Ottawa, Canada

Natural Resources Canada

www.nrcan.gc.ca
Ottawa, Canada

The Department of Natural Resource Funding , operating under the FIP applied title Natural Resources Canada , is the ministry of the government of Canada responsible for natural resources, energy, minerals and metals, forests, earth science, mapping and remote sensing. It was created in 1995 by amalgamating the now-defunct Departments of Energy, Mines and Resources and Forestry. Natural Resources Canada works to ensure the responsible development of Canada's natural resources, including energy, forests, minerals and metals. NRCan also uses its expertise in earth science to build and maintain an up-to-date knowledge base of our landmass and resources." To promote internal collaboration, NRCan has implemented a departmental wide wiki based on MediaWiki. Natural Resources Canada also collaborates with American and Mexican government scientists, along with the Commission for Environmental Cooperation, to produce the North American Environmental Atlas, which is used to depict and track environmental issues for a continental perspective.Under the Canadian constitution, responsibility for natural resources belongs to the provinces, not the federal government. However, the federal government has jurisdiction over off-shore resources, trade and commerce in natural resources, statistics, international relations, and boundaries. The current Minister of Natural Resources is Greg Rickford as of March 2014.The department is governed by the Resources and Technical Surveys Act, R.S.C., c.R-7 and the Department of Natural Resources Act, S.C. 1994, c. 41."structured along business lines according to types of natural resources and areas of interest." The department currently has these sectors: Canadian Forest Service Corporate Management and Services Sector Earth science Sector Energy Sector Innovation and Energy Technology Sector Minerals and Metals Sector Science and Policy Integration Public Affairs and Portfolio Management Sector Shared Services Office Geographical Names Board of Canada↑ ↑ ↑ Wikipedia.


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Patent
Natural Resources Canada | Date: 2016-11-04

A method and apparatus for direct contact steam generation for a variety of industrial processes including heavy oil recovery, power generation and pulp and paper applications. The steam generation system consists of a combustor and steam generator and is constructed to be operable at elevated pressures. The fuel, at least one oxidant and a fluid supply including water are supplied at pressure to the combustor. Flue gas from the combustor is delivered to the direct contact steam generator at pressure, and upon direct contact with water produces a flue gas stream consisting primarily of steam. This product stream can then be cleansed and used for industrial application. The combustor can be operated with low grade fuel and low quality water with high solids and hydrocarbon contents. The apparatus and method reduce the environmental footprint by reducing air emission, concentrating CO_(2 )to enable capture and reducing clean water requirements.


News Article | May 19, 2017
Site: cleantechnica.com

More than 500 start-ups, from 66 countries, made submissions. Though the Start-up Energy Transition Tech Festival is a German Energy Agency (Dena) initiative, even a casual perusal of literature reveals its international  character. The General Secretary of the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change and Director General of the International Renewable Energy Agency (IRENA) were among the presenters. The list of speakers included representatives from the Rocky Mountain Institute and Hyperloop Technologies. So why didn’t any Canadian energy companies make the top 100? This question must be particularly galling to our government, which has been presented with a list of the top 100 companies as a preparation for the G20 Summit in Hamburg, July 7-8, 2017. I phoned someone at Innovation, Science and Economic Development Canada (ISED), who wondered what this has to do with the Canadian Government. He gave me the phone number for their media department. The person answering suggested I write an email, which they did not answer. On the festival’s homepage, it says “Thank you for being part of Start Up Energy Transition Tech Festival,” but neither of their press contacts responded to my emailed queries. The answers came from an unexpected quarter. Clean Energy Canada suggested I contact Céline Bak of Analytica Advisors,  the co-chair of the Think Tank 20 (T20) taskforce on climate policy and finance. “You’ve uncovered the fact that a baton was dropped. They’re busy with other things and probably don’t have a lot of time to explain why they dropped the baton,” said Bak. “These are important initiatives, but are in early stages.  We are still in the process of building the partnerships that support international recognition programs. “I would call this evidence that we perhaps we don’t have people at Natural Resources Canada, Environment and Climate Change Canada or ISED monitoring this particular file. The process of actually engaging with innovative SMEs  (small and medium-sized enterprises) as part of solutions to climate change is nascent.” “It would be interesting to know to what extent Canada is engaged in multilateral, plural-lateral, or bilateral discussions with the German Energy Agency.” The Germans could also have initiated the contact. They could have approached the Trade Commission at Canada’s embassy in Berlin, or someone like Bak. The French Institute of Intellectual Property asked for her assistance at Cop 21, in Paris. This led to three Canadian firms being recognized with an award. None of these avenues appears to have been used for the Start Up Energy Transition Tech Festival. Bak noticed the phrase “#GET100 for the #G20” at the top of their press release. “This is a G20 initiative,” she said. The G20 has a number of stakeholder engagement groups, identified by a letter plus 20. There is a Civil 20 (C20), Women 20 (W20), Think Tank 20 (T20). Business 20 (B20) was designed to bridge the energy file and private  energy sector. “Large global Canadian firms are not engaged in multilateral processes. If I compare, for example, the engagement of U.K. and French companies in the G20-focused Business 20, it is far greater than Canada’s private sector. I think they should be more engaged because the private sector’s engagement on the climate file is accelerating and this is regardless of which administration is in the White House,”said Bak. “They are accelerating for a number of reasons. Some of it is simply because there are some important disruptive cost curves that we’re going down. We’ve gone down the solar cost curves and the wind cost curves and now we are going down a number of others, including electric vehicles, the technology for self-driving cars and battery technology. Things are accelerating because costs are reducing and, as a result, technologies are becoming disruptive.” “There is also an acceleration because of greater consensus around the science for climate change and the fact there is a carbon budget. It is like a balloon that we can only blow up to a certain point and if we blow it up any more than that it will explode. The impact of it exploding is that we have more than 2 degrees celsius warming and will never be able to attain 1.5.” “This consensus has led to changes in business models. For example, the insurance sector, banking and pension funds are changing.” “There are all kinds of factors causing things to go faster and I think it is really important for large Canadian firms to be involved in multilateral or international initiatives like the B20. It is also important for us to make it possible for small firms to participate in opportunities (like the Start-up Energy Transition Tech Festival) to be vetted and seriously considered.” “We have seen German leadership in the energy transition and renewable energy. They also provide leadership in a number of climate related files, whether that’s innovation, or green finance, or carbon pricing.” She added some Canadian technology “is the best available and therefore should become the basis of GLOBAL standards. I would be just as worried about our not taking the opportunity to do that than whether there are Canadian firms in the #Get100.” Photo credits: Screen shot from  Start Up Energy Transition Tech Page; You Tube Video from Céline Bak, President of Analytica Advisors & co-chair of the Think Tank 20 (T20) taskforce on climate policy and finance – courtesy Analytica Advsiors; Courtesy G20 in Figures, FEDERAL STATISTICAL OFFICE OF GERMANY; Courtesy G20 in Figures, FEDERAL STATISTICAL OFFICE OF GERMANY; Doors of the Hamburg Messe, where the G20 will meet July 7 & 8, 2017 – by Last Hero via Flickr (CC BY SA, 2.0 License) Check out our new 93-page EV report. Join us for an upcoming Cleantech Revolution Tour conference! Keep up to date with all the hottest cleantech news by subscribing to our (free) cleantech daily newsletter or weekly newsletter, or keep an eye on sector-specific news by getting our (also free) solar energy newsletter, electric vehicle newsletter, or wind energy newsletter.


Patent
Natural Resources Canada | Date: 2017-02-08

Disclosed are methods and apparatuses for analysis of synthetic ropes, cords, slings, cables and belts (collectively termed ropes) including but not limited to ropes for bearing loads as well as fibre optic cables. The ropes are provided with one or more elements for magnetic detection, wherein the magnetic detection elements each comprise a metal fibre or an appropriately treated synthetic fibre. The methods and apparatuses encompass detection of induced or residual magnetism or magnetic flux in the magnetic detection element(s), to sense for example lay length and / or damage, breakage or wear of the magnetic detection element(s), indicative of the condition of the rope.


News Article | April 28, 2017
Site: www.marketwired.com

LONDON, ENGLAND--(Marketwired - April 28, 2017) - Nanotechnology has had a multitude of applications: from healthcare to textiles to new consumer gadgets, innovative new uses for nanotechnology are constantly emerging. It has now found a new role, with University of Alberta-based nanotechnology accelerator Ingenuity Lab using it as the basis for the development of a revolutionary new way to clean up oil spills. The system has received a vote of confidence from Natural Resources Canada, with the organization providing $1.7m to fund its ongoing development. Using a carbon-nanotube mesh combined with other minerals and polymers, Ingenuity Lab's system acts as a sponge that attracts and absorbs oil underwater. When it is fully saturated with oil, the mesh is then removed from the water and exposed to heat, electricity or ultraviolet light, causing it to expel the collected oil. The oil spill cleaning system has come a long way in a remarkably short amount of time. Director of Ingenuity Lab Dr Carlo Montemango said his team was able to demonstrate the effectiveness of the membrane approximately a year ago, but is now working on developing a large-scale version of the system. "Where you might see it is being rolled off the back [of a vessel] and dragged or moved through the water. As it becomes saturated, it would be brought on board, the oil would be expelled and it would be redeployed." Past tests have shown the system can be remarkably effective and is capable of cleaning up 100 percent of a spill – even the heavier oil that may be trapped below the surface. The system also recovers the oil, allowing it to be reused and potentially recuperate some of the cost associated with cleaning up a spill. The technology is far more advanced than current methods of containing a spill, which usually involve floating booms and skimming oil from the water's surface. Ingenuity Lab's system would make a substantial difference should the world see another event on the scale of the 2010 Deepwater Horizon disaster, or the Exxon Valdez spill of 1989. This is by no means the first nanotechnology project Ingenuity Lab has worked on. Other projects have looked at capturing carbon emissions, healthcare and agriculture. Montemango said the team is now working on developing a pilot system and beginning field tests in less than two years. "Our mission is to develop solutions to significant societal problems and challenges, and translate those solutions to the marketplace."


Patent
Natural Resources Canada | Date: 2015-03-18

A method and system for improving high excess air combustion system efficiency, including induration furnaces, using a re-routing of flue gas within the system by gas recirculation. Flue gas is drawn from hot system zones including zones near the stack, for re-introduction into the process whereby the heat recovery partially replaces fuel input. At least one pre-combustion drying zone, at least one combustion zone, and at least a first cooling zone exist in these furnaces. At least one exhaust gas outlet is provided to each pre-combustion drying and combustion zone. At least part of the gaseous flow from each system zone exhaust outlet is selectively delivered to an overall system exhaust, the remaining flow being selectively delivered via recirculation to cooling zones. Recirculation flow is adjusted to meet required system temperatures and pressures. The method and system provide efficiency improvements, reducing fuel requirements and greenhouse gas emissions.


Patent
Natural Resources Canada | Date: 2015-06-01

Provided is a process for recovering metals from solid radioactive waste, preferably uranium, cesium, mercury, thorium, rare earths or combinations thereof. The process comprises a leaching step and a separation step. The leaching step comprises contacting the solid radioactive waste with an aqueous inorganic acid and a leaching salt to produce a mixture of a metal-rich leachate and a metal-poor waste, which are separated in the separation step. Also provided is a process for recovering metals from solid radioactive waste comprising an attrition step, a leaching step, a washing step, a combination step and a recovery step.


Patent
Natural Resources Canada | Date: 2016-07-21

A firetube scraper device comprising: at least one carriage assembly mounted on the firetube; a drive line and drive means for displacing the carriage assembly longitudinally along the firetube; wherein said carriage assembly surrounding the entire circumference of the firetube and comprising at least one row of scraper fins, each of said scraper fins having an inner surface adapted to frictionally engage an outer firetube surface defined by at least an upper portion of the surface of the firetube exposed to contaminants deposited onto a firetube surface.


Patent
Natural Resources Canada | Date: 2015-03-23

Disclosed are methods and apparatuses for analysis of synthetic ropes, cords, slings, cables and belts (collectively termed ropes) including but not limited to ropes for bearing loads as well as fibre optic cables. The ropes are provided with one or more elements for magnetic detection, wherein the magnetic detection elements each comprise a metal fibre or an appropriately treated synthetic fibre. The methods and apparatuses encompass detection of induced or residual magnetism or magnetic flux in the magnetic detection element(s), to sense for example lay length and/or damage, breakage or wear of the magnetic detection element(s), indicative of the condition of the rope.


Patent
Natural Resources Canada | Date: 2016-01-13

The present disclosure discusses dodecan-12-olide, and formulations thereof, and its use in detection surveys of, and in mitigation methods for, Emerald Ash Borer beetle infestations of Ash trees.


Patent
Natural Resources Canada | Date: 2016-08-31

The present disclosure discusses dodecan-12-olide, and formulations thereof, and its use in detection surveys of, and in mitigation methods for, Emerald Ash Borer beetle infestations of Ash trees.

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