Naturmuseum Bozen

Bolzano, Italy

Naturmuseum Bozen

Bolzano, Italy
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Kustatscher E.,Naturmuseum Bozen | Kustatscher E.,Ludwig Maximilians University of Munich | Dona H.,Kaiserfeld 9 | Krings M.,Ludwig Maximilians University of Munich
Palaontologische Zeitschrift | Year: 2014

Annalepis zeilleri is one of the most frequently recorded Middle Triassic lycopsid fossils in central Europe and China. The taxon includes tongue-shaped sporophylls with a blunt to mucronate apex and an adaxial sporangium. However, little is known about the arrangement of the sporophylls and the morphology of the plant that produced them. Specimens from the Middle Triassic of Germany consist of wide axes in cross section surrounded by tightly clustered A. zeilleri sporophylls. This suggests that the sporophylls were produced in a strobilus or in intercalary fertile zones along an axis. Moreover, the fossils correspond in structure to certain other Triassic lycopsid remains that are described as Lepacyclotes circularis and L. bechstaedtii; they thus strengthen the concept that Annalepis and Lepacyclotes are congeneric. Since Lepacyclotes has priority over Annalepis, Lepacyclotes zeilleri is the correct name for the taxon. © 2014 Paläontologische Gesellschaft.


Van Konijnenburg-Van Cittert J.H.A.,Naturalis Biodiversity Center | Van Konijnenburg-Van Cittert J.H.A.,Laboratory of Palaeobotany and Palynology | Kustatscher E.,Naturmuseum Bozen | Kustatscher E.,Ludwig Maximilians University of Munich | And 4 more authors.
Neues Jahrbuch fur Geologie und Palaontologie - Abhandlungen | Year: 2016

A branched shoot with several attached microsporangiate strobili of the Rhaetian (late Triassic) herbaceous lycophyte Selaginellites coburgensis is described from Wüstenwelsberg near Coburg, Germany, the locus typicus of the species. The strobili all contain Uvaesporites-type microspores, precisely as the single, detached strobilus fragment found in association with one of the original specimens. ©2016 E.


Van Konijnenburg-Van Cittert J.H.A.,Naturalis Biodiversity Center | Van Konijnenburg-Van Cittert J.H.A.,Laboratory of Palaeobotany and Palynology | Kustatscher E.,Naturmuseum Bozen | Kustatscher E.,Ludwig Maximilians University of Munich | And 6 more authors.
Neues Jahrbuch fur Geologie und Palaontologie - Abhandlungen | Year: 2014

Sterile shoots and a microsporangiate strobilus of a new herbaceous lycophyte, Selaginellites coburgensis nov. spec., are described from the Rhaetian (uppermost Triassic) of Wüstenwelsberg near Coburg, Germany. Shoots branch dichotomously and bear two lateral rows of larger and two median rows of smaller microphylls. Sporophylls are scale-like; sporangia contain Uvaesporites-type spores, which permit a direct comparison of macrofossil evidence with the dispersed spore record. Sellaginellites coburgensis is significant because lycophyte macrofossils are exceedingly rare in the Rhaeto-Liassic of Franconia. The plant probably grew in habitats that were shady and relatively humid, perhaps within dense vegetation and/or in close proximity to bodies of water that locally provided a favourable microclimate. © 2014 E. Schweizerbart'sche Verlagsbuchhandlung, Stuttgart, Germany.


Kustatscher E.,Naturmuseum Bozen | Kustatscher E.,Ludwig Maximilians University of Munich | Dotzler N.,Ludwig Maximilians University of Munich | Taylor T.N.,University of Kansas | And 2 more authors.
Zitteliana Reihe A: Mitteilungen der Bayerischen Staatssammlung fur Palaontologie und Geologie | Year: 2014

The life cycle of prasinophyte microalgae in the order Pyramimonadales (Pyramimonadophyceae, Chlorophyta) includes a unique non-motile stage termed the phycoma. The Rhynie chert Lagerst?tte is one of the most important sources of new information on the diversity of life in an Early Devonian non-marine ecosystem because of the exquisitely preserved fossils of vascular plants, animals, and various groups of microorganisms. It is interesting to note that the prasinophyte phycomata described from the Rhynie chert all occur within accumulations of plant debris intermixed with sediment and other microorganisms; none have been documented in thin sections containing well preserved (in situ) land plants. This is somewhat puzzling since those portions of the chert containing the land plants have been studied much more intensively. The layers containing the phycomata most likely represent litter layers from around the margin or bottom of the small ponds within the Rhynie paleoecosystem.


Kustatscher E.,Naturmuseum Bozen | Kustatscher E.,Ludwig Maximilians University of Munich | Dotzler N.,Ludwig Maximilians University of Munich | Taylor T.N.,University of Kansas | And 2 more authors.
Acta Palaeobotanica | Year: 2014

An assemblage of unusual microfossils occurs within an accumulation of plant debris, hyphae, and various types of propagules in the Early Devonian Rhynie chert. Specimens consist of a vesicle with one or more prominent wings (alae) arising from the surface; one wing forms a rim around the equator of the vesicle. The microfossils are interpreted as phycomata of a prasinophycean green alga based on morphological similarities to Pterospermella, a microfossil similar to phycoma stages of the extant Pterosperma (Pyramimonadales). This report represents the third record of phycomata in the Rhynie chert, suggesting that this Early Devonian ecosystem served as habitat to a variety of prasinophyte algae. Moreover, the new microfossils add to the inventory of fossil freshwater representatives of this predominantly marine group of algae.

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