Entity

Time filter

Source Type


Shi G.,CAS Nanjing Institute of Geology and Palaeontology | Shi G.,University of Chinese Academy of Sciences | Zhou Z.,CAS Nanjing Institute of Geology and Palaeontology | Xie Z.,Natural History Museum of Guangxi Zhuang Autonomous Region
American Journal of Botany | Year: 2012

Premise of the Study: Calocedrus is among the genera with a typical eastern Asian-western North American disjunct distribution today. The origin of its modern distribution pattern can be better understood by examining its fossil record. • Methods: The present article reports for the first time a new fossil species of this genus based on compressed material from the Oligocene Ningming Formation of Guangxi, South China, in its present major distribution area in eastern Asia. • Key Results: Calocedrus huashanensis sp. nov. is most similar to the two extant eastern Asian species, C. macrolepis and C. formosana, in gross morphology of foliage shoots and bears a close resemblance to the latter in cuticle structure. It shows a general similarity to the North American fossil representatives of the genus in alternately branched foliage shoots but is clearly different from the European Paleogene species characterized by oppositely branched leafy shoots. • Conclusions: This discovery provides new evidence for the floristic exchange of this genus between eastern Asia and North America before the Oligocene (most likely in the Eocene), presumably via the Bering land bridge. The flattened leafy shoots and dimorphic leaves with thin cuticle, open stomatal pits, and shallowly sunken guard cells of the present fossils suggest a rather humid climate during the Oligocene in the Ningming area, South China. © 2012 Botanical Society of America. Source


He L.,Hubei University | Wang Y.,Hubei University | Woods A.,California State University, Fullerton | Li G.,Hubei University | And 2 more authors.
Palaios | Year: 2013

Abundant calcareous tubeworms have been found in both shallow platform and deep basin deposits after the end-Permian mass extinction in the Cili area, South China. Tubeworms from the microbialites deposited on the shallow platform appear to be cone-shaped tubes with diameters ranging from 0.5 to 1.8 mm (mean 1.1 mm), while those attached to Claraia, the most abundant bivalve fossil preserved in the deep basin deposits after the mass extinction, are planispiral tubes with smaller diameters (0.5-1.5 mm, mean 0.9 mm). The calcareous tubeworms are identified as Microconchida (Tentaculita) according to the typical laminated sheet texture of the tubeworms found on the shallow platform. The difference in morphology between the cone-shaped tubeworms found in the microbialites and the planispiral tubeworms attached to Claraia in deeper water deposits may be related to differences in how fast the surrounding sediments were accumulating. Bacterially mediated precipitation of calcium carbonate led to rapid accumulation of the microbialites that forced the tubeworms to grow upward so as to keep up with the rate of microbialite growth and led to the cone-shaped tubes found there, whereas the slowly accumulating sediments surrounding the tubeworm-encrusted Claraia led to the development of the planispiral forms in basin deposits. Calcareous tubeworms found in the shallow platform and colonizing the shells of bivalve Claraia in basin deposits indicates calcareous tubeworms, as a significant disaster form, should have benefited from the opening of ecological space by the extinction of most marine invertebrates. Widespread oceanic anoxia has long been considered to be one of the extraordinary conditions after the end-Permian mass extinction. Tubeworm fossils flourishing in basin deposits within the short interval near the Permian-Triassic boundary implies that the deepwater environment immediately after the end-Permian mass extinction may not have been as anoxic as previously thought. Copyright © 2012, SEPM (Society for Sedimentary Geology). Source


He L.,Hubei University | Wang Y.,Hubei University | Woods A.,California State University, Fullerton | Li G.,Hubei University | And 2 more authors.
Global and Planetary Change | Year: 2013

Widespread oceanic anoxia has been consistently considered as a main characteristic of the oceanic environment after the end-Permian mass extinction. However, newly obtained pyrite framboid data suggest otherwise from a deep shelf setting (Changtanhe section) of northwestern Hunan province in South China. Our results reveal that an oxygenation event occurred immediately after the end-Permian mass extinction in this section, where the redox conditions of bottom water changed from lower dysoxic to upper dysoxic during the Permian-Triassic (P/Tr) transition. The oxygenation event likely resulted from mixing of deep dysoxic bottom waters with shallow, oxygenated waters triggered by enhanced upwelling and seawater circulation as well as the large regression during the P/Tr transition. These may also be the cause of the partial remission of dysoxic conditions immediately after the end-Permian mass extinction in other deep shelf settings, especially in South China. © 2012 Elsevier B.V. Source


Chen G.J.,Natural History Museum of Guangxi Zhuang Autonomous Region | Chang M.,CAS Institute of Vertebrate Paleontology and Paleoanthropology
Science China Earth Sciences | Year: 2011

Here we describe †Huashancyprinus robustispinus, gen. et sp. nov, a fossil cyprinin fish from the Oligocene of Ningming Basin, Guangxi, South China. It differs from all other cyprinin fishes in the following apomorphic characters: extremely robust last unbranched dorsal and anal fin rays with very fine serrations along posterior edge, the crowns of pharyngeal teeth A2 and A3 with a number of deep grooves on the lateral wall, rather large A3, and relatively deep infraorbital 2. Among the members of the Tribe Cyprinini sensu stricto, it mostly resembles the extant genus Cyprinus, particularly to species Cyprinus micristius and C. fuxianensis, which are restricted to Yunnan, southwestern China. The discovery of the cyprinin †Huashancyprinus from southern China, along with the previously known late Eocene †Cyprinus maomingensis, indicates an early branching of the Cyprininae (Cyprinidae) in this area. © 2011 Science China Press and Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg. Source


Shi G.,CAS Nanjing Institute of Geology and Palaeontology | Shi G.,University of Chinese Academy of Sciences | Zhou Z.,CAS Nanjing Institute of Geology and Palaeontology | Xie Z.,Natural History Museum of Guangxi Zhuang Autonomous Region
Review of Palaeobotany and Palynology | Year: 2010

Cephalotaxus ningmingensis sp. nov. is described from the Oligocene Ningming Formation of Guangxi, South China on the basis of leafy shoots and detached leaves with well preserved cuticle. This is the first fossil record of Cephalotaxus in the low latitude tropical area. The new species has been compared with living and other fossil species hitherto described of the genus. It is most similar to the living Cephalotaxus oliveri Masters and Cephalotaxus bonseri (Knowlton) Chaney et Axelrod from the Miocene of Spokane, North America in leaf gross morphology and epidermal characters. A cladistic analysis based on epidermal characters is made for all described fossil species of the genus Cephalotaxus, with Thomasiocladus zamioides Florin, which is believed to be the earliest reliable fossil of Cephalotaxaceae, as an out-group. The analysis shows that fossil species of Cephalotaxus may be divided into three phylogenetic groups and the group containing C. ningmingensis is basal in the genus. The presence of the epiphyllous fungus Callimothallus pertusus Dilcher on leaves of C. ningmingensis likely indicates a humid climate during the Oligocene in Guangxi. © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved. Source

Discover hidden collaborations