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News Article | November 30, 2016
Site: www.acnnewswire.com

Elite Speakers to Share Insights on Global Economy at Asian Financial Forum 2017 in January World-renowned economist and keynote speaker at the Asian Financial Forum 2017 (AFF), Dr Raghuram Rajan commented on the outlook for the United States economy under the next administration of President-elect Donald Trump, ahead of the AFF to be held in Hong Kong on 16 and 17 January. "In the short term, under Trump's new administration, the impact on the US economy looks positive. The combination of infrastructure spending as well as tax cuts would effectively take the burden off the US Federal Reserve to continue stimulating the economy," said Dr Rajan, who served as Governor of the Reserve Bank of India between September 2013 and September 2016. "The resulting market conditions would enable the Fed to raise interest rates by 25 basis points in December and adopt a faster pace of rate normalisation than would have been envisaged without a Trump presidency." Regarding international trade implications of campaign promises made by Mr Trump, Dr Rajan said the Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP) is likely to be simply "left on the shelf". However, he said he hopes an immediate trade war with the Chinese mainland or Mexico does not materialise, and the Trump administration settles for more measured steps on carrying out its election promises. "We are likely to have a more inwardly-focused US, which gives more space to some other countries, especially China, to play a leadership role," said Dr Rajan. And as the mainland is moving towards a service-oriented economy, he agrees that Hong Kong can play the role of a "super-connector" by offering world-class legal, arbitration and financial services, trained personnel, and soft infrastructure to meet the needs of mainland companies. Dr Rajan is a Distinguished Service Professor of Finance at the University of Chicago Booth School of Business. He was the 23rd Governor of the Reserve Bank of India between September 2013 and September 2016. Between 2003 and 2006, Dr Rajan was the Chief Economist and Director of Research at the International Monetary Fund. He will give a keynote speech on the second day of AFF 2017, organised by the Hong Kong Special Administrative Region (HKSAR) Government and the Hong Kong Trade Development Council (HKTDC). The 10th edition of AFF will be held at the Hong Kong Convention and Exhibition Centre on 16 and 17 January, 2017. Under the theme of "Asia: Driving Change, Innovation and Connectivity", the AFF will examine the region's evolving opportunities and challenges as well as their implications for global growth. Another keynote speaker, Dr Mohamed A El-Erian also spoke about the outlook for the global economy ahead of the AFF. "2017 will see the global economy get closer to an inflection point - one that sees greater uncertainty about its ability to sustain low and stable growth, coupled with repressed financial stability; and one that sees it get a lot closer to a tipping point that either leads to higher growth and genuine financial stability, or one that is characterised by periodic recessions and unsettling financial instability," said Dr A El-Erian, Chief Economic Advisor at Allianz. "The deciding factor will be the extent to which politicians in the advanced world are able to deliver a much needed policy pivot: from excessive reliance on central banks' unconventional measures and towards a more comprehensive policy response that engages the full range of economic tools to deal with the structural and cyclical headwinds facing high inclusive growth and genuine financial stability." Mohamed A El-Erian is the Chief Economic Advisor at Allianz, the corporate parent of PIMCO where he served as CEO and co-CIO (2007-14). He chairs President Obama's Global Development Council, and is a Bloomberg View columnist and a contributing editor at the Financial Times. He has published widely on international economic and finance topics. His 2008 book, When Markets Collide, was a New York Times and Wall Street Journal bestseller, won the Financial Times/Goldman Sachs Business Book of the Year and was named a book of the year by The Economist and one of the best business books of all time by the Independent (UK). His second book, The Only Game in Town, is also a bestseller. He is currently a board member of the NBER, the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace, and Cambridge in America. The two prominent speakers will share their views on the outlook for the world economy as well as different issues such as the rise of populism in different countries and its implications, trade and competition, risks for emerging markets, China's growth, monetary policies and interest rates at the AFF Keynote Luncheons on 16 and 17 January 2017 respectively. Extended speaker line-up The line-up of financial and business leaders speaking at the AFF 2017 also includes: - Mirza Adityaswara, Senior Deputy Governor, Bank Indonesia - Raymond L Conner, Vice Chairman, The Boeing Company - Stephen P Groff, Vice-President for East Asia, Southeast Asia and the Pacific, Asian Development Bank - Paul Gruenwald, Managing Director and Chief Economist, Asia Pacific, S&P Global Ratings - Christian Noyer, Honorary Governor, Banque de France - Klaus Regling, Managing Director, European Stability Mechanism - Andrew Sheng, Distinguished Fellow, Asia Global Institute, The University of Hong Kong - Makoto Shibata, Head of Global Innovation Team, Digital Innovation Division, The Bank of Tokyo-Mitsubishi UFJ, Ltd - Stephen 'Kai' Sui, Chief Executive Officer, Neural Technologies Limited - Ravi Suri, Global Head - Project and Export Finance, Standard Chartered - Norihiro Takahashi, President, Government Pension Investment Fund, Japan - Chairul Tanjung, Founder and Chairman, CT Corp - Tao Zhang, Deputy Managing Director, International Monetary Fund - Jaime Augusto Zobel de Ayala, Chairman and Chief Executive Officer, Ayala Corporation 10th edition of AFF: The voice in global finance Launched in 2007, the AFF is regarded as the premier annual event in Asia for global finance professionals. The upcoming forum will be its 10th edition. Previous editions welcomed high-level speakers including US Treasury Secretaries Timothy Geithner and Larry Summers, Nobel Prize-winning economist and New York Times Columnist Paul Krugman and Dr Ben S. Bernanke, former Chairman of the Board of Governors of the United States Federal Reserve System. Event Website: http://www.asianfinancialforum.com/ Interview with Dr Raghuram Rajan - podcast link: http://www.hktdc.com/info/podcast/v/en/en/1X04CU5D Photo download: http://bit.ly/2gF0pIx Media Registration: Media may register for AFF 2017 on-site with their business cards and/or media identification. To view press releases in Chinese, please visit http://mediaroom.hktdc.com/tc About HKTDC Established in 1966, the Hong Kong Trade Development Council (HKTDC) is a statutory body dedicated to creating opportunities for Hong Kong's businesses. With more than 40 offices globally, including 13 on the Chinese mainland, the HKTDC promotes Hong Kong as a platform for doing business with China, Asia and the world. With 50 years of experience, the HKTDC organises international exhibitions, conferences and business missions to provide companies, particularly SMEs, with business opportunities on the mainland and in international markets, while providing information via trade publications, research reports and digital channels including the media room. For more information, please visit: www.hktdc.com/aboutus. Follow us on Google+, Twitter @hktdc, LinkedIn. Google+: https://plus.google.com/+hktdc Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/hktdc LinkedIn: http://www.linkedin.com/company/hong-kong-trade-development-council Contact:


News Article | November 17, 2016
Site: www.eurekalert.org

AUSTIN, Texas -- An economist at The University of Texas at Austin will brief members of Congress on how insurers are using high out-of-pocket prescription drug costs to deter certain chronically ill patients from joining their plans in the individual markets. Michael Geruso, an assistant professor of economics, will share his views during a panel discussion at 2 p.m. Thursday at the U.S. Capitol. The discussion, hosted by the Coalition for Accessible Treatments, will help inform continuing efforts in health care reform. Geruso will report findings from his National Bureau of Economic Research (NBER) working paper released this week, which shows that despite the Affordable Care Act's popular provisions to protect consumers with pre-existing conditions from high health care costs, some consumers -- including those with conditions such as multiple sclerosis (MS), rheumatoid arthritis and certain cancers -- continue to face discrimination that results in thousands of dollars in out-of-pocket costs. President-elect Donald Trump and the Republican Congress have indicated their intention to keep the ACA's protections for pre-existing conditions. "Any future scenario in which there is a goal of guaranteeing coverage for people with pre-existing conditions will face similar challenges," said Geruso, a faculty research associate in the university's Population Research Center. In the study, Geruso and Harvard University researchers Timothy Layton and Daniel Prinz examined how ACA Exchange plans might use formulary benefit design -- the arrangement of prescription drug coverage into various cost-sharing tiers -- to screen out unprofitable patients by offering poor coverage for certain medications. The core problem, Geruso said, is with risk adjustment and reinsurance -- the regulatory mechanisms that compensate insurers for taking on a high-cost patient. For some expensive patients, the risk adjustment and reinsurance payments are too low to allow insurers to break even. "If we observe insurers avoiding certain patient types, it means that risk adjustment and reinsurance do not adequately compensate the plan for enrolling such patients," Geruso said. "Understanding how this type of backdoor -- which has featured prominently in the theory of adverse selection -- functions in practice is critical to the continued reform of the managed-competition health insurance markets." The researchers found that although risk adjustment and reinsurance subsidize costs and "neutralize selection incentives" for the majority of drug classes, some patients remain predictably unprofitable. Among the most unprofitable patients are those prescribed drugs in the Biological Response Modifiers class -- such as Copaxone, a drug used to treat and prevent relapse of MS -- who generate an average of $61,000 in claims but $47,000 in revenue after accounting for the large risk adjustment and reinsurance transfer payments. The researchers said this creates a large incentive for a firm to avoid covering this patient, and while ACA Exchange plans are required to cover at least one drug in each therapeutic category and class, there is no requirement on how the drugs should be tiered within a formulary. That incentivizes insurers to place such drugs on specialty tiers, where patients face high out-of-pocket costs. The study showed that for the few therapeutic classes of drugs with the strongest insurer incentives to avoid the corresponding patients, drugs were 50 percent more likely to be placed on a specialty tier, relative to the same drugs in employer plans, where the patient avoidance incentives do not exist. This design could lead to out-of-pocket consumer costs exceeding $1,000 per month for some drugs in a typical Exchange Silver plan, researchers said. "While the current regulatory framework goes a long way toward weakening insurer incentives to avoid unhealthy enrollees, some patients still imply large insurer losses, and insurers recognize that the benefit design can act as a screening mechanism," Geruso said. "The bottom line for consumers is exposure to high out-of-pocket costs and a system in which no plan will offer good coverage for certain illnesses."


News Article | November 18, 2016
Site: www.sciencedaily.com

An economist at The University of Texas at Austin will brief members of Congress on how insurers are using high out-of-pocket prescription drug costs to deter certain chronically ill patients from joining their plans in the individual markets. Michael Geruso, an assistant professor of economics, will share his views during a panel discussion at 2 p.m. Thursday at the U.S. Capitol. The discussion, hosted by the Coalition for Accessible Treatments, will help inform continuing efforts in health care reform. Geruso will report findings from his National Bureau of Economic Research (NBER) working paper released this week, which shows that despite the Affordable Care Act's popular provisions to protect consumers with pre-existing conditions from high health care costs, some consumers -- including those with conditions such as multiple sclerosis (MS), rheumatoid arthritis and certain cancers -- continue to face discrimination that results in thousands of dollars in out-of-pocket costs. President-elect Donald Trump and the Republican Congress have indicated their intention to keep the ACA's protections for pre-existing conditions. "Any future scenario in which there is a goal of guaranteeing coverage for people with pre-existing conditions will face similar challenges," said Geruso, a faculty research associate in the university's Population Research Center. In the study, Geruso and Harvard University researchers Timothy Layton and Daniel Prinz examined how ACA Exchange plans might use formulary benefit design -- the arrangement of prescription drug coverage into various cost-sharing tiers -- to screen out unprofitable patients by offering poor coverage for certain medications. The core problem, Geruso said, is with risk adjustment and reinsurance -- the regulatory mechanisms that compensate insurers for taking on a high-cost patient. For some expensive patients, the risk adjustment and reinsurance payments are too low to allow insurers to break even. "If we observe insurers avoiding certain patient types, it means that risk adjustment and reinsurance do not adequately compensate the plan for enrolling such patients," Geruso said. "Understanding how this type of backdoor -- which has featured prominently in the theory of adverse selection -- functions in practice is critical to the continued reform of the managed-competition health insurance markets." The researchers found that although risk adjustment and reinsurance subsidize costs and "neutralize selection incentives" for the majority of drug classes, some patients remain predictably unprofitable. Among the most unprofitable patients are those prescribed drugs in the Biological Response Modifiers class -- such as Copaxone, a drug used to treat and prevent relapse of MS -- who generate an average of $61,000 in claims but $47,000 in revenue after accounting for the large risk adjustment and reinsurance transfer payments. The researchers said this creates a large incentive for a firm to avoid covering this patient, and while ACA Exchange plans are required to cover at least one drug in each therapeutic category and class, there is no requirement on how the drugs should be tiered within a formulary. That incentivizes insurers to place such drugs on specialty tiers, where patients face high out-of-pocket costs. The study showed that for the few therapeutic classes of drugs with the strongest insurer incentives to avoid the corresponding patients, drugs were 50 percent more likely to be placed on a specialty tier, relative to the same drugs in employer plans, where the patient avoidance incentives do not exist. This design could lead to out-of-pocket consumer costs exceeding $1,000 per month for some drugs in a typical Exchange Silver plan, researchers said. "While the current regulatory framework goes a long way toward weakening insurer incentives to avoid unhealthy enrollees, some patients still imply large insurer losses, and insurers recognize that the benefit design can act as a screening mechanism," Geruso said. "The bottom line for consumers is exposure to high out-of-pocket costs and a system in which no plan will offer good coverage for certain illnesses."


News Article | October 31, 2016
Site: motherboard.vice.com

A recent study by the National Bureau of Economic Research (NBER), a nonprofit research group focused on public policy and business matters, found that passengers with "African-American sounding names" were more than twice as likely than those with "white sounding names" to have their ride canceled by Uber drivers. Those same riders also had to wait 35 percent longer than passengers with "white sounding names" for rides from Lyft. (The difference between "white sounding" and "African-American sounding names" for the purposes of this study was taken from a 2004 paper by other researchers, which cited "names such as DeShawn, Tyrone, Reginald, Shanice, Precious, Kiara, and Deja" as examples of black names.) When it came to gender, the NBER report—which was co-authored by researchers at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Stanford, and the University of Washington—found that women were often taken on longer, more expensive routes, than necessary when riding with Uber. It should be noted that it's not just app-based ridesharing services that have these problems: previous research and anecdotal evidence has shown discrimination by taxicab drivers against riders based on race and sex. For this new study, researchers chronicled 1,500 Uber and Lyft cab rides over a two-year-period in cities on both coasts: Seattle, Washington and Boston, Massachusetts. In Seattle, they found that African-American passengers were forced to wait 35 percent longer than white passengers when hailing a Lyft or Uber cab. In Boston, riders hailing Ubers with African-American sounding names were more than twice as likely to have their trip canceled than if they requested a ride with a white sounding name, despite the fact that Uber penalizes drivers for canceling trips too often. Worse still, these passengers were more than three times likelier than white riders to have their trip nixed if they were trying to get picked up in a low-density area—just the type of place that suffers from poor public transit and where an Uber or Lyft is extremely helpful to get around. It should be noted that Uber cabbies don't see the name of the passenger until they've accepted the fare, which is why they have to cancel the ride if they choose not to pick the person up. Lyft drivers, on the other hand, do see the name and sometimes even a profile photo of the person hailing a ride, before they accept the fare. So while Lyft drivers canceled rides far less often than Uber drivers, it's possible they were screening out African-American passengers before they even accepted fares. Women also endured discrimination at the hands of cab drivers, albeit in a different way. In Boston, female passengers picked up by Uber drivers were often taken on much longer drives than needed. One passenger reported being carted onto the freeway for multiple exits, when her stop was a mere mile away. Not only did these women have to shell out more cash for what should've been a short trip, but they were often forced to listen to chatterbox drivers—uncomfortably so. The researchers described this behavior in the paper as a "combination of profiteering and flirting to a captive audience." Uber, which has a less than stellar reputation on matters of discrimination against the disabled, treatment of its employees, and rider safety, defended itself with the following statement: "Discrimination has no place in society and no place on Uber. We believe Uber is helping reduce transportation inequities across the board." The company did, however, suggest it could improve, also stating "studies like this one are helpful in thinking about how we can do even more." The researchers behind the study noted that fixes to systemic problems of discrimination won't be easy, not even with the "move fast" ethos espoused by Silicon Valley companies. Taking out passengers' names from trip bookings, however, could remedy the immediate problem. The trick with this solution, however, is that it could end up confusing the driver and messing with pickups. Overall, the study counters one of the big selling points of app-based ride-hailing services—namely, that people can get rides on demand no matter the color of their skin or their appearance. Get six of our favorite Motherboard stories every day by signing up for our newsletter.


Borenstein S.,University of California at Berkeley | Kellogg R.,NBER | Kellogg R.,University of Michigan
Energy Journal | Year: 2014

Beginning in early 2011, crude oil production in the U.S. Midwest and Canada surpassed the pipeline capacity to transport it to the Gulf Coast where it could access the world oil market. As a result, the U.S. ́ benchmarḱ crude oil price in Cushing, Oklahoma, declined substantially relative to internationally traded oil. In this paper, we study how this development affected prices for refined products, focusing on the markets for motor gasoline and diesel. We find that the relative decrease in Midwest crude oil prices did not pass through to wholesale gasoline and diesel prices. This result is consistent with evidence that the marginal gallon of fuel in the Midwest is still imported from coastal locations. Our findings imply that investments in new pipeline infrastructure between the Midwest and the Gulf Coast, such as the southern segment of the controversial Keystone XL pipeline, will not raise gasoline prices in the Midwest. Copyright © 2014 by the IAEE. All rights reserved.


News Article | November 22, 2016
Site: www.eurekalert.org

After decades of progress, earnings gap between black and white men is back at 1950 levels DURHAM, N.C. -- After years of progress, the median earnings gap between black and white men has returned to what it was in 1950, according to new research by economists from Duke University and the University of Chicago. The experience of African-American men is not uniform, though: The earnings gap between black men with a college education and those with less education is at an all-time high, the authors say. The research appears online in the National Bureau of Economic Research working paper series. The paper looks at earnings for working-age men across a span of 75 years, from 1940 to 2014. The earnings gap between black and white men narrowed during the civil rights era. Then, starting around 1970, the gap between black and white men's wages started widening once again. "When it comes to the earnings gap between black and white men, we've gone all the way back to 1950," said Duke economist Patrick Bayer, who co-authored the paper with Kerwin Kofi Charles of the University of Chicago. The picture for black men looks very different at the top of the economic ladder versus the bottom, the authors say. Since the 1960s, top black salaries have continued to climb. Those advances were fueled by more equal access to universities and high-skilled professions, the study finds. Meanwhile, a starkly different story transpired at the bottom of the economic ladder. Massive increases in incarceration rates and the general decline of working-class jobs have devastated the labor market prospects of men with a high school degree or less, the authors say. The changing economy has been hard on all workers with less than a high school education, but especially devastating for black men, Bayer said. "The broad economic changes we've seen since the 1970s have clearly helped people at the top of the ladder," Bayer said. "But the labor market for low-skilled workers has basically collapsed. "Back in 1940 there were plenty of jobs for men with less than a high school degree. Now education is more and more a determinant of who's working and who's not." In fact, more and more working-age men in the United States aren't working at all. The number of nonworking white men grew from about 8 percent in 1960 to 17 percent in 2014. The numbers look still worse among black men: In 1960, 19 percent of black men were not working; in 2014, that number had grown to 35 percent of black men. That includes men who are incarcerated as well those who can't find jobs. "The rate at which men are not working has been skyrocketing, and it's not simply the result of the Great Recession," Bayer said. "It's a big part of what's been happening to our economy over the past 40 years." The situation would be even worse if not for educational gains among African-Americans over the past 75 years, Bayer said. On average, black men today have many more years of schooling than black men of the past, and the education gap between white and black men has shrunk considerably. Nevertheless, a gap remains: These days, black men have about a year's less education than white men, on average. "In essence, the economic benefits that should have come from the substantial gains in education for black men over the past 75 years have been completely undone by the changing economy, which exacts an ever steeper price for the differences that still remain," Bayer said. The findings show the need for renewed focus on closing racial gaps in education and school quality, which have been stuck in place for several decades, according to the authors. They also suggest that any economic changes that improve prospects for all low-skilled workers will have the important side effect of reducing racial economic inequality. "We clearly need to create better job opportunities for everyone in the lower rungs of the economic ladder, where work has become increasingly hard to come by," Bayer said. CITATION: "Divergent Paths: Structural Change, Economic Rank, and the Evolution of Black-White Earnings Differences, 1940-2014," Patrick Bayer and Kerwin Kofi Charles. NBER Working Paper No. 2279, November 2016.


News Article | December 21, 2015
Site: www.washingtonpost.com

In a paper published by the National Bureau for Economic Research, two researchers say they have found a startling connection between exposure to outdoor pollution and an increase in violent crime. The study, released last week, presents “the first quasi-experimental evidence that air pollution affects violent criminal activity,” the researchers say. The authors are Evan Herrnstadt of Harvard’s Center for the Environment and Erich Muehlegger of the University of California, Davis. They drew on a vast crime dataset from the Chicago Police Department — more than 2 million major crimes committed between 2001 and 2012 in the city. The data included the crimes’ dates and locations, and researchers were able to figure out how close they were to major interstates that cross the city of Chicago, like I-290, which runs west and east. Finally, they had meteorological data, and thus could know when winds were blowing tailpipe pollution from vehicles into neighborhoods south of I-290, or into neighborhoods north of it (to give one example). The study design gets around a large problem that occurs if you simply try to correlate pollution with the occurrence of crime in a given location — namely, there are many counfounding factors such as income, Herrnstadt explains. By contrast, the study design of comparing neighborhoods with themselves, on days when they are and aren’t downwind, “allows us to drill down and really identify this causal effect of pollution on crime,” he says. Through this method, the authors report, they find an estimated 2.2 percent higher prevalence of violent crime when a neighborhood is on “the downwind side” of these major roads or interstates. However, there was no effect on property crimes. The researchers say they cannot distinguish which car-related pollutants – such as carbon monoxide or nitrogen oxides – are actually responsible for the effect. The authors also calculate that the economic cost of the crime caused by automotive pollution in this way could be $ 100 million to $ 200 million per year. It isn’t clear precisely how the pollution would be affecting people in a way that promotes criminal behavior — especially violent criminal behavior — but the authors list a number of possibilities, including cognitive impairment and just greater irritation. “We think the mechanism here is that you’re exposed to more pollution, either it’s an irritant, or it affects your impulse control in some other way, and basically results in you crossing lines that you wouldn’t otherwise cross,” says Herrnstadt. That’s why, he says, the data suggest more assault cases escalating into cases of battery in the presence of pollution. The research is part of the NBER’s working paper series and papers in this series “have not undergone the review accorded official NBER publications,” although as Paul Krugman notes, economic journals can be so slow to publish that working papers provide a very good forum for researchers to share their results (which others can then criticize). The result is actually not so surprising when considered in the context of prior research, suggests Josh Graff Zivin, an economist at the University of California-San Diego who commented on the paper at the Post’s request (but was not involved in the research). “There is a body of epidemiologic health literature that shows that pollution at high levels can impair judgement, can increase aggression, can impair cognition,” says Zivin. Indeed, a large body of prior research has tied another environmental factor — warmer temperatures — to crime and violence, and there has also been research suggesting that lead pollution drove a large amount of criminal activity that, once lead was phased out of gasoline, dropped off. There is also a small but growing body of research suggesting that poor indoor air quality can have significant cognitive effects. What’s more surprising about the study, says Zivin, is that “if you think the crime that they see in their paper, violent crimes, if you think that those are in part about impulse control, then this is really novel. As far as I know, we don’t really have evidence that pollution can lead to increased impulsivity.” Another economist familiar with the work, Reed Walker of the University of California-Berkeley, said the researchers did a good job of assuaging his skepticism. “There is an increasingly well developed literature studying the relationship between temperatures and crime, which made me initially somewhat skeptical of the findings in this paper (given the strong correlation between temperature and pollution),” said Walker by email. “However, the authors are careful to control very flexibly for temperature in their primary specifications.” Walker concludes that “this is interesting and important work and, at the very least, begs for more research on the subject.” The new study only looked at one type of air pollution — from vehicles — meaning that if the research is right, it could be the tip of the iceberg. “If we think this extends to all pollution, it could be a lot bigger than this,” Herrnstadt says. The world just adopted a tough new climate goal. Here’s how hard it will be to meet Obama just released the biggest energy efficiency rule in U.S. history Why the Paris agreement could be the beginning of the end for global warming denial For more, you can sign up for our weekly newsletter here, and follow us on Twitter here.


News Article | November 4, 2016
Site: marketersmedia.com

www.pricingnation.com. We believe this more micro based, ground up approach will add value to the home price forecasting space. We intend to publish our Miami forecast on a quarterly basis. A table with the top 5 biggest increases and decreases per zip code can be found below. The Pricing Nation Econometrics Heat Map (also below) visualizes how the average home prices will vary across zip codes in the NYC. Pricing Nation offers free "Home Investment Report Cards" including local demand/supply factors and grades for each home in the current MSAs at www.pricingnation.com. For a limited time PricingNation.com is offering its home level forecast for the next twelve months. "The Home Investment Report" card is designed to be easy to use for all home buyers and sellers. Pricing Nation is currently providing projections for homes in the Boston, Seattle, Miami, Tampa MSAs and NYC and is expanding its offerings to other cities in the near future. For more information about our forecasts, please contact Raj Koganti at raj@pricingnation.com. * Downturn data reported by S&P/Case-Shiller Home Price Indices, and recession data reported by the National Bureau of Economic Research (NBER)


News Article | October 28, 2016
Site: marketersmedia.com

www.pricingnation.com. We believe this more micro based, ground up approach will add value to the home price forecasting space. We intend to publish our Tampa forecast on a quarterly basis. A table with the top 5 biggest increases and decreases per zip code can be found below. The Pricing Nation Econometrics Heat Map (also below) visualizes how the average home prices will vary across zip codes in the Tampa MSA. Pricing Nation offers free "Home Investment Report Cards" including local demand/supply factors and grades for each home in the current MSAs at www.pricingnation.com. For a limited time PricingNation.com is offering its home level forecast for the next twelve months. "The Home Investment Report" card is designed to be easy to use for all home buyers and sellers. Pricing Nation is currently providing projections for homes in the Boston, Seattle, Miami, Tampa MSAs and NYC and is expanding its offerings to other cities in the near future. For more information about our forecasts, please contact Raj Koganti at raj@pricingnation.com. * Downturn data reported by S&P/Case-Shiller Home Price Indices, and recession data reported by the National Bureau of Economic Research (NBER)


-- The Government of Cross River State through the Ministry of Climate Change and Forestry in collaboration with the Africa Clean Energy Summit/Group, the Federal Ministry of Environment, the Federal Ministry of Health, the Federal Ministry of Industry, Trade & Investment, NEPAD Nigeria, Covenant University, ADC Energy USA, Development Partners, Always Green Power & Systems Limited and The Environment Communications Limited is hosting a Global Summit on Climate Change and Green Entrepreneurship in April 2017 to coincide with the World Earth Day Celebrations.The summit will bring together international and national stakeholders from governments, private sector, non-governmental organizations, development partners and international investors, to address matters that would support the state's transition to a low-carbon and climate-resilient economy - building a sustainable green economy in Cross River State.The Cross River State Global Summit on Climate Change and Green Entrepreneurship with focus on Jobs Creation Opportunities and the First Ever Wealth Creation Parks for Low Carbon Development in Africa will hold from April 17th to April 22nd 2017 with a Special Marathon Race for Climate Change - ''Cross River Climate Marathon'' at the CALABAR INTERNATIONAL CONVENTION CENTRE.The global event will include a World Class Summit; the 2017 World Earth Day celebrations;High Level Climate Solutions Segments, an International Exhibition; Technical Conferences;Business Sessions; Investment Forums; Green Energy Empowerment for MSMEs; Green Wealth from Tree PlantingProgram; Green Investment Tours; Carbon Credit Train; Official Solarization of the Cross River State Government House with energy efficient and saving devices as the driving force for promoting clean energy in Nigeria and leading to the establishment of the FIRST EVER GREEN ENERGY EXPORT PROCESSING HUB IN WEST AFRICA FOR SMART CITIES AND COMMUNITIES;the International Green Hall of Fame; Flag-Off of the Distribution of Clean Cookstoves in Cross River State (under the Rebranding Climate Change Clean Cookstoves Initiative); and concurrent activities such as the incorporation of RACE FOR THE CLIMATE – A Special Marathon Race for Climate Change (''Cross River Climate Marathon'' ''with special sport foot wears for recharging mobile phones"), Green Marketplace -"COME SEE AND BUY", a Climate Walk, Green Road Show and Clean Energy Technology & Green Business Solution Hub for Africa.The CROSS RIVER STATE $250M GREEN ENTREPRENEURSHIP FUND:A $250Million Green Entrepreneurship Fund (the first ever in Africa) will be launched on the 22nd of April 2017, as part of the World Earth Day Celebrations. The Fund will empower a minimum of 150,000 Green Entrepreneurs and Enterprises;creating more than 600,000 Direct jobs and over 1,200,000 Indirect Jobs in 18 months. With a population of more than 3.5Million, Cross River State would provide employment for a reasonable number of young people in the state. The $250Million Green Entrepreneurship Fund is the first phase of a $1 Billion Green Entrepreneurship Fund … Green Entrepreneurship for massive empowerment in Nigeria and Africa!CONSEQUENTLY, A NATIONAL BUSINESS AND ENVIRONMENT ROUNDTABLE (NBER) SHALL BE FLAGGED OFF BY THE HONOURABLE MINISTER OF ENVIRONMENT.The Global Climate Summit is programmed to deliver the customized strategic roadmap of climate and green bonds/finance secrets through the following rationale: -•Financial institutions represent the largest source of public of finance for technology for adaptation/mitigation and low carbon sustainable economic development for operationalizing our signed Nationally Determined Contributions(NDCs);•They therefore have the ability and can play a pivotal role to direct capital and demonstrate to markets the opportunities, risks and potential returns of sustainable investments, while at the same time being active actors in policy dialogues to assist in mainstreaming the sustainable development agenda in all sectors.MEDIA FORUM @ THE GLOBAL SUMMIT:More than 40 international and national journalists would be joining decision makers, policymakers, industry leaders, investors, experts and major stakeholders around the world to explore and further understand the challenges and opportunities that arise from Climate Change.The Global Summit on Climate Change and Green Entrepreneurship promises to be the biggest and best of all, in the history of Climate Change and Clean Energy Summits, Conferences and Programmes in Africa.It is worthy to note that Cross River State is the first and only subnational government that has a ministry for Climate Change in Africa. Cross River is also strategically positioned to host global events of this nature as an eco-tourism state.

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