Minnetonka, MN, United States
Minnetonka, MN, United States

NatureWorks LLC is a U.S. company that manufactures bioplastics—polymers derived entirely from plant resources—as an alternative to conventional plastic, which is made from petroleum. The commercial quality polymer is made from the carbon found in simple plant sugars such as corn starch to create a proprietary polylactic acid polymer which is marketed under the brand name Ingeo. Headquartered in Minnetonka, Minnesota, NatureWorks is jointly owned by Cargill and PTT Global Chemical, a Thai state-owned company. Wikipedia.


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2-Acetoxyalkanoic acid esters are made in a reaction of a 3,6-dialkyl-1,4-dioxane-2,5-dione or a poly(-hydroxyalkanoic acid), an acetate ester and an alcohol or phenol in the presence of a transesterification catalyst. Unlike previous methods for making 2-acetoxyalkanoic acid esters, this process proceeds in high yield and high selectivity to the desired product.


2-Acetoxyalkanoic acid esters are made in a reaction of an -hydroxyalkanoic acid ester and an acetate ester in the presence of a transesterification catalyst. Unlike previous methods for making 2-acetoxyalkanoic acid esters, this process proceeds in high yield and high selectivity to the desired product.


News Article | May 15, 2017
Site: news.yahoo.com

Facing overstuffed silos and forecasts for another huge harvest this year, U.S. farmers are trying to find new uses for their corn and soybeans. Robust demand for processed foods, animal feed and biofuels isn’t keeping up with a record glut of crops in the U.S. and around the world, after several years of bumper harvests and largely benevolent weather. To sell the surplus, farmers and trade groups are wooing new customers, from car makers to toy companies. In recent years, corn and soybeans have been added to the recipes for Ford Motor Co. seat cushions, IKEA mattresses, Danone SA’s yogurt cups and Procter & Gamble Co.’s Olay moisturizers. Adidas AG’s Reebok brand recently unveiled sneakers made with corn. Lego A/S earlier this year said it was toying with using grain-based materials to mold its famous bricks. Industry groups also are calling for more research into new ways that the crops could replace petroleum as a raw material in industrial and construction applications. “We’re sitting on a pretty good surplus,” says Paul Bertels, vice president of the National Corn Growers Association, which recently called for more research to put corn in more products. “We stepped back and said, ‘We need to find new uses.’ ” U.S. corn and soybean stockpiles swelled to a combined 10.35 billion bushels in the first quarter of 2017, a record. Soybean futures have fallen more than 10% at the Chicago Board of Trade since mid-January. Corn prices are also under pressure. Analysts expect big harvests in South America to increase the global glut, and the U.S. Department of Agriculture said in March that U.S. farmers also are expecting record acreage of soybeans this year. The hunt for alternative uses for grains and oilseeds isn’t new. NatureWorks LLC, the world’s first and largest maker of a bioplastic called PLA, started in 1989 as a Cargill research project. But the multiyear glut, which has pushed many farmers deeper into debt and some out of business, is adding urgency to that work. Argo Genesis Chemical LLC of Illinois recently developed its own highly flexible, soy-made plastics for use in products like road-paving materials, cardboard and diapers adhesives. The company says such compounds can help shield manufacturers from volatile oil prices. “Long term, we see this being the way the plastics industry moves,” says Steve Davies, spokesman for NatureWorks. “There’s tremendous potential to grow.” For consumers of these new products, the use of corn and soybeans could be a positive. Many consumers are willing to pay a premium for sustainability. Switching to raw materials that can be grown year after year allows companies to tout their “green” credentials, though researchers are divided over the overall environmental impact. Still, these new uses account for only a fraction of the output in an industry geared toward cranking out billions of bushels a year for animal feed, alcohol and food. Some 96% of global agricultural land is used to produce food, feed and pastures, according to trade association European Bioplastics. Crops for bioplastics took up just 0.01% in 2014; rubber and cotton plants along with crops for biofuel made up much of the remainder. “Those fringe uses of corn are so specialized that they’re interesting, but really people are looking for uses that develop 5 billion bushels of demand,” said Tomm Pfitzenmaier, a founding partner at Summit Commodity Brokerage in Des Moines, Iowa. “That’s where the big swing could come.” But boosters see room for rapid growth, and point to ethanol’s trajectory in the U.S. as an example. Less than 1% of U.S. corn was used as ethanol in the 1980-81 crop year, according to the Agriculture Department. In 2015-16, 5.2 billion bushels, or 38%, of the U.S. crop became biofuel. Some food-security groups say redirecting grain and soybeans toward factories takes away land that will be needed to feed a growing global population. Others say the added value from such alternative uses won’t trickle down to the farmers themselves, since they aren’t the ones processing the grains into these higher-priced products. “A lot of these folks are going to continue to be caught in the system where they’re getting a tiny fraction of what the final product brings to the processors,” says Greg Fogel, policy director at the National Sustainable Agriculture Coalition. “That’s not going to solve the problems that currently exist with the rural farm economy.” John Motter, an Ohio farmer and chairman of the United Soybean Board, says that for now U.S. farmers need all the buyers they can find. “Farmers are businessmen. We all take a longer view,” he says, proudly pointing out that the seats in his 2013 Ford F-250 pickup truck are made from oilseed foam. That’s the kind of business opportunity farmers want U.S. companies to see in their fields. “Ford isn’t running soy in their seats because they think it’s a neat thing to do,” says Keith Cockerline, director of industrial uses at the United Soybean Board. “It’s because they’re making money at it.” Mr. Parkin is a reporter for The Wall Street Journal in Chicago. Email him at benjamin.parkin@wsj.com.


News Article | May 9, 2017
Site: marketersmedia.com

Biopolymers are polymers that are bio-degradable in nature. Biopolymers are derived from renewable biomass sources such as vegetable oil, starch, proteins and various others; and are unlike fossil fuel plastics which are manufactured from petroleum. Usage of biopolymers is an important step towards sustainable development as it helps in conservation of fossil fuels, coupled with reduction in carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions. Ceskaa Research projects that the global market for Biopolymers in terms of volume will grow 1.8 million tons in 2015 to 2.0 million tons in 2016 at a year-on-year growth rate of 13.7%. In addition, the market is expected to grow at a five-year CAGR of 17.6% from 2016 to 2021, to reach 4.6 million tons by the end of the forecast period. In value terms, the market is expected to grow from $4.2 billion in 2015 to $4.7 billion in 2016 at a year-on-year growth rate of 13.0%. In addition, the market is expected to grow at a five-year CAGR of 16.7% from 2016 to 2021, to reach $10.3 billion by the end of the forecast period. The market is growing strongly in some Asian Countries, Europe and North America with strong directive for green technology revolution. Increasing government’s initiative towards a green environment coupled with the growth of different application industries is set to drive the market for the particular market. The report will cover the market in terms of biopolymers by major types, by major regions, and by application industries. The report will also cover the major trends and challenges affecting the market and the supplier landscape. The key vendors dominating this space include Metabolix Inc., BASF SE, Dupont, Kaneka Corp., Meredian Inc., NatureWorks LLC, Novamont S.P.A., Durect Corp., Aduro Biopolymers LP, Helian Biopolymers B.V, and others. The report aims at estimating the “Global Market for Biopolymers” market for 2015, 2016 and forecast the five-year growth in the market until 2021. Biopolymer Definition Classification Of Biopolymers Types Of Biopolymers Bio-Pet Polyolefins Pha Pla Pbs Bio Polyamide Starch Blends Based Biopolymers Cellulosics Others Applications Of Biopolymers By Industry Packaging Fibers Automotive Agriculture Medical Electronics Others For more information, please visit https://www.wiseguyreports.com/sample-request/507199-global-biopolymers-market-2016-2021


News Article | May 9, 2017
Site: marketersmedia.com

Biopolymers are polymers that are bio-degradable in nature. Biopolymers are derived from renewable biomass sources such as vegetable oil, starch, proteins and various others; and are unlike fossil fuel plastics which are manufactured from petroleum. Usage of biopolymers is an important step towards sustainable development as it helps in conservation of fossil fuels, coupled with reduction in carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions. Ceskaa Research projects that the global market for Biopolymers in terms of volume will grow 1.8 million tons in 2015 to 2.0 million tons in 2016 at a year-on-year growth rate of 13.7%. In addition, the market is expected to grow at a five-year CAGR of 17.6% from 2016 to 2021, to reach 4.6 million tons by the end of the forecast period. In value terms, the market is expected to grow from $4.2 billion in 2015 to $4.7 billion in 2016 at a year-on-year growth rate of 13.0%. In addition, the market is expected to grow at a five-year CAGR of 16.7% from 2016 to 2021, to reach $10.3 billion by the end of the forecast period. The market is growing strongly in some Asian Countries, Europe and North America with strong directive for green technology revolution. Increasing government’s initiative towards a green environment coupled with the growth of different application industries is set to drive the market for the particular market. The report will cover the market in terms of biopolymers by major types, by major regions, and by application industries. The report will also cover the major trends and challenges affecting the market and the supplier landscape. The key vendors dominating this space include Metabolix Inc., BASF SE, Dupont, Kaneka Corp., Meredian Inc., NatureWorks LLC, Novamont S.P.A., Durect Corp., Aduro Biopolymers LP, Helian Biopolymers B.V, and others. The report aims at estimating the “Global Market for Biopolymers” market for 2015, 2016 and forecast the five-year growth in the market until 2021. Biopolymer Definition Classification Of Biopolymers Types Of Biopolymers Bio-Pet Polyolefins Pha Pla Pbs Bio Polyamide Starch Blends Based Biopolymers Cellulosics Others Applications Of Biopolymers By Industry Packaging Fibers Automotive Agriculture Medical Electronics Others For more information, please visit https://www.wiseguyreports.com/sample-request/507199-global-biopolymers-market-2016-2021


2-Acetoxyalkanoic acid esters are made in a reaction of a 3,6-dialkyl-1,4-dioxane-2,5-dione or a poly(-hydroxyalkanoic acid), an acetate ester and an alcohol or phenol in the presence of a transesterification catalyst. Unlike previous methods for making 2-acetoxyalkanoic acid esters, this process proceeds in high yield and high selectivity to the desired product.


Patent
Hitachi Zosen Corporation, NatureWorks, Nagoya University and Tohoku Electric Power Co. | Date: 2012-09-11

This invention provides a method for synthesizing semi-crystalline polylactides (PLA) even from a lactide mixture including meso-LA and rac-LA. According to the invention, when a mixture of racemic lactide and meso-lactide ispolymerized using a catalyst capable of iso-selectively polymerizing L-lactide and D-lactide, an amorphous poly (meso-lactide) block is formed from meso-lactide and a semi-crystalline poly (racemic lactide) block is formed from racemic lactide by separately polymerizing racemic lactide and meso-lactide by taking advantage of a difference in physicochemical properties between racemic lactide and meso-lactide, whereby polylactide which is semi-crystalline as a whole is produced.


Yeast cells are transformed with an exogenous xylose isomerase gene. Additional genetic modifications enhance the ability of the transformed cells to ferment xylose to ethanol or other desired fermentation products. Those modifications include deletion of non-specific or specific aldose reductase gene(s), deletion of xylitol dehydrogenase gene(s) and/or overexpression of xylulokinase.


Patent
NatureWorks | Date: 2016-06-28

Polylactide fibers are made from a blend of polylactides. One of the polylactides has a ratio of R-lactic and S-lactic units from 8:92 to 92:8. The second polylactide has a ratio of the R-lactic and S-lactic units of 97:3 or 3:97. The ratio of the R-lactic units to S-lactic units in the blend is from 7:93 to 25:75 or from 75:25 to 93:7. The polylactide fiber contains at least 5 Joules of polylactide crystallites per gram of polylactide resin in the fiber.


Patent
NatureWorks | Date: 2013-09-27

Lactic acid equivalents are recovered from a starting lactide stream by catalytically racemizing a portion of the lactide in the stream at a temperature of 180 C. or below. This increases the proportion of two species of lactide (i.e., at least two of S,S-, R,R- or meso-lactide) at the expense of the third species. The racemized mixture so obtained can be separated to recover some or all of one or more of the lactide species from the remaining lactide species, by a process such as melt crystallization or distillation. Impurities in the starting lactide stream usually are retained mostly in the remaining meso-lactide, so a highly purified S,S- and/or R,R-lactide stream can be produced in this manner. Such a purified S,S- and R,R-lactide stream is suitable for polymerization to form a polylactide.

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