Yokneam, Israel
Yokneam, Israel

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Neustadter D.,Navotek Medical Ltd. | Tune M.,Navotek Medical Ltd. | Zaretsky A.,Technion - Israel Institute of Technology | Shofti R.,Technion - Israel Institute of Technology | And 3 more authors.
International Journal of Radiation Oncology Biology Physics | Year: 2010

Purpose: To analyze the stability, visibility, and histology of a novel implantable soft-tissue marker (nonradioactive and radioactive) implanted in dog prostate and rabbit liver. Methods and Materials: A total of 34 nonradioactive and 35 radioactive markers were implanted in 1 dog and 16 rabbits. Stability was assessed by measuring intermarker distance (IMD) variation relative to IMDs at implantation. The IMDs were measured weekly for 4 months in the dog and biweekly for 2-4 weeks in the rabbits. Ultrasound and X-ray imaging were performed on all subjects. Computed tomography and MRI were performed on the dog. Histologic analysis was performed on the rabbits after 2 or 4 months. Results: A total of 139 measurements had a mean (± SD) absolute IMD variation of 1.1 ± 1.1 mm. These IMD variations are consistent with those reported in the literature as due to random organ deformation. The markers were visible, identifiable, and induced minimal or no image artifacts in all tested imaging modalities. Histologic analysis revealed that all pathologic changes were highly localized and not expected to be clinically significant. Conclusions: The markers were stable from the time of implantation. The markers were found to be compatible with all common medical imaging modalities. The markers caused no significant histologic effects. With respect to marker stability, visibility, and histologic analysis these implanted fiducials are appropriate for soft-tissue target positioning in radiotherapy. © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.


De Kruijf W.J.M.,Institute Verbeeten | Verstraete J.,University Hospitals Leuven | Neustadter D.,Navotek Medical Ltd | Corn B.W.,Tel Aviv Medical Center | And 9 more authors.
International Journal of Radiation Oncology Biology Physics | Year: 2013

Purpose: To evaluate the performance and safety of a radiation therapy positioning system (RealEye) based on tracking a radioactive marker (Tracer) implanted in patients with localized prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: We performed a single-arm multi-institutional trial in 20 patients. The iridium-192 (192Ir)-containing Tracer was implanted in the patient together with 4 standard gold seed fiducials. Patient prostate-related symptoms were evaluated with the International Prostate Symptom Score (IPSS) questionnaire. Computed tomography (CT) was performed for treatment planning, during treatment, and after treatment to evaluate the migration stability of the Tracer. At 5 treatment sessions, cone beam CT was performed to test the positioning accuracy of the RealEye. Results: The Tracer was successfully implanted in all patients. No device or procedure-related adverse events occurred. Changes in IPSS scores were limited. The difference between the mean change in Tracer-fiducial distance and the mean change in fiducial-fiducial distance was -0.39 mm (95% confidence interval [CI] upper boundary, -0.22 mm). The adjusted mean difference between Tracer position according to RealEye and the Tracer position on the CBCT for all patients was 1.34 mm (95% CI upper boundary, 1.41 mm). Conclusions: Implantation of the Tracer is feasible and safe. Migration stability of the Tracer is good. Prostate patients can be positioned and monitored accurately by using RealEye. © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.


Shchory T.,Navotek Medical Ltd. | Schifter D.,Tel Aviv Medical Center | Lichtman R.,Tel Aviv Medical Center | Neustadter D.,Navotek Medical Ltd. | Corn B.W.,Tel Aviv Medical Center
International Journal of Radiation Oncology Biology Physics | Year: 2010

Purpose: In radiation therapy there is a need to accurately know the location of the target in real time. A novel radioactive tracking technology has been developed to answer this need. The technology consists of a radioactive implanted fiducial marker designed to minimize migration and a linac mounted tracking device. This study measured the static and dynamic accuracy of the new tracking technology in a clinical radiation therapy environment. Methods and Materials: The tracking device was installed on the linac gantry. The radioactive marker was located in a tissue equivalent phantom. Marker location was measured simultaneously by the radioactive tracking system and by a Microscribe G2 coordinate measuring machine (certified spatial accuracy of 0.38 mm). Localization consistency throughout a volume and absolute accuracy in the Fixed coordinate system were measured at multiple gantry angles over volumes of at least 10 cm in diameter centered at isocenter. Dynamic accuracy was measured with the marker located inside a breathing phantom. Results: The mean consistency for the static source was 0.58 mm throughout the tested region at all measured gantry angles. The mean absolute position error in the Fixed coordinate system for all gantry angles was 0.97 mm. The mean real-time tracking error for the dynamic source within the breathing phantom was less than 1 mm. Conclusions: This novel radioactive tracking technology has the potential to be useful in accurate target localization and real-time monitoring for radiation therapy. © 2010 Elsevier Inc.


Neustadter D.,Navotek Medical Ltd. | Barnea G.,Scientific Consultancy | Stokar S.,Navotek Medical Ltd. | Corn B.,Tel Aviv Medical Center
Medical Physics | Year: 2010

Purpose: A fiducial tracking system based on a novel radioactive tracking technology is being developed for real-time target tracking in radiation therapy. In this study, the authors calculate the radiation dose to the patient, the spouse/caretaker, and the medical staff that would result from a 100 μCi Ir192 radioactive fiducial marker permanently implanted in the prostate of a radiation therapy patient. Methods: Local tissue dose was calculated by Monte Carlo simulation. The patient's whole body effective dose equivalent was calculated by summing the doses to the sensitive organs. Exposure of the spouse/caretaker was calculated from the NRC guidelines. Exposure of the medical staff was based on estimates of proximity to and time spent with the patient. Results: The local dose is below 40 Gy at 5 mm from the marker and below 10 Gy at 10 mm from the marker. The whole body effective dose equivalent to the patient is 64 mSv. The dose to the spouse/caretaker is 0.25 mSv. The annual exposures of the medical staff are 0.2 mSv for a doctor performing implantations and 0.34 mSv for a radiation therapist positioning patients for therapy. Conclusions: The local dose is not expected to have any clinically significant effect on the surrounding tissue which is irradiated during therapy. The dose to the patient is small in comparison to the whole body dose received from the therapy itself. The exposure of all other people is well below the recommended limits. The authors conclude that there is no radiation exposure related contraindication for use of this technology in the radiation treatment of prostate cancer. © 2010 American Association of Physicists in Medicine.


The present invention discloses a method of guiding a tool, the method comprising: location(a) determining at least an indication of a location of a source of radioactivity implanted at a position having a geometric relationship to a target tissue, using at least one radioactivity detecting position sensor; and(b) positioning a tool at a desired relative location with respect to said target tissue based on said determined location.


PubMed | Navotek Medical Ltd.
Type: Evaluation Studies | Journal: International journal of radiation oncology, biology, physics | Year: 2010

In radiation therapy there is a need to accurately know the location of the target in real time. A novel radioactive tracking technology has been developed to answer this need. The technology consists of a radioactive implanted fiducial marker designed to minimize migration and a linac mounted tracking device. This study measured the static and dynamic accuracy of the new tracking technology in a clinical radiation therapy environment.The tracking device was installed on the linac gantry. The radioactive marker was located in a tissue equivalent phantom. Marker location was measured simultaneously by the radioactive tracking system and by a Microscribe G2 coordinate measuring machine (certified spatial accuracy of 0.38 mm). Localization consistency throughout a volume and absolute accuracy in the Fixed coordinate system were measured at multiple gantry angles over volumes of at least 10 cm in diameter centered at isocenter. Dynamic accuracy was measured with the marker located inside a breathing phantom.The mean consistency for the static source was 0.58 mm throughout the tested region at all measured gantry angles. The mean absolute position error in the Fixed coordinate system for all gantry angles was 0.97 mm. The mean real-time tracking error for the dynamic source within the breathing phantom was less than 1 mm.This novel radioactive tracking technology has the potential to be useful in accurate target localization and real-time monitoring for radiation therapy.


Trademark
Navotek Medical Ltd. | Date: 2010-06-29

patient positioning and monitoring system for radiation therapy.


Trademark
Navotek Medical Ltd. | Date: 2011-01-18

System for tracking the position of a tumor of a patient, comprising markers, sensors, computer software for tracking the markers attached to the tumors or to the tissue adjacent to the tumor, and data processors for use in radiotherapy applications.


Patent
Navotek Medical Ltd. | Date: 2011-06-08

System and methods for image guided surgery is provided. The surgical tracking system (100) can include at least one sensor (134) configured to acquire a marker (104) signal associated with a first location of a marker within a body and to output a first signal indicative of the first location, and also further configured to acquire a device signal associated with a second location of a movable imaging device (114) and to output a second signal indicative of the second location. The movable imaging device can be configured to generate a plurality of sequential images. The surgical tracking system can further include at least one processor (210) configured to receive the first signal, the second signal, and the plurality of sequential images, and to generate a plurality of composite images where at least one of the plurality of composite images include a visual indication of the first location on at least one of the plurality of sequential images.


Patent
Navotek Medical Ltd. | Date: 2010-02-24

A device for inserting into body tissue an implant (208) with a medical function, with a channel passing at least partly through the implant, the device comprising:a) a cannulus (202) with a distal end, and with a channel sized to hold the implant;b) a pusher (210) with a channel passing through it, the pusher sized to be situated inside the channel of the cannulus behind the implant, and adapted to push the implant through the distal end of the cannulus into the tissue;c) a restraining element (212) that extends through the channel of the pusher and at least partly through the channel of the implant when they are so situated in the channel of the cannulus, which restrains the implant from accidentally exiting the cannulus, but allows the implant to exit the distal end of the cannulus when it is pushed with a force small enough so as not to damage the function of the implant in the tissue.

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