Naturmuseum

Sankt Gallen, Switzerland

Naturmuseum

Sankt Gallen, Switzerland
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Lopez-Arbarello A.,Ludwig Maximilians University of Munich | Stockar R.,Museo Cantonale di Storia Naturale | Burgin T.,Naturmuseum
PLoS ONE | Year: 2014

The lagerstätten in the Monte San Giorgio have provided excellent fossils representing one of the most important windows to the marine life during the Triassic. Among these fossils, fishes are abundant and extraordinarily well preserved. Most of these fishes represent extinct lineages and were difficult to understand and classify during the early years after discovery. These difficulties usually led to a mixture of species under the same taxonomic name. This is the case of fishes referred to the genus Archaeosemionotus. The name bearing type of A. connectens, the type species of this genus, represents a basal halecomorph, but most other fishes referred to this genus represent basal ginglymodians. Therefore, we conducted this study to clarify the taxonomic status and phylogenetic relationships of A. connectens, which is a member of the family Furidae (Halecomorphi, Ionoscopiformes) representing the second cladistically supported evidence of ionoscopiforms in the Triassic and it is thus one of the two oldest reliable records of this group. Ionoscopiforms have a long stratigraphic range, though their fossil record is rather patchy. In our analysis, the sister taxon of Archaeosemionotus is Robustichthys from the Anisian of China, and they together form a clade with Furo, which is known from several localities ranging from the Early to the Late Jurassic. Other ionoscopiforms are so far known from the Kimmeridgian to the Albian and it is thus evident that recent efforts have concentrated on the later history of the group (Late Jurassic to Cretaceous). The phylogenetic relationships obtained for the Ionoscopiformes do not show a clear palaeobiogeographic pattern, but give important new insights into the origin, divergence date and early history of this clade. © 2014 López-Arbarello et al.


Lopez-Arbarello A.,Ludwig Maximilians University of Munich | Burgin T.,Naturmuseum | Furrer H.,University of Zürich | Stockar R.,Museo Cantonale di Storia Naturale
PeerJ | Year: 2016

The new neopterygian genus Ticinolepis, including two new species T. longaeva and T. crassidens is described from Middle Triassic carbonate platform deposits of the Monte San Giorgio. The anatomy of this fish shows a mosaic of halecomorph and ginglymodian characters and, thus, the new taxon probably represents a basal holostean. During the latest Anisian to earliest Ladinian the two new species coexisted in the intraplatform basin represented by the uppermost Besano Formation, but only T. longaeva sp. nov. inhabited the more restricted basin represented by the Ladinian Meride Limestone (except for the Kalkschieferzone). The more widely distributed type species shows interesting patterns of intraspecific variation including ontogenetic changes and morphological variation over time. The second species presents anatomical features that strongly indicate a strictly durophagous diet. The different distribution of the species is interpreted as a result of habitat partitioning and different adaptability to palaeoenvironmental changes. © 2016 López-Arbarello et al.


PubMed | Ludwig Maximilians University of Munich, Naturmuseum and Museo Cantonale di Storia Naturale
Type: Journal Article | Journal: PloS one | Year: 2014

The lagersttten in the Monte San Giorgio have provided excellent fossils representing one of the most important windows to the marine life during the Triassic. Among these fossils, fishes are abundant and extraordinarily well preserved. Most of these fishes represent extinct lineages and were difficult to understand and classify during the early years after discovery. These difficulties usually led to a mixture of species under the same taxonomic name. This is the case of fishes referred to the genus Archaeosemionotus. The name bearing type of A. connectens, the type species of this genus, represents a basal halecomorph, but most other fishes referred to this genus represent basal ginglymodians. Therefore, we conducted this study to clarify the taxonomic status and phylogenetic relationships of A. connectens, which is a member of the family Furidae (Halecomorphi, Ionoscopiformes) representing the second cladistically supported evidence of ionoscopiforms in the Triassic and it is thus one of the two oldest reliable records of this group. Ionoscopiforms have a long stratigraphic range, though their fossil record is rather patchy. In our analysis, the sister taxon of Archaeosemionotus is Robustichthys from the Anisian of China, and they together form a clade with Furo, which is known from several localities ranging from the Early to the Late Jurassic. Other ionoscopiforms are so far known from the Kimmeridgian to the Albian and it is thus evident that recent efforts have concentrated on the later history of the group (Late Jurassic to Cretaceous). The phylogenetic relationships obtained for the Ionoscopiformes do not show a clear palaeobiogeographic pattern, but give important new insights into the origin, divergence date and early history of this clade.


Klietmann J.,University of Vienna | Nagel D.,University of Vienna | Rummel M.,Naturmuseum | Van Den Hoek Ostende L.W.,Hoek Ostende
Bulletin of Geosciences | Year: 2014

The only marsupial and the Erinaceidae from the Bavarian fissure filling Petersbuch 28 are described. The marsupial is Amphiperatherium frequens erkertshofense, the Erinaceidae are represented by Galerix aurelianensis and an unknown large galericine, which is present only by four isolated teeth. The three species are mostly present by single teeth; distal ends of humeri of Amphiperatherium and Galerix, astragali of Galerix as well as calcanei of Amphiperatherium are also described; the calcaneus for the first time from material which was not in situ.


Klietmann J.,University of Vienna | Metscher B.D.,University of Vienna | van den Hoek Ostende L.W.,Naturalis | Nagel D.,University of Vienna | Rummel M.,Naturmuseum
Geobios | Year: 2013

The dP4 of Desmanella engesseri Ziegler, 1985 from a maxillary which includes the P2 and P3 in crypt, the P4 in eruption and fully erupted dP4 and M1, is described from Petersbuch 28 (Germany; Lower Miocene, MN3/4). The maxillary was studied using X-ray microtomography to make detailed images of the internal and external features of the sample. This is the first record of a dP4 from Desmanella Engesser, 1972. Its shape is unique for fossil talpids, possessing the apomorphic feature of replacing the protocone with a large lingual cingulum. The functional use of deciduous teeth and the process that led to the complete loss of milk teeth in extant talpids are discussed. © 2013 Elsevier Masson SAS.


Klietmann J.,University of Vienna | van den Hoek Ostende L.W.,Naturalis Biodiversity Center | Nagel D.,University of Vienna | Rummel M.,Naturmuseum
Palaeogeography, Palaeoclimatology, Palaeoecology | Year: 2015

Many Miocene localities yielded considerable numbers of eulipotyphlan fossils. The group as a whole is generally considered to be indicative for humid environments, but little is known about the preferences of specific taxa. We discuss the insectivores found in the German fissure filling Petersbuch 28, including an insectivorous marsupial, in an attempt to refine the knowledge of the preferred environments of insectivores. For this, we compared the assemblage in quantitative analyses with other insectivore assemblages of similar age. Our results show that, in full accordance with previous hypotheses, dimylids, most moles and shrews were shown to be indicators for humid environments, like swamps or humid forests, whereas the hedgehogs, the moles Desmanodon and Theratiskos and the shrew Oligosorex were more common in dryer environments. © 2014.


Klietmann J.,University of Vienna | Nagel D.,University of Vienna | Rummel M.,Naturmuseum | van den Hoek Ostende L.W.,Naturalis
Paläontologische Zeitschrift | Year: 2014

In the Miocene, the talpid diversity was much higher than today. Especially the semifossorial and ambulatory moles were farther distributed and more common. Here, the talpids from the Bavarian fissure filling Petersbuch 28 (Early Miocene, MN 3) are described. The uropsiline Desmanella engesseri Ziegler, 1985 is the most frequent species, followed by Myxomygalehutchisoni (Ziegler, 1985), an urotrichine less specialized towards burrowing. The fossorial talpids Talpa sp. and Proscapanusintercedens Ziegler, 1985 are represented by humeri, P. intercedens by a few teeth. Some teeth could not be determined to species level. Among the rich postcranial material, the humerus of Desmanella engesseri was found for the first time. Compared to other Miocene localities, Petersbuch 28 is unique in the dominance of only superficially burrowing and semifossorial talpids. In the time from MN 2 to MN 7 + 8 (Early to Middle Miocene), the fossorial talpids were less dominant during MN 2 and most of MN 3, became more frequent during MN 4 and were predominant from MN 5 onward. © 2014 Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg.


Klietmann J.,University of Vienna | Nagel D.,University of Vienna | Rummel M.,Naturmuseum | Van Den Hoek Ostende L.W.,Naturalis
Palaeobiodiversity and Palaeoenvironments | Year: 2014

The Bavarian fissure filling Petersbuch 28 (Lower Miocene, MN 3/4) yielded a large assemblage of the dimylid Plesiodimylus aff. chantrei. This assemblage includes molars of three incompletely differentiated morphotypes, resembling Plesiodimylus huerzeleri, P. chantrei and P. bavaricus, respectively. This pattern is interpreted as due to ecological reasons and a small time averaging. The lower molars do not show such differentiation. Next to Plesiodimylus, Chainodus intercedens was found, but in far smaller numbers. © 2014 Senckenberg Gesellschaft für Naturforschung and Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg.


Klein H.,Saurierwelt Palaontologisches Museum | Wizevich M.C.,Central Connecticut State University | Thuring B.,Naturhistorisches Museum | Marty D.,Naturhistorisches Museum | And 3 more authors.
Swiss Journal of Palaeontology | Year: 2016

Autochthonous Triassic sediments of the Vieux Emosson Formation near Lac d’Emosson, southwestern Switzerland, have yielded assemblages with abundant archosaur footprints that are assigned to chirotheriids based on pentadactyl pes and manus imprints with characteristic digit proportions. Tridactyl footprints formerly considered as those of dinosaurs are identified as incomplete extramorphological variants of chirotheriids. Recently discovered new sites, including a surface with about 1500 imprints, permit re-evaluation of ichnotaxonomy and modes of preservation. Most common are oval to circular impressions arranged in an “hourglass-like” shape, corresponding to pes-manus couples. Sediment displacement rims indicate the presence of true tracks rather than undertracks. A few well-preserved footprints with distinct digit traces allow closer assignments. Several chirotheriid ichnotaxa are present with Chirotherium barthii, ?Chirotherium sickleri, Isochirotherium herculis, Chirotheriidae cf. Isochirotherium isp. and indeterminate forms. This corresponds with characteristic assemblages from the Buntsandstein of the Germanic Basin. In the study area, the Vieux Emosson Formation is an up to 10 m thick fining-upward sequence with conglomerates, rippled sandstones, siltstones and mudstones and occasionally carbonate nodules. Sedimentological features such as high relief erosion, immature sediments, erosionally truncated metre-scale fining-upward sequences, palaeosols and unidirectional palaeocurrents clearly prove a fluvial depositional environment with sediment transport towards the northwest and the Germanic Basin. This contrasts with former assumptions of a coastal marine environment and a south-facing transport towards the Tethys. The footprints occur in the coarser lower portion of the sequence that is interpreted as a shallow braided river. From Obersand in the eastern Swiss Alps, a surface in dolomitic limestone (Röti Dolomite) is re-examined. The footprints are identified as Chirotherium barthii and were impressed in a carbonate tidal flat environment. Biostratigraphically, the occurrence of characteristic Buntsandstein assemblages with Chirotherium barthii supports an Anisian age of both locations. © 2016, Akademie der Naturwissenschaften Schweiz (SCNAT).


Klietmann J.,University of Vienna | Nagel D.,University of Vienna | Rummel M.,Naturmuseum | van den Hoek Ostende L.W.,Naturalis
Comptes Rendus - Palevol | Year: 2014

The Bavarian fissure filling Petersbuch 28 (Germany, Lower Miocene, MN 3/4) yielded a diverse assemblage of shrews. Soricella discrepans Doben-Florin, 1964 and Paenelimnoecus micromorphus (Doben-Florin, 1964) show bimodal size distributions in some dental elements, which is interpreted as the result of a small time averaging. Two upper incisor types of Miosorex desnoyersianus (Lartet, 1851) were found, also indicating two populations of slightly different times. Apart from these, the fissure yielded Heterosorex neumayrianus (Schlosser, 1887), the only heterosoricid present, Lartetium petersbuchense Ziegler, 1989, L.cf. prevostianum (Lartet, 1851) and Florinia stehlini (Doben-Florin, 1964). The shrews confirm that Petersbuch 28 represents a time period near the MN 3/MN 4 transition. Thus, it fills the gap between the classical localities of Wintershof-West and Petersbuch 2. The two species of Lartetium Ziegler, 1989 are possible immigrants. © 2013 Académie des sciences.

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