents is undeniable. Current therapeutic choices for the treatment of invasive fungal infections are limited to three classes of drugs. Most used antifungal agents are not completely effective due to the development of resistance, host toxicity and undesirable side effects that limit their use in medical practice. Invasive fungal infections have significantly increased over the last decades and the mortality rates remain unacceptably high. More threatening, new resistance patterns have been observed including simultaneous resistance to different antifungal classes. In the last years, deeper insights into the molecular mechanisms for fungal resistance and virulence have yielded some new potential targets for antifungal therapeutics. Chemical genomics-based screenings, high throughput screenings of natural products and repurposing of approved drugs are some of the approaches being followed for the discovery of new antifungal molecules. However, despite the emerging need for effective antifungal agents, the current pipeline contains only a few promising molecules, with novel modes of action, in early clinical development stages.

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