San Donato Milanese, Italy
San Donato Milanese, Italy

Time filter

Source Type

Risso F.M.,slini Childrens University Hospital | Sannia A.,slini Childrens University Hospital | Gavilanes D.A.W.,Maastricht University | Vles H.J.,Maastricht University | And 6 more authors.
Journal of Maternal-Fetal and Neonatal Medicine | Year: 2012

Objective: There is growing evidence on the usefulness of biomarkers in the early detection of preterm infants at risk for brain damage. However, among different tools Activin A, S100B protein and adrenomedullin assessment offer the possibility to investigate brain/multiorgan function and development. This could be especially useful in perinatal medicine that requires even more non-invasive techniques in order to fulfill the minimal handling in diagnostic and therapeutic strategy performance. Materials and methods: The concept of Unconventional Biological Fluid (UBF: urine and saliva) is becoming even stronger and regards the assessment in non-invasive biological fluids of biochemical markers involved in the cascade of events leading to brain damage. Results: Activin A, S100B protein and adrenomedullin in UBF were increased in preterm newborns developing brain damage and/or ominous outcome. Conclusions: The present manuscript offers an update on the usefulness of Activin A, S100B protein an adrenomedullin in UBF as brain damage markers. The findings open a new cue on the use of these markers in daily neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) activities. © 2012 Informa UK, Ltd.


Sannia A.,University of Genoa | Risso F.M.,University of Genoa | Serpero L.D.,University of Genoa | Frulio R.,University of Genoa | And 5 more authors.
Clinica Chimica Acta | Year: 2010

Background: Maternal glucocorticoid (GC) treatment is widely used to prevent lung immaturity in preterm infants. There is growing evidence that GCs may be detrimental to the Central Nervous System (CNS). We investigated whether antenatal GC administration affects CNS function in a dose-dependent manner by measuring urine concentrations of a well-established brain damage marker, S100B. Methods: We conducted a case-control-study in 70 preterm infants (1 GC vs 1 control) whose mothers received a complete GC-course (GC2, n=16), half-course (GC1, n=19), and controls (n=35). At four predetermined time-points, in the first 72. h from birth, we assessed S100B urine concentrations, using a commercially available immunoluminometric assay (Lia-mat Sangtec 100, AB Sangtec Medical, Bromma, Sweden). Data were correlated with primary neonatal outcomes (incidence of respiratory distress syndrome, length of ventilatory support and hospital stay, incidence of intraventricular hemorrhage, adverse 7th day neurological follow-up and neonatal death). Results: S100B in GC2 group at all monitoring time-points was significantly lower (P <0.01) than controls and GC1 group, while no differences (P >0.05) were evident between controls and GC1 group. No significant differences (P >0.05) were shown in primary outcomes between half or complete GC-course treated groups. Conclusion: S100B levels of infants antenatally treated with GCs differed in a dose-dependent manner. Data on primary outcomes suggest that lowering antenatal GC-course may be less detrimental for brain without affecting lung maturation. Further clinical trials are needed to elucidate the low GC-course issue. © 2010 Elsevier B.V.


Florio P.,University of Siena | Abella R.,nato Milanese University Hospital | Marinoni E.,University of Rome La Sapienza | Di Iorio R.,University of Rome La Sapienza | And 8 more authors.
Frontiers in Bioscience - Scholar | Year: 2010

Hypoxia-ischemia constitutes a risk in infants by altering cerebral blood flow regulatory mechanisms and causing loss of cerebral vascular auto-regulation. Hypotension, cerebral ischemia, and reperfusion are the main events involved in vascular auto-regulation leading to cell death and tissue damage. These dramatic phenomena represent a common repertoire in infants complicated by perinatal acute or chronic hypoxia. To date, despite accurate perinatal and intra-operative monitoring, the post-insult period is crucial, since clinical symptoms and monitoring parameters may be of no avail and therapeutic window for pharmacological intervention (6-12 hours) may be limited, at a time when brain damage is already occurring. Therefore, the measurement of circulating biochemical markers of brain damage, such as vasoactive agents and nervous tissue peptides is eagerly awaited in clinical practice to detect high risk infants. The present review is aimed at investigating the role as circulating biochemical markers such as adrenomedullin, S100B, activin A, neuronal specific enolase (NSE), glial fibrillary acid protein (GFAP), in the cascade of events leading to ischemia reperfusion injury in infants complicated by perinatal asphyxia.


Serpero L.D.,University of Genoa | Frigiola A.,nato Milanese University Hospital | Gazzolo D.,nato Milanese University Hospital | Gazzolo D.,C Arrigo Childrens Hospital
Early Human Development | Year: 2012

Mother milk is widely accepted to be a unique product believed to contain biological factors involved in the regulation of newborn optimal growth including brain when compared to milk-formula milks. In this setting, there is growing evidence that in milk-formula neuro-oxidative stress biomarkers, neurotrophic proteins and calcium binding proteins, known to be involved in a cascade of events leading to brain, cardiac and vascular development/damage, are to date lacking or at a lower concentration than breast milk.Therefore, this review is aimed at offering additional insights to the role in human milk of some selected biomarkers such as: i) neurotrophic factors such as Activin A; ii) Calcium binding protein such as S100B and, iii) heat shock protein known to be involved in oxidative stress response (namely hemeoxygenase-1, HO-1 or Heat shock Protein 32, HSP32). © 2012 Elsevier Ltd.


Michetti F.,Catholic University | Bruschettini M.,University of Genoa | Frigiola A.,nato Milanese University Hospital | Abella R.,nato Milanese University Hospital | And 7 more authors.
Clinical Biochemistry | Year: 2011

Background: Neurological dysfunction is a key medical concern in professional sportsmen (PSM). We investigated whether saliva S100B concentrations in PSM and healthy controls are modified before and after training. Methods: We conducted a case-control-study in 75 patients (25 PSM vs 50 controls) in which S100B saliva concentrations were expressed as absolute values and percentage of change (%) from samples drawn before (T0) and after (T1) training. Results: No differences (P> 0.05) between groups were found regarding clinical, monitoring and laboratory parameters. S100B both in PSM and controls was higher at T1 when compared to T0 (P< 0.01). In PSM, S100B was higher than controls (P< 0.001) at T0 and T1. S100B% at T0-T1 was higher (P< 0.001) in PSM and in controls and between PSM and controls (P< 0.001). Conclusions: Increased saliva S100B levels in PSM before and after training suggest a paracrine/autocrine protein's role connected to stressing activity, which becomes especially evident in PSMs. © 2010 The Canadian Society of Clinical Chemists.


Sciacca P.,University of Catania | Betta P.,University of Catania | Mattia C.,University of Catania | Volti G.L.,University of Catania | And 4 more authors.
Frontiers in Bioscience - Elite | Year: 2010

The aim of this study was: echocardiographical assessment of cardiac alterations in late-preterm newborns with hypoxic respiratory failure (HRF), and, study serum pentraxin-3 (PTX-3) in relation to the severity of respiratory impairment and to some echocardiographic parameters (i.e. ejection fraction (EF), stroke volume (SV) and cardiac output (CO). We enrolled in this study 40 newborn infants whose 22 (group I) with moderate HRF and 18 (group II) with severe HRF. In group I the mean values of EF, SV and CO were significantly higher than in the group II. Our results showed a significant increase of PTX-3 in group II patients at 24h of life when compared to group I. Taking patients all together (n=40), we found a significant (R=-73) reverse correlation between EF and serum values of PTX-3. PTX-3 in our patients with HRF is affected by the severity of the hypoxic insult and correlate with the cardio-vascular impairment.


Risso F.M.,Nicu G Gaslini Childrens Hospital | Sannia A.,Nicu G Gaslini Childrens Hospital | Gazzolo D.,C Arrigo Childrens Hospital | Gazzolo D.,nato Milanese University Hospital
Journal of Maternal-Fetal and Neonatal Medicine | Year: 2012

The present overview is aimed at reporting the standard primary investigations that are mandatory in preterm and term newborns at admission to neonatal unit in the first hours after birth. Herein, the main neonatal screening tests for early detection of metabolic diseases are described as well as laboratory standard procedures (glycaemia, bilirubin, blood gas, infectious diseases analyses) monitoring parameters (vital signs recordings, blood and transcutaneous gas assessment, blood pressure recordings) and ultrasound pattern (cranial and cardiac). © 2012 Informa UK, Ltd.


Gazzolo D.,C Arrigo Childrens Hospital | Abella R.,nato Milanese University Hospital | Frigiola A.,nato Milanese University Hospital | Giamberti A.,nato Milanese University Hospital | And 8 more authors.
Journal of Maternal-Fetal and Neonatal Medicine | Year: 2010

There is a growing evidence on the use of biomarkers in daily practice both as of markers of brain/multiorgan damage and/or trophic factors. However, among different tools, Activin A, S100B protein, and Hemeoxygenase-1 (HO-1 or Heat Shock Protein 32, HSP32) assessment offer the possibility to investigate brain/multiorgan function and development. This could be especially useful in perinatal medicine that requires even more noninvasive techniques to fulfill the minimal handling diagnostic and therapeutic strategy. In this regard, among different biological fluids, human milk for its unique composition can constitute a wide source of knowledge useful both in clinical daily practice and in research.Therefore, this mini-review reports recent data on the presence and the usefulness of Activin A, S100B protein, and HO-1/HSP32 assessment in human milk as brain/multiorgan development markers. Results open up a new cue on the use of these markers in perinatal medicine as a key protein for investigations focusing on fetal/neonatal development. © 2010 Informa UK, Ltd.


Serpero L.D.,C Arrigo Childrens Hospital | Bellissima V.,C Arrigo Childrens Hospital | Colivicchi M.,C Arrigo Childrens Hospital | Sabatini M.,C Arrigo Childrens Hospital | And 9 more authors.
Journal of Maternal-Fetal and Neonatal Medicine | Year: 2013

In perinatal medicine, there is an emerging interest on the potential usefulness of non-invasive brain biochemical monitoring in infants at risk for brain injury. To date, several biomarkers such as neuro-proteins, calcium binding proteins, oxidative stress markers, vasoactive agents, inflammatory mediators, have been investigated. Results showed that hypoxia insult, under different conditions, triggers a biochemical pathophysiological cascade of events leading to brain damage. In this setting, increased biomarkers concentrations in different biological fluids have been found to correlate with the occurrence of brain damage at short-long term both in preterm and term fetuses/newborns. However, before inclusion of any biomarker in guidelines, USA and European institutions have recently stated a panel of criteria that have to be fulfilled. Therefore, the present review offers an overview of the main biomarkers currently studied in perinatal medicine and their progresses according to institutions' criteria. © 2013 Informa UK Ltd. All rights reserved: reproduction in whole or part not permitted.


Florio P.,University of Siena | Frigiola A.,nato Milanese University Hospital | Battista R.,University of Siena | El Hadi Abdalla A.,University of Siena | And 7 more authors.
Frontiers in Bioscience - Elite | Year: 2010

Activin-A is a protein over-expressed and secreted by the brain after neuronal destruction. We evaluated whether serum activin-A increases in asphyxiated full-term newborns (AFTNs) at risk of hypoxic-ischemicencephalopathy (HIE). 105 consecutive infants (35 affected by perinatal asphyxia due to acute fetal distress; 70 healthy gestational-age matched newborns) underwent cranial assessment and neurologic examination at 12, 24 and 72 hours after birth and, on discharge from the hospital and; activin-A and monitoring laboratory variables assessment at birth. According to the occurrence of HIE within 7-days after birth, AFTNs were subdivided in Group A (n= 20; no/mild HIE with good prognosis) and Group B (n= 15; moderate/severe HIE with a greater risk of neurological handicap). Activin-A was significantly (P less than 0.0001) higher in Groups A and B than controls and highest (P less than 0.001) in Group B. At 0.66 ng/L activin-A achieved a sensitivity of 93.33% and a specificity of 96.63%, respectively, as HIE diagnostic test. These findings show that activin A increased in AFTNs with HIE before the appearance of related signs.

Loading nato Milanese University Hospital collaborators
Loading nato Milanese University Hospital collaborators