Nature Conservancy of Canada

Ottawa, Canada

Nature Conservancy of Canada

Ottawa, Canada
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News Article | May 19, 2017
Site: www.marketwired.com

OTTAWA, ON--(Marketwired - May 19, 2017) - As the Auditor General reported on numbers just south of the Hill, meanwhile, on the Hill's eastern side, the numbers of living species were tallied, as Parliamentarians led a demonstration nature count to launch BioBlitz Canada 150, a nation-wide Canada 150 Signature project. "This fascinating project will help us raise our environmental awareness," said the Honourable Mélanie Joly, Minister of Canadian Heritage. "Let's take this opportunity to celebrate Canada 150 by connecting with Canada's natural beauty and learning more about Canada's wild species -- a priceless resource." In only 45 minutes, the Parliamentarians' teams blitzed an impressive 137 species of the air, land and water, all logged onto the national iNaturalist.ca database. This, for a location in middle of Canada's capital, downtown, within centimetres of where hundreds of tourists walk by, and metres from the turbulent Ottawa River, at historic flood levels only days before. Two squads vied in a little friendly contention, this time outside Parliament, by representatives of the different political stripes, plus the Clerk of the House of Commons on behalf of all the Hill officials. Several are top-notch naturalists in their own right, and they were joined by some local specialists. The Parliamentary Secretary for Science Kate Young cheered them on, and added her estimate of how many species would be found. Estimates ranged from 3,100 species to 67 (the latter more symbolic than serious). The closest to the actual total was by MP (and professional biologist) Richard Cannings (South Okanagan-West Kootenay) who predicted 167. Among the smallest of the species were barely visible freshwater plankton. A special find was a Yellowbanded Bumble Bee, a species listed as "Special Concern" by the Committee on the Status of Endangered Wildlife in Canada. Among the largest species identified was a Butternut tree along the escarpment of the Hill. A mere ten minutes drive away, the maximum species list is 3,592, in the Gatineau Park area, site of the Bioblitz Canada 150 National Capital BioBlitz for the public on June 10-11. This tally has been compiled over decades by constant surveying and by experts in the most obscure taxa -- and even there, a species new to science was added this past year. Other bioblitzes are set for the next days and months across Canada: there will be 35 official events, with a growing list of independent projects posted at bioblitzcanada.ca. CWF and its partners in conservation across the country call on Canadians to join in all year at a Bioblitz Canada 150 event or on their own with the resources available through the website. The CWF will be inviting all Canadian to play along by guessing the total species identified under the project as of October 31, 2017, the end of the events season. About the Canadian Wildlife Federation: The Canadian Wildlife Federation is dedicated to fostering awareness and appreciation of our natural world. By spreading knowledge of human impacts on the environment, sponsoring research, promoting the sustainable use of natural resources, recommending legislative changes and co-operating with likeminded partners, CWF encourages a future in which Canadians can live in harmony with nature. Visit CanadianWildlifeFederation.ca for more information. About BioBlitz Canada: BioBlitz Canada is a national partnership of leading conservation, education and research organizations with the goal to document Canada's biodiversity by connecting the public with nature in a scientist-led participatory survey of life from sea to sea to sea, and make sure this important information can be useful to current and future science, with open-source access to all. Its vision is to help Canadians learn about and connect with nature, be it in one's own backyard or the most important ecological sites in Canada. Other partners in conservation include: Alliance of Natural History Museums of Canada, Biodiversity Institute of Ontario, Biological Survey of Canada, Birds Studies Canada, Canadian Museum of Nature, Canadian Wildlife Service (Environment and Climate Change Canada), iNaturalist Canada, Nature Canada, Nature Conservancy of Canada, NatureServe Canada, New Brunswick Museum, Parks Canada, RARE Charitable Research Reserve, Royal Ontario Museum, Royal Saskatchewan Museum, Stanley Park Ecology Society, Toronto Zoo, Vancouver Aquarium and other organizations. About iNaturalist Canada: Launched in 2015, iNaturalist Canada is a virtual place where Canadians can record and share what they see in nature, interact with other nature watchers, and learn about Canada's wildlife. The app is run by the Canadian Wildlife Federation (CWF) and the Royal Ontario Museum (ROM) in collaboration with iNaturalist.org and the California Academy of Sciences. Parks Canada, NatureServe Canada and CWF's Hinterland Who's Who have been key partners in the development of iNaturalist Canada and will continue to play a role in the program. Image Available: http://www.marketwire.com/library/MwGo/2017/5/19/11G139307/Images/BioBlitz_Canada_150_Logo-06e7dfbae1048b518343499c85e03879.jpg Image Available: http://www.marketwire.com/library/MwGo/2017/5/19/11G139307/Images/mw1bggo93tgma01pcmtvvmfo1f6q2-fc5e904644859ce3a72a8d7d3d8fc3dc.jpg Image Available: http://www.marketwire.com/library/MwGo/2017/5/19/11G139307/Images/mw1bggntv641hf8vev1qkp1rq11sia2-9bd032cc4beaac678edd64a202b2a648.jpg Image Available: http://www.marketwire.com/library/MwGo/2017/5/19/11G139307/Images/mw1bggnkbkth8glup6q614raedl2-d3af64f9d31da9929d8912828e52264b.jpg


TELUS commits $750,000 over the next three years as official technology and innovation partner Efforts to protect Canada's landscapes and their species-at-risk have received a big boost. On the occasion of Canadian Environment Week, the Nature Conservancy of Canada (NCC) has announced a technology and innovation partnership with TELUS to support conservation efforts in all 10 provinces. The three-year, $750,000 agreement will provide NCC with internet connectivity, data capacity, hardware, a wide area network (WAN) and new phone systems, to help more effectively protect nearly 3,000,000 acres (1,214,056 hectares) of natural spaces. This will support direct protection of habitats for more than one-quarter of Canada's most imperiled plants and animals including 75 of Canada's most endangered species. "Our staff are in the field tracking some of Canada's most endangered species and habitats. They will now be able to snap photos of endangered shorebirds emerging from nests, quickly attach maps, geo-reference the site and send that to our offices, thanks to TELUS," said Dan Kraus, national conservation biologist with the Nature Conservancy of Canada. "This type of information is crucial to identifying areas in Canada that need protection, monitoring our existing lands and assessing what conservation actions are needed." Conservation today depends on big data and digital infrastructure to help inform securement and management activities. In caring for nearly three million acres of habitat across the country, NCC relies on vast amounts of mapping and scientific information in its on-the-ground, conservation work. From hand-held GPS devices, to drone footage and satellite imagery, staff will now have better connections, faster internet access and the latest technology when making decisions as illustrated in this video. "As a global leader in sustainability, conservation is one of the ways we are making the future friendly. We are proud to be the official technology partner of the Nature Conservancy of Canada," said Andrea Goertz, chief communications & sustainability officer, TELUS. "This substantial investment will provide NCC with the latest technology innovations so they're able to more effectively focus their efforts and existing resources on protecting Canada's unique and special areas so together we can create a healthier, more sustainable future for all Canadians." Since 2010, TELUS has invested $1.47M in NCC initiatives as part of a focus on protecting Canada's natural environment, connecting their customers to nature and preserving wildlife and animal habitats. This continued partnership will also help NCC engage more than 7,500 enthusiastic volunteers, including TELUS employees, in stewarding and restoring conserved lands across the country. "The Nature Conservancy of Canada's mandate includes connecting Canadians with nature. This generous contribution by TELUS will help get more people and volunteers involved in local conservation and stewardship projects," said Aaron Bilyea, national director of marketing with the Nature Conservancy of Canada. "It will also get people thinking about the places they want to see protected. We want more Canadians to care about these lands and waters and participate in helping protect them." TELUS (TSX:T)(NYSE:TU) is Canada's fastest-growing national telecommunications company, with $12.9 billion of annual revenue and 12.7 million subscriber connections, including 8.6 million wireless subscribers, 1.7 million high-speed Internet subscribers, 1.4 million residential network access lines and 1.1 million TELUS TV customers. TELUS provides a wide range of communications products and services, including wireless, data, Internet protocol (IP), voice, television, entertainment and video. TELUS is also Canada's largest healthcare IT provider, and TELUS International delivers business process solutions around the globe. In support of our philosophy to give where we live, TELUS, our team members and retirees have contributed over $482 million to charitable and not-for-profit organizations and volunteered more than 7.7 million hours of service to local communities since 2000. Created in 2005 by President and CEO Darren Entwistle, TELUS' 12 Canadian community boards and 5 International boards have led the Company's support of grassroots charities and have contributed more than $60 million in support of 5,595 local charitable projects, enriching the lives of more than 2 million children and youth, annually. TELUS was honoured to be named the most outstanding philanthropic corporation globally for 2010 by the Association of Fundraising Professionals, becoming the first Canadian company to receive this prestigious international recognition. For more information about TELUS, please visit telus.com. The Nature Conservancy of Canada is the nation's leading land conservation organization, working to protect our most important natural areas and the species they sustain. Since 1962, NCC and its partners have helped to protect 2.8 million acres (more than 1.1 million hectares), coast to coast.


News Article | May 12, 2017
Site: www.marketwired.com

Discovering Biodiversity Even at the Heart of the Nation's Capital OTTAWA, ON--(Marketwired - May 12, 2017) - Next May 16, right at Parliament Hill itself, comes the launch of a new cross-Canada initiative, BioBlitz Canada 150, one of the Canada 150 Signature Projects. Coordinated by the Canadian Wildlife Federation and more than 60 partner organizations, this series of BioBlitz events will reach thousands of Canadians from sea to sea to sea in a celebration of our wild natural heritage. The launch will take a "nature selfie" of the Hill, outdoors, in habitat that lives on at this historic site. A select all-party squad of parliamentarians, some of whom are accomplished scientists in their own right, will team up with expert naturalists and head out to demonstrate what a BioBlitz is. Before media representatives and a film crew, they will have 45 minutes to survey a section along the base of the wooded slopes and the riverside, in a friendly race to list all the living species they can see, hear or reach. "This fascinating project will help us raise our environmental awareness," said the Honourable Mélanie Joly, Minister of Canadian Heritage. "Let's take this opportunity to celebrate Canada 150 by connecting with Canada's natural beauty and learning more about Canada's wild species -- a priceless resource." "BioBlitz Canada 150 calls all citizens to be citizen-scientists this year," added Rick Bates, CEO of the Canadian Wildlife Federation. "Canadians, like our parliamentarians, range from very expert to just getting to know our wildlife better. But everyone can truly contribute real scientific knowledge in 2017 for the future of Canada's natural heritage." Leading the way, Senator Rosa Galvez (Independent) and MPs Will Amos (Liberal), Richard Cannings (NDP), Elizabeth May (Green) and Robert Sopuck (Conservative) will show how Canadians everywhere can come together too in 2017 to explore Canada's rich biodiversity. In 2017, 35 official BioBlitz events across the country will include 5 flagships in Regina, Toronto, Vancouver, Quebec City and Halifax, with 20 community celebrations and science activities, as well as 10 specialized science-intensive surveys by taxonomic experts. The BioBlitz Canada 150 events, including the demonstration launch, will gather real scientific data, tracking the changing species mix in each area -- maybe even making discoveries of species new to science. This information will ground our knowledge of such issues as climate change and the state of our biodiversity. The results will be shared in the public domain, accessible to all citizens, wildlife managers, conservation groups, science and education institutions, and government organizations to help shape wise decisions now and into the future to help conserve these wild species for generations to come. For more information about BioBlitz Canada 150 and for the list of events, as they roll out across the country, please visit bioblitzcanada.ca. The Canadian Wildlife Federation is dedicated to fostering awareness and appreciation of our natural world. By spreading knowledge of human impacts on the environment, sponsoring research, promoting the sustainable use of natural resources, recommending legislative changes and co-operating with like-minded partners, CWF encourages a future in which Canadians can live in harmony with nature. Visit CanadianWildlifeFederation.ca for more information. BioBlitz Canada is a national partnership of leading conservation, education and research organizations with the goal to document Canada's biodiversity by connecting the public with nature in a scientist-led participatory survey of life from sea to sea to sea, and make sure this important information can be useful to current and future science, with open-source access to all. Its vision is to help Canadians learn about and connect with nature, be it in one's own backyard or the most important ecological sites in Canada. Alliance of Natural History Museums of Canada, Biodiversity Institute of Ontario, Biological Survey of Canada, Birds Studies Canada, Canadian Museum of Nature, Canadian Wildlife Service (Environment and Climate Change Canada), iNaturalist Canada, Nature Canada, Nature Conservancy of Canada, NatureServe Canada, New Brunswick Museum, Parks Canada, RARE Charitable Research Reserve, Royal Ontario Museum, Royal Saskatchewan Museum, Stanley Park Ecology Society, Toronto Zoo, Vancouver Aquarium and other organizations. About iNaturalist Canada: Launched in 2015, iNaturalist Canada is a virtual place where Canadians can record and share what they see in nature, interact with other nature watchers, and learn about Canada's wildlife. The app is run by the Canadian Wildlife Federation (CWF) and the Royal Ontario Museum (ROM) in collaboration with iNaturalist.org and the California Academy of Sciences. Parks Canada, NatureServe Canada and CWF's Hinterland Who's Who have been key partners in the development of iNaturalist Canada and will continue to play a role in the program.


News Article | November 10, 2016
Site: www.marketwired.com

A new slate of individuals, not-for-profit organisations and businesses are recipients of the 2016 Nature Inspiration Awards from the Canadian Museum of Nature. They include a teen environmental ambassador, a marine research network, a multimedia company that tells nature stories, a mining company that implements environmental practices, a visionary CEO of a conservancy organisation, a company that leads workshops on sustainability, and an advocate for humane trapping standards. Winners were announced this evening at a gala hosted by the museum, which is Canada's national museum of natural history and natural sciences. These awards, inaugurated by the museum in 2014, recognize individuals, groups and organizations whose leadership, innovation and creativity connect Canadians with nature and the natural world. The 2016 awards cover seven categories: Youth (aged 17 and younger), Adults, Not-for-Profits (small to medium), Not-for-Profits (large), Businesses (small to medium), Businesses (large), and a Lifetime Achievement Award. The 2016 winners include: Ta'Kaiya Blaney, a First Nations singer and environmental youth leader; John Lounds, head of the Nature Conservancy private land trust; the Ocean Tracking Network, a research group at Dalhousie University that promotes ocean conservation; SK Films, a nature documentary leader in the IMAX film industry; the Natural Step Canada, which leads workshops focussed on creating a sustainable society; and Teck Resources, which has implemented environmental measures for its mining operations. The lifetime achievement award recognizes Neal Jotham for his concerted efforts over five decades to establish humane regulations for the fur-trapping industry. Videos about each of the winners can be seen at nature.ca. "There are many reasons that drive people and organisations to seek a more healthy engagement with the natural world. This year's winners reflect the scope of this involvement and they are an inspiration for others," says Meg Beckel, CEO and President of the Canadian Museum of Nature, which developed the awards. "We congratulate not only the winners, but also all those who submitted nominations this year, and we are grateful for the opportunity to recognize their achievements." A jury selected the winners after paring down the applications to a shortlist. Winners receive $5,000 that they can designate to a program of their choice. The 2016 awards were supported by presenting sponsor Enbridge, Inc. and media sponsors The Walrus and The Globe and Mail. Bruce Power was a category sponsor (Not-for-Profits, large). "We are pleased to support the 2016 Nature Inspiration Awards, which recognizes the diverse activities and projects that Canadians are undertaking to promote environmental innovation and sustainability," says Linda Coady, Chief Sustainability Officer, Enbridge Inc. "This year's group of winning individuals and organizations are truly inspiring, and it is our privilege to help sponsor these national awards." As President and CEO, John Lounds has guided the Nature Conservancy of Canada to become Canada's leading private land trust. Working with individuals and groups, this not-for-profit works to conserve more than one million hectares of ecologically significant land. Lounds has tripled the Nature Conservancy's budget and continues to inspire staff and volunteers through his leadership. At age 10, Ta'Kaiya's first song and video "Shallow Waters" brought international attention to the impact of oil spills on otter populations in British Columbia. She works with the Salish Sea Youth Foundation, a Canadian First Nations Youth organisation dedicated to the restoration of wildlife populations in the Salish Sea. As a UN Youth Ambassador for Native Children's Survival, she also champions the rights of indigenous youth in environmental protection. The Natural Step Canada coordinates workshops to make meaningful progress toward a sustainable society. Using a set of principles to define environment sustainability, Natural Step has successfully worked with dozens of companies to realign company operations. Its Change Labs, and IMPACT! Champions programs bring together businesses, governments, NGOs and individuals for discussion and resolution of environmental conflicts. The Ocean Tracking Network, based at Dalhousie University, brings together researchers and marine experts from around the world to monitor aquatic life. The network tracks the movements, migrations and habitat use of marine animals. The collected data in turn serves communities and governments to manage regional and global concerns, from fisheries management to impacts of climate change. For more than 18 years, SK Films has been creating and distributing multimedia productions about nature. The company is a leader in the Giant Screen/IMAX® industry, and inspires viewers to take action about the environment. Recent productions include Flight of the Butterflies 3D and the Water Brothers, a TV and online series that includes hands-on information and ideas for projects. Teck Resources has developed an environmental-management strategy to mitigate, or avoid the environmental impacts of its mining operations. Careful planning and judicious investments are focussed on helping closed mines return to a state of net-positive biodiversity, with self-sustaining ecosystems that can be used for years to come. Over five decades, Neal Jotham has played a central role in the creation and adoption of international standards on humane animal traps used in the fur industry. First as a volunteer, and then as executive director of the Canadian Federation of Humane Societies, he always remained true to his goal: to improve the animal-welfare aspects of trapping. Through Neal's efforts, an international humane trap standard was adopted in 1999, and recognized through a trade agreement between Canada, the European Union and the Russian Federation. In addition to Meg Beckel, the jury included Shelley Ambrose, Executive Director/Co-Publisher, The Walrus; Linda Coady, Chief Sustainability Officer, Enbridge Inc.; Jack Cockwell, Chairman/CEO, Partners Limited; Philip Crawley, Publisher, The Globe and Mail; John Geiger, CEO, Royal Canadian Geographic Society; Geoff Green, Founder and Executive Director, Students on Ice; and Arnold Witzig, Co-Founder, Arctic Inspiration Prize. About the Canadian Museum of Nature: The Canadian Museum of Nature is Canada's national museum of natural history and natural sciences. The museum provides evidence-based insights, inspiring experiences and meaningful engagement with nature's past, present and future. It achieves this through scientific research, a 14.6-million specimen collection, education programs, signature and travelling exhibitions, and a dynamic web site, nature.ca.


Lapointe N.W.R.,Nature Conservancy of Canada | Tremblay M.A.,Nature Conservancy of Canada | Barna H.,Nature Conservancy of Canada
Natural Areas Journal | Year: 2016

To identify effective strategies for managing and enhancing partnerships between conservation organizations (CO) and academic researchers, we interviewed 11 Canadian environmental nongovernmental and governmental organizations that manage conservation lands. Conservation organizations were asked to describe their strategies for setting research priorities, finding research partners, providing incentives, specifying and obtaining deliverables, applying results, and measuring the success of partnerships with academic researchers. Several effective strategies were identified for enhancing the success of academic partnerships. Many COs develop lists of internal research priorities to communicate to the research community beyond their existing networks. Funding is widely viewed as the most effective incentive; however, most COs are limited in the amount of direct research funding they can provide. Instead, they rely on alternative incentives, including providing access to land and data, accommodations at research stations, equipment, and expertise. Peer-reviewed articles are often the most desirable deliverables; however, alternate deliverables are usually welcomed by COs. These include reports, data sets, literature reviews, and workshops or seminars where researchers share knowledge directly with practitioners. Establishing written contracts for deliverables and following up by phone or email helps to ensure that deliverables are received. Participation in research by CO practitioners serving on student committees or as coauthors helps to keep research relevant to COs' needs. COs can develop systems to track and apply research conducted in partnership with academics, including developing records for completed projects, and disseminating research results beyond the project team.


Wang M.,Northwest University, China | Wang M.,McGill University | Moore T.R.,McGill University | Talbot J.,University of Montréal | Riley J.L.,Nature Conservancy of Canada
Global Biogeochemical Cycles | Year: 2015

Northern peatlands have stored large amounts (∼500 Pg) of carbon (C) since the last glaciation. Combined with peat C are nutrients such as nitrogen (N), phosphorus (P), calcium (Ca), magnesium (Mg), and potassium (K), each of which plays an important role in plant production, litter decomposition, and the biogeochemical functioning of peatlands. Yet little attention has been given to the amounts of these nutrients stored in northern peatlands and their stoichiometry with C. Here we use data on nutrient concentrations in over 400 peat profiles in Ontario, Canada, representing bogs, fens, and swamps and their vegetation. We show that the C:N ratio is high (>40:1) in vegetation and litter but declines through the peat profiles to reach ratios between 22:1 and 29:1 in peat below 50 cm. In contrast, the C:P ratio rises from vegetation and litter (500:1 to 1300:1) to 1500:1 to 2000:1 in the lower part of the peat profile. Ratios of C to Ca, Mg, and K vary with peatland type. Most of these stoichiometric changes occur in the early stages of organic matter decomposition, where the litter structure remains intact. We estimate that ∼18 Pg of N has been stored in northern peatlands since deglaciation, reflecting high N accumulation rates (∼0.8 g m-2 yr-1), whereas P accumulation is small (∼0.3 Pg, ∼0.016 g m-2 yr-1), indicating that P is quickly recycled in the surface layers. ©2014. American Geophysical Union. All Rights Reserved.


MISSISSAUGA, Ontario--(BUSINESS WIRE)--Manitoulin Transport has donated a total of $100,000 to Nature Conservancy of Canada (NCC) with this year's annual holiday gift. The funds will be used to help NCC deliver on its mandate to conserve and protect natural habitats in Canada of ecological significance. "We are delighted to continue our support of NCC -- a highly respected organization known to produce tangible results," said Jeff Smith, executive vice-president, Manitoulin Transport and Manito


News Article | July 10, 2015
Site: www.techtimes.com

Bumblebees are having a hard time dealing with climate change, say researchers who express fear they could go extinct as suitable habitats for the insects shrink. Global warming is steadily reducing the areas where the bees — important pollinators of our food supplies — are found in both North America and in Europe, the scientists say. Writing in the journal Science, researchers, including Leif Richardson of the University of Vermont, report their examination of more than 420,000 current and historical records of a number of bumblebee species has confirmed steep declines in their numbers at continental scales. The loss of habitats will have an impact on more than just the bees, Richardson says. "Bumblebees pollinate many plants that provide food for humans and wildlife," he explains. "If we don't stop the decline in the abundance of bumblebees, we may well face higher food prices, diminished varieties, and other troubles." While many species such as butterflies are adapting to climate change by enlarging or shifting their habitats as temperatures change, that's not the case with bumblebees, the research team notes. Northern populations are staying in place, while those in southern habitats find those habitats retreating north away from the equator. That was unexpected, Richardson says. "The bees are losing range on their southern margin and failing to pick up territory at the northern margin — so their habitat range is shrinking," he says. Two other known major threats to healthy bumblebee populations — pesticides and changes in land use — aren't the culprit in the current case, the scientists say. The "range compression" of suitable bumblebee habitats is tracking exactly with warming global temperatures, they report. In the 110 years recorded in the data the researchers examined, bumblebees have lost around 185 miles from the southern edge of their habitat ranges in both North America and Europe. "The scale and pace of these losses are unprecedented," says study leader and biologist Jeremy Kerr from the University of Ottawa. One reason bumblebees are having trouble adapting to warmer temperatures could be explained by their evolutionary origins, says Alana Pindar, an ecologist at the Nature Conservancy of Canada. "Bumblebees originated perhaps some 35 million years ago in cool to temperate environments," she explains. "Most other species that have often shown positive responses to climate change, like butterflies, evolved in the tropics." The loss of habitat is a great concern, she says, because bumblebees pollinate more fruits, vegetables and flowers than the European honeybee does.


News Article | November 30, 2016
Site: www.marketwired.com

BioBlitz Canada 150 will put Canadians in direct contact with our wildlife OTTAWA, ON--(Marketwired - November 30, 2016) - As part of Canada's 150th celebrations, the Canadian Wildlife Federation (CWF), with BioBlitz Canada and other partners in conservation, will carry out a series of public bioblitzes across the nation to help showcase and conserve our natural heritage. "This fascinating project will engage, inspire and strengthen the environmental consciousness of Canadians all across the country. Let's take the opportunity being offered to us to become the guardians of our Canadian wildlife, an invaluable source of wealth," said the Hon. Mélanie Joly, Minister of Canadian Heritage. BioBlitz Canada 150 is one of 38 Signature Projects recently announced by Minister Joly under the federal Canada 150 initiative. BioBlitz Canada 150 events will bring together thousands of Canadians from all ages, cultural backgrounds and walks of life to explore Canada's terrestrial, freshwater, coastal and marine environments. The BioBlitz Canada 150 project will generate new scientific data and document new species, information which is critical for decisions on the state of Canada's biodiversity. In the next days, for instance, the Committee on the Status of Endangered Wildlife in Canada (COSEWIC) will announce their assessments of which species are at risk of extinction and which may be holding their own. These assessments are based on the kind of data that the BioBlitz Canada 150 project will provide. "Wildlife and nature are key parts of the Canadian identity and we're very pleased the Government of Canada recognizes and supports this aspect of our national celebration," said Rick Bates, CEO of the Canadian Wildlife Federation. "We look forward to having people from across the country participate in a bioblitz as part of the 150th anniversary celebrations." Public bioblitz events will blend science with community and youth engagement. Scientists and interested members of the public will go out together in nature to find, identify and record as many species as possible in a given time. The BioBlitz Canada 150 project will feature five flagship events in urban areas, 20 community events and 10 science-intense blitzes. Individuals, schools and organizations will also be encouraged to organize their own bioblitz events to share the celebration of Canada's wildlife and contribute to the national database. Locations, results and activity guides will be posted on the new BioBlitzCanada.ca website and observations will be tracked in real time through iNaturalist.ca, the official database platform for BioBlitz Canada 150. The website will feature a variety of other resources to encourage public participation throughout the year. Discoveries will be showcased to the Canadian public, wildlife managers, conservation organizations, educational institutions and government agencies to shape conservation decisions which will help to inform choices on such issues such as climate change and loss of biodiversity and ensure these wild species and spaces remain for generations to come. The project will create Canada's nature selfie for our 150th. For more information and to watch the project unfold visit BioBlitzCanada.ca. About the Canadian Wildlife Federation: The Canadian Wildlife Federation is dedicated to fostering awareness and appreciation of our natural world. By spreading knowledge of human impacts on the environment, sponsoring research, promoting the sustainable use of natural resources, recommending legislative changes and co-operating with like-minded partners, CWF encourages a future in which Canadians can live in harmony with nature. Visit CanadianWildlifeFederation.ca for more information. About BioBlitz Canada: BioBlitz Canada is a national partnership of leading conservation, education and research organizations with the goal to document Canada's biodiversity by connecting the public with nature in a scientist-led participatory survey of life from sea to sea to sea, and make sure this important information can be useful to current and future science, with open-source access to all. Its vision is to help Canadians learn about and connect with nature, be it in one's own backyard or the most important ecological sites in Canada. Alliance of Natural History Museums of Canada, Biodiversity Institute of Ontario, Biological Survey of Canada, Birds Studies Canada, Canadian Museum of Nature, Canadian Wildlife Service (Environment and Climate Change Canada), iNaturalist Canada, Nature Canada, Nature Conservancy of Canada, NatureServe Canada, New Brunswick Museum, Parks Canada, RARE Charitable Research Reserve, Royal Ontario Museum, Royal Saskatchewan Museum, Stanley Park Ecology Society, Toronto Zoo, Vancouver Aquarium and other organizations. About iNaturalist Canada: Launched in 2015, iNaturalist Canada is a virtual place where Canadians can record and share what they see in nature, interact with other nature watchers, and learn about Canada's wildlife. The app is run by the Canadian Wildlife Federation (CWF) and the Royal Ontario Museum (ROM) in collaboration with iNaturalist.org and the California Academy of Sciences. Parks Canada, NatureServe Canada and CWF's Hinterland Who's Who have been key partners in the development of iNaturalist Canada and will continue to play a role in the program.


TORONTO, ONTARIO--(Marketwired - Dec. 13, 2016) - As Canadians focus on the upcoming holiday season and consider shopping for gifts the Nature Conservancy of Canada (NCC) is trying to relieve the pressure and stress. For shoppers looking for practical items to give the nature lovers on their list, NCC has you covered. NCC is launching its 22nd annual Gifts of Canadian Nature. The alternative gift-giving program, offers shoppers a chance to plan meaningful gifts for their loved ones while also helping to help conserve critical habitat for native Canadian species. It's the perfect gift this holiday season. The on-line catalogue makes it easy. Choose from one of nine different species you would like to symbolically protect. Your symbolic gift will help the Nature Conservancy of Canada protect our country's natural spaces and the species they sustain. Native species available this year include: wolf, swift fox, snowy owl, moose, Canada lynx, American badger, and bald eagle. With any purchase of a Gift of Canadian Nature, you will receive a package that includes a full-colour certificate, an impressive 2017 Nature Conservancy of Canada wall calendar showcasing some of the country's most beautiful landscapes, and an eight-page booklet about the species of your choice. New this year, is a paperless gift option. Gifts range from $40.00 to $1,000.00. Charitable tax receipts are issued for all gift purchases. Learn more at www.giftsofnature.ca or by calling toll-free 1-800-465-8005. "These are great gifts for anyone on your list, especially the nature lover and the outdoor enthusiast. Here is a way for people to ensure the gifts they give and receive are unique and memorable. We are offering green ideas to conserve habitat for many species, while saving people time and frustration. Avoid mall line ups, buy local and help the Nature Conservancy of Canada care for our natural spaces and wildlife." Aaron Bilyea, Director of Marketing, Nature Conservancy of Canada. The Nature Conservancy of Canada is Canada's leading not-for-profit private land conservation organization, working to protect our most important natural areas and the plants and animals they sustain. Since 1962, NCC has helped to protect 2.8 million acres (more than 1.1 million hectares) across the country.

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