Lincoln, NE, United States
Lincoln, NE, United States

Nebraska Wesleyan University is a private, coeducational university located in Lincoln, Nebraska, United States. It was founded in 1887 by Nebraska Methodists. As of 2007, it has 1,600 full-time students and 300 faculty and staff. The school teaches in the tradition of a liberal arts college education. Nebraska Wesleyan was ranked the #1 liberal arts college in Nebraska by U.S. News and World Report in 2002. In 2009, Forbes ranked it 84th of America's Best Colleges. It remains affiliated with the United Methodist Church. Wikipedia.


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News Article | May 18, 2017
Site: www.prweb.com

Huffman Engineering, Inc., a leader in control systems integration, today announced the recent hiring of Mechanical Engineer Jared Nelson, Electrical Engineer Justin Gilg, and Marketing & Administrative Assistant Gabrielle Wythers to support the company in its development and execution of turnkey automation projects for manufacturing and utility customers. “Jared, Justin and Gabby are outstanding additions to the Huffman team,” said Howard Huffman, CEO, Huffman Engineering. “I admire their enthusiasm for gaining knowledge and experience, and I look forward to seeing what they will accomplish at the company in the coming months and years.” Jared Nelson joins Huffman Engineering after his recent graduation from the Iowa State University Honors Program with a Bachelor of Science in Mechanical Engineering. Nelson gained professional experience at Omaha Public Power District as an Operations Engineer and at Hood Packaging Corporation as a Processing Engineer. While at ISU, Nelson worked as a mechanical engineering peer mentor for freshmen students and was a tour leader for the Iowa State Engineering Ambassadors and Mentoring Program. Justin Gilg joins Huffman Engineering as an Electrical Engineer, after working at the company as a co-op student for the past two years. Gilg is a recent graduate of the University of Nebraska and holds a Bachelor of Science in Electrical Engineering. While studying at UNL, he received the James Canfield Scholarship and was an Engineering Dean’s Scholar. Gilg is an Eagle Scout with the BSA. Gabrielle Wythers joins Huffman Engineering as a marketing & administrative assistant. Wythers is a recent graduate of Nebraska Wesleyan University, earning a Bachelor of Science with a major in Business Administration and minor in Human Resource Management. Wythers also studied at Iowa Lakes Community College where she maintained an exceptional GPA. Wythers was previously employed as a mediator for the Nebraska Attorney General’s Office and as an assistant at Heinisch and Lovegrove Law Office. About Huffman Engineering, Inc. Huffman Engineering, Inc. is CSIA Certified control systems integration company offering turnkey engineering design and control systems integration services to manufacturing and utility customers. The company’s highly-skilled team of electrical/mechanical engineers, and experienced technicians practice a proven, results-driven project methodology to consistently deliver optimal industrial automation solutions. Based in Lincoln, Nebraska, with a second office in Greenwood Village, Colorado, Huffman Engineering has served the Midwest since 1987. The company specializes in pharmaceutical, life science, machine, and utility process control applications. For more information, visit HuffmanEng.com.


News Article | April 17, 2017
Site: www.prweb.com

LearnHowToBecome.org, a leading resource provider for higher education and career information, has released its ranking of Nebraska’s best colleges for 2017. Of the 20 four-year schools included on the list, Creighton University, Nebraska Wesleyan University, University of Nebraska Lincoln, Doane College Crete and Hastings College were the top five schools. Of the 9 two-year schools included in the ranking, Western Nebraska Community College, Mid-Plains Community College, Metropolitan Community College, Northeast Community College and Southeast Community College were the top five. A full list of schools is included below. “A strong educational foundation can open a lot of doors when it comes to starting a new career,” said Wes Ricketts, senior vice president of LearnHowToBecome.org. “These Nebraska colleges and universities have distinguished themselves by providing excellent service to student through quality degree programs and career resources.” To be included on the “Best Colleges in Nebraska” list, schools must be regionally accredited, not-for-profit institutions. Each college is also analyzed based on additional metrics including program offerings, employment services, academic counseling, opportunities for financial aid, graduation rates and student/teacher ratios. Complete details on each college, their individual scores and the data and methodology used to determine the LearnHowToBecome.org “Best Colleges in Nebraska” list, visit: Nebraska’s Best Four-Year Colleges for 2017 include: Bellevue University Chadron State College Clarkson College College of Saint Mary Concordia University-Nebraska Creighton University Doane College-Crete Grace University Hastings College Midland University Nebraska Methodist College of Nursing & Allied Health Nebraska Wesleyan University Peru State College Union College University of Nebraska at Kearney University of Nebraska at Omaha University of Nebraska Medical Center University of Nebraska-Lincoln Wayne State College York College Nebraska’s Best Two-Year Colleges for 2017 include: Central Community College Little Priest Tribal College Metropolitan Community College Mid-Plains Community College Nebraska College of Technical Agriculture Nebraska Indian Community College Northeast Community College Southeast Community College Western Nebraska Community College ### About Us: LearnHowtoBecome.org was founded in 2013 to provide data and expert driven information about employment opportunities and the education needed to land the perfect career. Our materials cover a wide range of professions, industries and degree programs, and are designed for people who want to choose, change or advance their careers. We also provide helpful resources and guides that address social issues, financial aid and other special interest in higher education. Information from LearnHowtoBecome.org has proudly been featured by more than 700 educational institutions.


Duttwyler S.,University of Zürich | Douvris C.,University of Colorado | Fackler N.L.P.,Nebraska Wesleyan University | Tham F.S.,University of Zürich | And 3 more authors.
Angewandte Chemie - International Edition | Year: 2010

Si(mply) rips it apart: C-F activation of fluorobenzene has been achieved using the extremely strong silyl Lewis acids [Et3Si(X)]+ (X=PhF or Et3SiH) and [(2,6-dixylyl-C6H 3)SiMe2] + paired with the anion CHB 11Cl11 -. They abstract fluoride from unactivated fluorobenzene to give arylated products, consistent with phenyl-cation-like reactivity (see scheme). © 2010 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA.


News Article | November 11, 2016
Site: www.sciencedaily.com

The transparent belly of a tiny beast has revealed how algae-infecting chloroviruses bloom in freshwater around the world, says a new study from the University of Nebraska-Lincoln. Publishing in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, the study's authors have reported the first evidence that a predator's consumption of prey can catalyze the natural rise and fall of chlorovirus populations. The findings represent a potential "game-changer" in the study of virology, the authors said, by suggesting that the food webs in an ecosystem could profoundly affect the rate and magnitude of viral replication. Chloroviruses replicate by infecting green algae that normally live inside a species of single-cell paramecium. The algae and paramecia enjoy a mutually beneficial relationship: Algae supply the paramecia with food as the paramecia provide transportation and protection from the chloroviruses. Meanwhile, chloroviruses stay close by attaching to the surface of paramecia and awaiting an opportunity to infect the algae. But virologists had yet to answer the question of how a chlorovirus actually gains access to its target, which remains safe while encased in the paramecia. The answer appears to lie with a group of millimeter-long crustaceans known as copepods. Researchers have long known that the transparent, one-eyed crustaceans feed on paramecia. But the Nebraska team showed that the crustaceans only partially digest the paramecia, breaking them down just enough to expose the still-living algae before excreting them into the water. No longer protected by the now-ruptured paramecia, the green algae quickly fall victim to the chlorovirus. The crustaceans thus act as a catalyst for viral infection and replication, the authors said. "We don't know anybody who's ever seen anything quite like it," said chlorovirus discoverer James Van Etten, the university's William Allington Distinguished Professor of Plant Pathology. "This is the first example, as far as we know, where a predator is actually releasing the host for a virus." The researchers came to the conclusion by dropping concentrations of the chlorovirus and algae-housing paramecia into samples of freshwater. In the absence of a paramecia-chomping copepod, chlorovirus levels barely rose over several days. Yet when the team added just a single copepod, those levels increased nearly 100 times in just 24 hours. That spike approximated the rise in chloroviruses observed when the researchers instead burst the paramecia with sound waves, indicating that this exposure is what causes the virus to bloom. Co-author David Dunigan, research professor of plant pathology, said the finding illustrates how the structure of food webs in an ecosystem may influence viral propagation. "It's potentially a game-changer in virology, because it means that the gut becomes a very special place for virology," Dunigan said. "Generally, virology is taught from the point of view that infection comes from random collisions between the cell of the host (and the virus). In other words, the probability of infection under those conditions is just a function of the concentration of these two things. "What's very different about what we're seeing is that it's independent of concentrations. The outcome -- the genesis of the virus -- is essentially (a result of) how fast the predator eats. If it eats more, you get more virus." The team said this variable may also help explain the cyclical fluctuations of chlorovirus populations, which rise and fall throughout a year. John DeLong, assistant professor of biological sciences, introduced the rate of copepod foraging into a mathematical model designed to predict viral replication rates in natural environments. DeLong found that the model churned out a bloom-and-wither dynamic that generally matched the magnitude and length of chlorovirus cycles observed in freshwater lakes. "When a predator eats a lot of prey, the prey crash, and then the predators crash," DeLong said. "Then, when the prey are free of predators, they grow again, and then the predators come back. If that's true, and the foraging rate is the thing that gives us viruses, the point in the cycle that has the greatest foraging rate is when we should see the biggest spikes in viruses. "So we just basically piggybacked virus production onto the normal predator-prey cycle that would come out of this system, and sure enough, it produces peaks in the viruses. It also comes fairly close to the kinds of observations (we've seen). As a modeler, that tells me that this is at least a viable explanation for cycles of viruses in nature." And given the large number of known symbiotic relationships between host organisms and those living within them, this viral dynamic may well be playing out in diverse ecosystems across the planet, Van Etten said. "We suspect that, if people look, they're going to find similar (interactions)," said Van Etten, who co-directs the Nebraska Center for Virology. "In fact, we have suggested that coral reefs might be one possibility ... where something like this could take place. There are certainly places to look." The team previously collaborated with Johns Hopkins University, the University of Nebraska Medical Center and Nebraska Wesleyan University to show that a chlorovirus causes cognitive impairments in mice and may be able to replicate in some animal cells.


News Article | November 10, 2016
Site: www.eurekalert.org

The transparent belly of a tiny beast has revealed how algae-infecting chloroviruses bloom in freshwater around the world, says a new study from the University of Nebraska-Lincoln. Publishing in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, the study's authors have reported the first evidence that a predator's consumption of prey can catalyze the natural rise and fall of chlorovirus populations. The findings represent a potential "game-changer" in the study of virology, the authors said, by suggesting that the food webs in an ecosystem could profoundly affect the rate and magnitude of viral replication. Chloroviruses replicate by infecting green algae that normally live inside a species of single-cell paramecium. The algae and paramecia enjoy a mutually beneficial relationship: Algae supply the paramecia with food as the paramecia provide transportation and protection from the chloroviruses. Meanwhile, chloroviruses stay close by attaching to the surface of paramecia and awaiting an opportunity to infect the algae. But virologists had yet to answer the question of how a chlorovirus actually gains access to its target, which remains safe while encased in the paramecia. The answer appears to lie with a group of millimeter-long crustaceans known as copepods. Researchers have long known that the transparent, one-eyed crustaceans feed on paramecia. But the Nebraska team showed that the crustaceans only partially digest the paramecia, breaking them down just enough to expose the still-living algae before excreting them into the water. No longer protected by the now-ruptured paramecia, the green algae quickly fall victim to the chlorovirus. The crustaceans thus act as a catalyst for viral infection and replication, the authors said. "We don't know anybody who's ever seen anything quite like it," said chlorovirus discoverer James Van Etten, the university's William Allington Distinguished Professor of Plant Pathology. "This is the first example, as far as we know, where a predator is actually releasing the host for a virus." The researchers came to the conclusion by dropping concentrations of the chlorovirus and algae-housing paramecia into samples of freshwater. In the absence of a paramecia-chomping copepod, chlorovirus levels barely rose over several days. Yet when the team added just a single copepod, those levels increased nearly 100 times in just 24 hours. That spike approximated the rise in chloroviruses observed when the researchers instead burst the paramecia with sound waves, indicating that this exposure is what causes the virus to bloom. Co-author David Dunigan, research professor of plant pathology, said the finding illustrates how the structure of food webs in an ecosystem may influence viral propagation. "It's potentially a game-changer in virology, because it means that the gut becomes a very special place for virology," Dunigan said. "Generally, virology is taught from the point of view that infection comes from random collisions between the cell of the host (and the virus). In other words, the probability of infection under those conditions is just a function of the concentration of these two things. "What's very different about what we're seeing is that it's independent of concentrations. The outcome - the genesis of the virus - is essentially (a result of) how fast the predator eats. If it eats more, you get more virus." The team said this variable may also help explain the cyclical fluctuations of chlorovirus populations, which rise and fall throughout a year. John DeLong, assistant professor of biological sciences, introduced the rate of copepod foraging into a mathematical model designed to predict viral replication rates in natural environments. DeLong found that the model churned out a bloom-and-wither dynamic that generally matched the magnitude and length of chlorovirus cycles observed in freshwater lakes. "When a predator eats a lot of prey, the prey crash, and then the predators crash," DeLong said. "Then, when the prey are free of predators, they grow again, and then the predators come back. If that's true, and the foraging rate is the thing that gives us viruses, the point in the cycle that has the greatest foraging rate is when we should see the biggest spikes in viruses. "So we just basically piggybacked virus production onto the normal predator-prey cycle that would come out of this system, and sure enough, it produces peaks in the viruses. It also comes fairly close to the kinds of observations (we've seen). As a modeler, that tells me that this is at least a viable explanation for cycles of viruses in nature." And given the large number of known symbiotic relationships between host organisms and those living within them, this viral dynamic may well be playing out in diverse ecosystems across the planet, Van Etten said. "We suspect that, if people look, they're going to find similar (interactions)," said Van Etten, who co-directs the Nebraska Center for Virology. "In fact, we have suggested that coral reefs might be one possibility ... where something like this could take place. There are certainly places to look." The team previously collaborated with Johns Hopkins University, the University of Nebraska Medical Center and Nebraska Wesleyan University to show that a chlorovirus causes cognitive impairments in mice and may be able to replicate in some animal cells. DeLong, Dunigan and Van Etten authored the new study with Zeina Al-Ameeli, doctoral student in natural resource sciences, and Garry Duncan of Nebraska Wesleyan University. The authors received support from the National Science Foundation, the National Institutes of Health and the Stanley Medical Research Institute.


News Article | November 10, 2016
Site: phys.org

Publishing in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, the study's authors have reported the first evidence that a predator's consumption of prey can catalyze the natural rise and fall of chlorovirus populations. The findings represent a potential "game-changer" in the study of virology, the authors said, by suggesting that the food webs in an ecosystem could profoundly affect the rate and magnitude of viral replication. Chloroviruses replicate by infecting green algae that normally live inside a species of single-cell paramecium. The algae and paramecia enjoy a mutually beneficial relationship: Algae supply the paramecia with food as the paramecia provide transportation and protection from the chloroviruses. Meanwhile, chloroviruses stay close by attaching to the surface of paramecia and awaiting an opportunity to infect the algae. But virologists had yet to answer the question of how a chlorovirus actually gains access to its target, which remains safe while encased in the paramecia. The answer appears to lie with a group of millimeter-long crustaceans known as copepods. Researchers have long known that the transparent, one-eyed crustaceans feed on paramecia. But the Nebraska team showed that the crustaceans only partially digest the paramecia, breaking them down just enough to expose the still-living algae before excreting them into the water. No longer protected by the now-ruptured paramecia, the green algae quickly fall victim to the chlorovirus. The crustaceans thus act as a catalyst for viral infection and replication, the authors said. "We don't know anybody who's ever seen anything quite like it," said chlorovirus discoverer James Van Etten, the university's William Allington Distinguished Professor of Plant Pathology. "This is the first example, as far as we know, where a predator is actually releasing the host for a virus." The researchers came to the conclusion by dropping concentrations of the chlorovirus and algae-housing paramecia into samples of freshwater. In the absence of a paramecia-chomping copepod, chlorovirus levels barely rose over several days. Yet when the team added just a single copepod, those levels increased nearly 100 times in just 24 hours. That spike approximated the rise in chloroviruses observed when the researchers instead burst the paramecia with sound waves, indicating that this exposure is what causes the virus to bloom. Co-author David Dunigan, research professor of plant pathology, said the finding illustrates how the structure of food webs in an ecosystem may influence viral propagation. "It's potentially a game-changer in virology, because it means that the gut becomes a very special place for virology," Dunigan said. "Generally, virology is taught from the point of view that infection comes from random collisions between the cell of the host (and the virus). In other words, the probability of infection under those conditions is just a function of the concentration of these two things. "What's very different about what we're seeing is that it's independent of concentrations. The outcome - the genesis of the virus - is essentially (a result of) how fast the predator eats. If it eats more, you get more virus." The team said this variable may also help explain the cyclical fluctuations of chlorovirus populations, which rise and fall throughout a year. John DeLong, assistant professor of biological sciences, introduced the rate of copepod foraging into a mathematical model designed to predict viral replication rates in natural environments. DeLong found that the model churned out a bloom-and-wither dynamic that generally matched the magnitude and length of chlorovirus cycles observed in freshwater lakes. "When a predator eats a lot of prey, the prey crash, and then the predators crash," DeLong said. "Then, when the prey are free of predators, they grow again, and then the predators come back. If that's true, and the foraging rate is the thing that gives us viruses, the point in the cycle that has the greatest foraging rate is when we should see the biggest spikes in viruses. "So we just basically piggybacked virus production onto the normal predator-prey cycle that would come out of this system, and sure enough, it produces peaks in the viruses. It also comes fairly close to the kinds of observations (we've seen). As a modeler, that tells me that this is at least a viable explanation for cycles of viruses in nature." And given the large number of known symbiotic relationships between host organisms and those living within them, this viral dynamic may well be playing out in diverse ecosystems across the planet, Van Etten said. "We suspect that, if people look, they're going to find similar (interactions)," said Van Etten, who co-directs the Nebraska Center for Virology. "In fact, we have suggested that coral reefs might be one possibility ... where something like this could take place. There are certainly places to look." The team previously collaborated with Johns Hopkins University, the University of Nebraska Medical Center and Nebraska Wesleyan University to show that a chlorovirus causes cognitive impairments in mice and may be able to replicate in some animal cells. More information: Predators catalyze an increase in chloroviruses by foraging on the symbiotic hosts of zoochlorellae, Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, www.pnas.org/cgi/doi/10.1073/pnas.1613843113


Werth M.T.,Nebraska Wesleyan University | Halouska S.,University of Nebraska - Lincoln | Shortridge M.D.,University of Nebraska - Lincoln | Zhang B.,University of Nebraska - Lincoln | Powers R.,University of Nebraska - Lincoln
Analytical Biochemistry | Year: 2010

Large amounts of data from high-throughput metabolomic experiments are commonly visualized using a principal component analysis (PCA) two-dimensional scores plot. The question of the similarity or difference between multiple metabolic states then becomes a question of the degree of overlap between their respective data point clusters in principal component (PC) scores space. A qualitative visual inspection of the clustering pattern in PCA scores plots is a common protocol. This article describes the application of tree diagrams and bootstrapping techniques for an improved quantitative analysis of metabolic PCA data clustering. Our PCAtoTree program creates a distance matrix with 100 bootstrap steps that describes the separation of all clusters in a metabolic data set. Using accepted phylogenetic software, the distance matrix resulting from the various metabolic states is organized into a phylogenetic-like tree format, where bootstrap values ≥50 indicate a statistically relevant branch separation. PCAtoTree analysis of two previously published data sets demonstrates the improved resolution of metabolic state differences using tree diagrams. In addition, for metabolomic studies of large numbers of different metabolic states, the tree format provides a better description of similarities and differences between each metabolic state. The approach is also tolerant of sample size variations between different metabolic states. © 2009 Elsevier Inc.


Stern S.A.,Southwest Research Institute | Cunningham N.J.,Nebraska Wesleyan University | Hain M.J.,Nebraska Wesleyan University | Spencer J.R.,Southwest Research Institute | Shinn A.,Southwest Research Institute
Astronomical Journal | Year: 2012

We have observed the mid-UV spectra of both Pluto and its large satellite, Charon, at two rotational epochs using the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) Cosmic Origins Spectrograph (COS) in 2010. These are the first HST/COS measurements of Pluto and Charon. Here we describe the observations and our reduction of them, and present the albedo spectra, average mid-UV albedos, and albedo slopes we derive from these data. These data reveal evidence for a strong absorption feature in the mid-UV spectrum of Pluto; evidence for temporal change in Pluto's spectrum since the 1990s is reported, and indirect evidence for a near-UV spectral absorption on Charon is also reported.


Tietze S.M.,Nebraska Wesleyan University | Gerald G.W.,Nebraska Wesleyan University
Journal of Fish Biology | Year: 2016

Salinity preference and responses to predatory chemical cues were examined both separately and simultaneously in freshwater (FW) and saltwater (SW)-acclimated sailfin mollies Poecilia latipinna, a euryhaline species. It was hypothesized that P. latipinna would prefer FW over SW, move away from chemical cues from a crayfish predator, and favour predator avoidance over osmoregulation when presented with both demands. Both FW and SW-acclimated P. latipinna preferred FW and actively avoided predator cues. When presented with FW plus predator cues v. SW with no cues, P. latipinna were more often found in FW plus predator cues. These results raise questions pertaining to the potential osmoregulatory stress of salinity transitions in euryhaline fishes relative to the potential fitness benefits and whether euryhalinity is utilized for predator avoidance. This study sheds light on the potential benefits and consequences of being salt tolerant or intolerant and complicates the understanding of the selection pressures that have favoured the different osmoregulatory mechanisms among fishes. © 2016 The Fisheries Society of the British Isles.


Grant
Agency: NSF | Branch: Standard Grant | Program: | Phase: S-STEM:SCHLR SCI TECH ENG&MATH | Award Amount: 649.86K | Year: 2017

The Nebraska Wesleyan University (NWU) Departments of Biology, Chemistry, Mathematics and Physics will recruit 14 new students who are both academically talented and have unmet financial need to pursue majors in these disciplines. The program will provide them with scholarships, and academic and social support, including orientation, Archway Seminar, faculty advising and mentoring, tutoring and Supplemental Instruction, career exploration, internships, research projects, cohort housing, and retreat and regular cohort meetings, to enable them to graduate in four years and successfully pursue either graduate education or a career in a STEM field. The project will simultaneously develop a deeper understanding and increased knowledge of the factors that affect the recruitment, retention, graduation, and post-graduation success of talented low-income students entering STEM disciplines, often from small rural schools.

The project includes an in-depth examination of current institutional practices to address the following research questions: 1) How can STEM faculty adjust curricular and pedagogical norms to foster self-efficacy and the development of a science identity in students? 2) From a student perspective, what experiences influence persistence and success in STEM education? The study will contribute to the knowledge regarding the connections between validation, self-efficacy, science identity and culturally responsive pedagogy, and STEM persistence and success, especially in regards to undergraduate students from low-income backgrounds. The results of this inquiry shared with the STEM education community via publications, presentations at professional meetings and conferences, and via the project website and related media. The projects expected impact also includes strengthening recruitment channels that will steer academically talented, financially needy students from many remote rural high schools to STEM careers; spurring economic growth by building a larger, better-prepared STEM workforce for area employers; and strengthening engagement with businesses and professional alumni.

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