Guangxi Museum of Natural History

Nanning, China

Guangxi Museum of Natural History

Nanning, China
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Chen Y.F.,Guangxi Museum of Natural History | Wong W.O.,CAS Institute of Botany | Wong W.O.,CAS Nanjing Institute of Geology and Palaeontology | Hu Q.,Guangxi Museum of Natural History | And 2 more authors.
Phytotaxa | Year: 2017

Acer ningmingensis Y.F.Chen & W.O.Wong sp.nov. is described for asymmetric samaras from the Oligocene Ningming Formation in Guangxi Zhuang Autonomous Region, South China. It represents the Oligocene Acer occurrence in the lowest latitude and the only record from a tropical zone today. Together with the coeval fossil record from the mid-latitudes in China, Korea and Japan, the present discovery suggests that the genus Acer had been widely distributed in East Asia by the Oligocene, during which the climate in the Ningming area was cooler than the present. © 2017 Magnolia Press.


Chen Y.,Guangxi Museum of Natural History | Manchester S.R.,University of Florida
PLoS ONE | Year: 2015

Deviacer guangxiensis Chen & Manchester sp. nov. is described based on asymmetric samaras from the Oligocene Ningming Formation in Guangxi, South China, representing the first documentation of Deviacer fossils in Asia. The Oligocene species, with relatively large fruits, represents the youngest record of the genus so far known; all other records are from the Paleocene and Eocene, or late Eocene-early Oligocene in western North America and Europe. It indicates that the extinct genus, Deviacer, was widely distributed in the northern hemisphere during the Paleogene. © 2015 Chen, Manchester.This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.


PubMed | University of Florida and Guangxi Museum of Natural History
Type: Journal Article | Journal: PloS one | Year: 2015

Deviacer guangxiensis Chen & Manchester sp. nov. is described based on asymmetric samaras from the Oligocene Ningming Formation in Guangxi, South China, representing the first documentation of Deviacer fossils in Asia. The Oligocene species, with relatively large fruits, represents the youngest record of the genus so far known; all other records are from the Paleocene and Eocene, or late Eocene-early Oligocene in western North America and Europe. It indicates that the extinct genus, Deviacer, was widely distributed in the northern hemisphere during the Paleogene.

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