Natural Heritage Section

Union Springs, AL, United States

Natural Heritage Section

Union Springs, AL, United States
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Barger T.W.,Natural Heritage Section | Holt B.D.,Natural Heritage Section | Derry L.,Old Cahawba Archaeological Park | Matthews J.,Old Cahawba Archaeological Park
Southeastern Naturalist | Year: 2014

The Old Cahawba Forever Wild Tract (OCFWT) is a 1216-ha property that was acquired by the State of Alabama Forever Wild Program in August 2009. The OCFWT is characterized by Black Belt prairie pockets, upland dry/calcareous forest, Pinus taeda (Loblolly Pine) plantations, and bottomland/floodplain forest. The property lies 14 km southwest of Selma, AL, and is bordered to the northeast by the Cahaba River. The site is managed by the Alabama Department of Conservation and Natural Resources with an emphasis on recreational use and habitat management. An intensive floristic study of this area was conducted from January 2010 through July 2013. A total of 691 taxa (690 species) from 411 genera and 139 families were collected, with 280 taxa being county records. Asteraceae was the most-collected family with 74 species. Poaceae, Fabaceae, and Cyperaceae were the next most-represented families with 63, 57, and 29 species, respectively. Quercus was the most-collected genus, represented by 13 species and two named hybrids. One hundred and thirty-three non-native species were collected during the surveys. One introduced species, Oxalis brasiliensis G. Lodd, was determined to be a North American record. Plant collections were deposited at the Alabama Natural Heritage Section Herbarium (ALNHS), with duplicates deposited at the Anniston Museum of Natural History Herbarium (AMAL), Jacksonville State University Herbarium (JSU), and Auburn University Herbarium (AUA).


Barger T.W.,Natural Heritage Section | Spaulding D.D.,Anniston Museum of Natural History | Holt B.D.,Natural Heritage Section
Castanea | Year: 2013

The Perdido River Forever Wild Tract (PRFWT) is a contiguous 7,365-ha property that was acquired through multiple purchases by the State of Alabama's Forever Wild Program in December 2006. The PRFWT lies 48 km east-northeast of Mobile, Alabama, 56 km northwest of Pensacola, Florida, and is bound on the east by the Perdido River. The site is managed by the Alabama Department of Conservation and Natural Resources as a nature preserve and wildlife management/recreational area. An intensive floristic study of this area was conducted from October 2007 through June 2012. A total of 721 taxa (713 different species, including five hybrids) from 371 genera and 122 families were collected with 95 taxa representing county records. One state record species was also collected. Asteraceae was the most collected family, with 127 species. Poaceae, Fabaceae, and Cyperaceae were the next largest families with 74, 54, and 39 species, respectively. Quercus was the largest genus represented with 15 species. Eighty-four nonnative species were collected during the surveys. Plant collections were deposited at the Alabama Natural Heritage Section Herbarium (ALNHS) and Anniston Museum of Natural History/Jacksonville State University Herbarium (JSU), with replicates and duplicates deposited at the University of Alabama Herbarium (UNA), Auburn University Herbarium (AUA), and Troy University Herbarium (TROY). © 2013 Southern Appalachian Botanical Society.


Graham S.P.,31 Funchess Hall | Soehren E.C.,Natural Heritage Section | Cline G.R.,Jacksonville State University | Schmidt C.M.,31 Funchess Hall | And 4 more authors.
Herpetological Conservation and Biology | Year: 2011

Hellbenders (Cryptobranchus alleganiensis) historically occurred in large numbers in the eastern United States, but they have undergone a considerable decline due to habitat modification and its subsequent effects on stream quality. To evaluate the Hellbender's current status in Alabama, we verified several recent anecdotal sightings of Hellbenders, and conducted 355 person hours of surveys and 31 trap nights in most historical collection localities and at several additional sites that we considered suitable for this species. We failed to find any Hellbenders during our survey. If Hellbenders still exist in Alabama, they represent relict populations that occur in very low population densities, and likely will be extirpated from the state in the near future. The apparent decline and possible extirpation of Hellbenders in Alabama is probably related to degradation of habitat and water quality resulting from large scale impoundments and land use patterns. As such, land use and water utilization practices will likely persist, and we recommend that conservation efforts intended for this species in Alabama be focused on other species, or on other areas of this species' range where conservation success is more feasible. © 2011. Stephen De Lisle. All Rights Reserved.


Barger T.W.,Natural Heritage Section | Holt B.D.,Natural Heritage Section
Southeastern Naturalist | Year: 2010

The Indian Mountain Forever Wild Tract (IMFWT) is a 240-ha property that was acquired in two purchases by the State of Alabama Forever Wild Program on 18 September 1997 and 31 December 2001. The IMFWT lies 55 km east of Gadsden, AL, and is in the Terrapin Creek watershed, a tributary of the Coosa River. The Alabama Department of Conservation and Natural Resources manages the site with an emphasis on recreational use and habitat management. An intensive floristic study of this area was conducted from March 2007 through May 2008. A total of 431 taxa (430 species) from 281 genera and 103 families were collected, with 157 taxa being county records. Asteraceae was the most-collected family, with 73 species. Poaceae, Fabaceae, and Cyperaceae were the families with the next highest numbers of taxa found (40, 28, and 17 species, respectively). Quercus was the most-represented genus, with 11 taxa. Fifty non-native species were collected during the surveys. Plant collections were deposited at the Anniston Museum of Natural History Herbarium, with duplicates deposited at the University of Alabama Herbarium (UNA), Auburn University Herbarium (AUA), and Troy University Herbarium (TROY).

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