Naturhistorisches Museum

Vienna, Austria

Naturhistorisches Museum

Vienna, Austria
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Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: H2020 | Program: RIA | Phase: REFLECTIVE-2-2015 | Award Amount: 2.71M | Year: 2016

Transmitting Contentious Cultural Heritages with the Arts: From Intervention to Co-Production (TRACES) aims to provide new directions for cultural heritage institutions to contribute productively to evolving European identity and reflexive Europeanization. To do so, it deploys an innovative ethnographic/artistic approach, focused on a wide range of types of contentious heritage. Attention to contentious heritage is crucial as it is especially likely to raise barriers to inclusivity and convivial relations, as well as to be difficult to transmit to the public. Transmitted effectively, however, it is potentially especially productive in raising critical reflection and contributing to reflexive Europeanization, in which European identity is shaped by self-awareness and on-going critical reflection. Through rigorous and creative in-depth artistic/ethnographic research, TRACES will provide a systematic analysis of the challenges and opportunities raised by transmitting contentious, awkward and difficult pasts. It will do so by setting up Creative Co-Productions (CCPs) in which artists, researchers, heritage agencies and stakeholders work together in longer term engagements to collaboratively research selected cases of contentious heritage and develop new participatory public interfaces. These will be documented and analysed, including educational research. These interfaces, which include online as well as physical exhibitions and other formats, are part of the significant output planned for TRACES, along with academic publications and a novel reflective Contentious Heritage Manual that will synthesise results to provide directions for future practical reflexive transmission of cultural heritage in Europe. TRACES is a multi-disciplinary team, bringing together established and emerging scholars, and providing high-level expertise, relevant experience and creative energy, to provide a rigorous and innovative approach to the transmission of European cultural heritage.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: H2020 | Program: RIA | Phase: COMPET-08-2014 | Award Amount: 2.00M | Year: 2015

Sample return missions (SRMs) are a critical next step in our exploration of the Solar System and are identified as strategic missions by international space agencies. Europe has a very strong legacy in the curation and research of precious extraterrestrial materials. To maintain European leadership and ensure high-level involvement in future SRMs, a dedicated European Sample Curation Facility (ESCF) to receive and curate returned samples from the Moon, asteroids and Mars, is of critical importance. Euro-CARES will focus on 5 key themes for developing a ESCF: o Planetary Protection- protocols and methods for future SRMs o Instrumentation and Analytical Methods- in the fields of cosmo/geochemistry and biosciences o Facilities and Infrastructures- to curate sensitive extraterrestrial or biological materials o Analogue Materials- that are most appropriate and can be used in end to end SRM planning o Portable Receiving Technologies- used to move samples whilst retaining scientific integrity and bio-containment (for Mars samples) Using the 5 key themes Euro-CARES will: 1) Evaluate and critically assess the state of the art within Europe and internationally to identify critical requirements for the ESCF 2) Determine and verify European readiness levels to identify where investment is required and opportunities for European leadership in scientific and engineering fields related to curating extraterrestrial samples 3) Engage with scientific, industrial, governmental and public stakeholders through community workshops, conferences, publications and educational opportunities 4) Deliver recommendations and roadmaps defining the steps necessary to deliver a ESCF to ensure high-level involvement in future ESA and international SRMs Euro-CARES comprises a team of scientists and engineers from across Europe with internationally recognised expertise in astrobiology, biosciences, cosmo/geochemistry, extraterrestrial sample curation, planetary protection and space exploration.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-CSA-Infra | Phase: INFRA-2012-1.1.16. | Award Amount: 10.15M | Year: 2013

SYNTHESYS3 will create an accessible, integrated European resource for researchers in the natural sciences in Europe and globally. Building on the success of the previous SYNTHESYS IA, the NA will focus on improving collections management of new physical and virtual collections. By focusing the JRA on extracting and enhancing data from digitised collections, SYNTHESYS3 will increase the accessibility of these 390 million strong collections. A wide range of services and access both physical and digital will be provided to a broad range of scientific Users (from biological and geological related disciplines) in a consistent and accessible way. The natural history collections, held within the museums and herbaria, of Europe are World-class in terms of their magnitude and taxonomic coverage. They represent a resource unique in Europe as a model of the diversity of life on earth and are a physical dataset enabling Users to research how the human activity (including climate change) is having an increasingly negative impact on the diversity and distribution of biodiversity, which is threatening the continued provision of ecosystem services essential to human well-being.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: FP7 | Program: CPCSA | Phase: INFRA-2010-1.2.3 | Award Amount: 3.09M | Year: 2010

Partners to this proposal include the six major global programmes exploring the full extent of species diversity, a core dimension in human knowledge of global biodiversity.\nThey are: GBIF and distribution modelling, the EBI/INDSC, and Barcode of Life initiatives and molecular diversity, IUCN Red Lists and the species conservation movement, and the Species 2000 Catalogue of Life taxonomic framework. These will work closely with ELIXIR and LifeWatch, the ESFRI Infrastructures covering biodiversity, and build on the 4D4Life Project that develops the internal e-infrastructure of the Catalogue of Life.\nThe i4Life project is to establish a Virtual Research Community that will enable each of these global projects to engage in a common programme enumerating the extent of life on earth. It builds on the common need of each organisation to specify the entire set of organisms, their growing use of the Catalogue of Life as a common taxonomic resource alongside their own catalogues, and the different expertise that each programme brings to the task.\nThese key players present particular hurdles to Catalogue integration because they a) have established their own architectures, standards and protocols, b) have special requirements, and c) have their own partial catalogues that need to be integrated with the Catalogue of Life in a two way flow.\nIn each case i4Life will design, implement and test the necessary special pipelines, as well as contributing significantly to enhancement of the Catalogue of Life for all to use through the inflows from the partners. By providing access to a common species catalogue within each of the organisations, we expect to contribute a much needed level of knowledge integrity across the various scientific and community studies of the global biota. To make sense of global biodiversity it is vital that these organisations can communicate through a unified view of the extent of life.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-CSA-Infra | Phase: INFRA-2008-1.1.1 | Award Amount: 9.65M | Year: 2009

SYNTHESYS IA will aid in the evolution of a European resource through the creation an accessible, integrated infrastructure for researchers in the natural sciences in Europe and globally. By focusing the JRA on DNA extraction, SYNTHESYS IA will increase the opportunities for Users to exploit a largely untapped facet of the 337 million strong collections. Users will be able to play an active role in generating new knowledge based on molecular and morphological studies. A range of new services and improved access both physical and digital will be provided to a broad range of scientific Users (from biological and geological related disciplines) in a consistent and more easily accessible way. The new tools to be developed and disseminated will give Users the chance to pursue new avenues for independent studies at the leading edge of biodiversity and environmental research.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: H2020 | Program: MSCA-ITN-ETN | Phase: MSCA-ITN-2014-ETN | Award Amount: 3.89M | Year: 2015

BIG4 is a global network to amalgamate the cutting edge methods of genomics, phylogenetics, informatics, taxonomy, semantic biodiversity publishing and citizen science, into highly competitive cross-disciplinary training programme for 15 ESRs with a stronghold in biosystematics. These 15 future leaders will extend the exploration of the four biggest groups of living organisms in a more forward looking way than has been attempted before. The urgent focus on the big four insect groups, i.e. Coleoptera (beetles), Hymenoptera (wasps, ants and bees), Diptera (flies and mosquitoes), and Lepidoptera (butterflies and moths) is justified by the super abundance of this form of Life, and by the growing need by science and society to make better use of the enormous potential hidden in their biological diversity. BIG4 aims [1] to gain a robust systematic knowledge that explains the evolutionary origin, diversification, past and present distributions of living organisms, [2] to model their future dispersal and [3] to predict the traits of species that are yet unknown. Additionally, BIG4 strives for [4] implementing organismal features into engineering, medicine, agricultural or environmental solutions, the insect flight mechanics and more effective pollination to mention just a few. Such knowledge is in a particularly high demand in respect of the four biggest insects groups comprising the most important model organisms, the most dangerous pests or disease vectors, the most abundant invasive species and the most fragile entire species communities undergoing extinction due to habitat destruction. By integrating academia with the business and public sectors, BIG4 will greatly increase services and beneficial products provided by the biosystematics as a science. BIG4 will place insect mega-diversity as a powerful service for economic and societal needs such as environmental monitoring, biological control, biomedicine, or ecological farming.


Klopfstein S.,Naturhistorisches Museum
Zootaxa | Year: 2011

The Diplazontinae identified and described by Setsuya Momoi in the collection of Dr. Kaszab from Mongolia were examined at the Hungarian Natural History Museum in Budapest. Because of insufficient labelling, the type status of some specimens had to be clarified and four lectotypes were designated. Syrphophilus stibarus Momoi,1973 is conspecific with Syrphophilus dilleriator Aubert, 1976, syn. nov., and Syrphoctonus lipothrix (Momoi, 1973) is a junior synonym of Syrphoctonus haemorrhoidalis (Szépligeti, 1898), syn. nov. Diplazon multicolor (Gravenhorst, 1829) is removed from synonymy with Diplazon annulatus (Gravenhorst, 1829), stat. rev. A new species is described, Sussaba mongolica sp. nov., and the male of Syrphoctonus venustus (Dasch, 1964) is re-described to account for the material from Mongolia. The ultrastructure of the tyloids of three species is illustrated by scanning electron micrographs to demonstrate their large variability in the subfamily. Seven species are recorded for the first time from Mongolia, four of which are recorded for the first time from the Eastern Palaearctic. These data on the Mongolian diplazontines provide further evidence for an unusually large proportion of species of this subfamily with a multiregional distribution. Copyright © 2011.


A new isopod species, Eonatatolana geisingensis gen. et sp. nov., is described from Middle Jurassic shallow-water sediments of southern Germany. It shows not only the almost completely preserved dorsal morphology but, in addition, details of the cephalic appendages, the pereiopods, pleopods and uropods. The presence of ambulatory pereiopods I-VII of a wide tridentate mandibular incisor with prominently developed posteriormost tooth and a narrow frontal lamina indicates that the new species belongs to the subfamily Conilerinae of family Cirolanidae within the suborder Cymothoida. It is closer to the species of the modern genus NatatolanaBruce than to any fossil isopod hitherto described. The isopod fossil record as well as current practices of isopod taxonomy in palaeontology are discussed, and the facies distribution and fossilization of isopods is reviewed with examples from the Jurassic. © The Palaeontological Association.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: FP7 | Program: MC-IIF | Phase: FP7-PEOPLE-2013-IIF | Award Amount: 248.38K | Year: 2014

The project is a migration study of a compact population group into a new natural-climatic zone and its existence in new cultural surroundings. As example will be given the Linear Pottery (LBK) and Starevo Cultures. They were the first farmers in Central and South-East Europe, existed in neighbouring territories and were synchronous during 250 years from 5650 to 5400 BC. This research includes several aspects: Economic/social reasons for migrations; Adaptation of newcomers to the new environments; Changes in the culture of the newcomers; Formation of the new culture with syncretic traditions as a result of the coexistence of two cultural groups. This research is interdisciplinary: Typology is applied for the analysis of archaeological materials. Radiocarbon dates define a sequence of cultural changes and a scheme of cultural interactions. The detailed scheme of climatic changes will be used to give an explanation of this Starevo migration, the origins of the LBK and forms of adaptation of the first farmers. The comparative-historical method with the use of ethnographical data will allow reconstructing the forms of human adaptation to climatic changes and different types of cultural contacts. Contacts between these cultures belonged to the non-directed type, when the innovations were integrated into another culture according to cultural interests. However the formation of LBK was associated with another type of contact, when during distribution of the new cultural group in local surroundings a merging of both cultures with a predominance of the intrusive culture took place. Our model of cultural transfer will include an adaptation of new elements by separate individuals with their distribution among members of the society due to factors of prestige/practical significance, the modification of their shape and/or semantic content in the final integration into the cultural matrix.


Burckhardt D.,Naturhistorisches Museum | Ouvrard D.,Natural History Museum in London
Zootaxa | Year: 2012

A revised classification for the world jumping plant-lice (Hemiptera: Psylloidea) is presented comprising all published family and genus-group names. The new classification consists of eight families: Aphalaridae, Carsidaridae, Calophyidae, Homotomidae, Liviidae, Phacopteronidae, Psyllidae and Triozidae. The Aphalaridae, Liviidae and Psyllidae are redefined, 20 family-group names as well as 28 genus-group names are synonymised, and one replacement name is proposed [Sureaca nomen nov., for Acaerus Loginova, 1976]. Forty two new species combinations are proposed resulting from new genus-group synonymies and a replacement name. One subfamily and three genera are considered taxa incertae sedis, and one genus a nomen dubium. Finally eight unavailable names are listed (one family-group and seven genus-group names). Copyright © 2012 • Magnolia Press.

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