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Stamford, CT, United States

Sarker M.,Natural State Research Inc.
11AIChE - 2011 AIChE Annual Meeting, Conference Proceedings | Year: 2011

A discussion on energy production from municipal waste plastics using thermal degradation covers the global consumption of crude oil; waste plastics; plastics name and code; alternate sources of energy, e.g., solar, wind hydrogen fuel, biomass fuel, biodiesel, bioethanol, geothermal, and ocean current; carbon and energy content of various fuels; driving an automobile with NSR fuel; cost analysis; and plans and projections. This is an abstract of a paper presented at the 2011 AIChE Annual Meeting (Minneapolis, MN 10/16-21/2011). Source


Sarker M.,Natural State Research Inc.
Energy Engineering: Journal of the Association of Energy Engineering | Year: 2011

The increased demand and high price for energy sources are driving efforts to convert organic compounds into useful hydrocarbon fuels. Although much of this work has focused on biomass, there are strong benefits to deriving fuels from waste plastic material. Waste plastic is abundant and its disposal creates large problems for the environment. Plastic does not break down in landfills, is not easily recycled and degrades in quality during the recycling process, and can produce waste ash, heavy metals, and potentially harmful gas emissions if incinerated at high temperatures. However, chemical processes that can be used to convert plastics into hydrocarbon fuels have unlimited applications in residential and industrial heating, transportation, and electricity generation. These chemical processes are used to break down the long carbon chains found in plastic into the shorter chains found in gasoline or diesel-type fuels.Natural State Research (NSR) has invented a simple and economically viable process to decompose the hydrocarbon polymers of waste plastic into the shorter chain hydrocarbons of liquid fuel (patent pending). The method and principal of the process/production will be discussed. Source


Sarker M.,Natural State Research Inc.
10AIChE - 2010 AIChE Spring Meeting and 6th Global Congress on Process Safety | Year: 2010

Natural State Research Inc (NSR) has developed a new energy source from abundant waste plastic that can be converted to different types of liquid hydrocarbon fuel. This unique NSR fuel can run all kind of combustion engines, as well as any type of generator to produce electricity. The emission released from burning the NSR fuel is much less compared to the current commercial fuel. Since NSR fuel are derived from waste plastic, the fuel to be produced would be at a lower cost compared to fossil fuel. This is an abstract of a paper presented at the 2010 Spring National Meeting (San Antonio, TX, 3/21-25/2010). Source


Sarker M.,Natural State Research Inc.
10AIChE - 2010 AIChE Spring Meeting and 6th Global Congress on Process Safety | Year: 2010

In 2008, 245 million ton of plastics were produced worldwide. The everyday use of plastics results to abundant plastics waste and occupies landfill. The exposure of these waste plastics to air creates many problems to the environment. Natural State Research Inc has developed a simple and economically viable process to remove these waste plastics from landfill and converting them into liquid hydrocarbon material fuels. This is an abstract of a paper presented at the AIChE Ethylene Producers Conference (San Antonio, TX 3/21-25/2010). Source


Patent
Natural State Research Inc. | Date: 2014-03-10

A method for producing a vapor stream from waste plastic comprises providing a waste plastic feedstock into a reactor containing one or more residues produced from a previously heated source of waste plastic, and heating the waste plastic feedstock in the reactor to a temperature from about 125 C. to 500 C. to generate a vapor containing one or more hydrocarbons. The waste plastic feedstock can have a calcium to sodium mass ratio from about 0.0001 to 400 as measured by inductively-coupled plasma (ICP) spectrometry. The catalytic activity in the reactor may be provided through one or more constituent elements in the waste plastic feedstock or the one or more residues produced from the previously heated source of waste plastic.

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