National Taiwan Ocean University

www.ntou.edu.tw
Keelung, Taiwan

National Taiwan Ocean University is a national university in Zhongzheng District, Keelung, Taiwan. Wikipedia.

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Patent
Taipei Medical University and National Taiwan Ocean University | Date: 2015-12-14

The invention uses a highly porous MTAM to immobilize yeast cells for bioethanol fermentation, a first in bioethanol production. The invention also optimizes the conditions to prepare MTAM-immobilized cells and evaluates their potential for batch bioethanol fermentation.


News Article | May 11, 2017
Site: www.rdmag.com

A combination of crab shell powder and nanosized silver particles may be the newest approach to halting the spread of malaria. Researchers from the National Taiwan Ocean University believe this non-toxic mixture could both be environmentally friendly and curb the spread of disease-carrying mosquitoes. The researchers found that chitosan—a substance found in the shells of crustaceans—can be used due to its natural strength and it’s abundant in nature, which makes it cost-effective. “This research highlighted that chitosan-fabricated silver nanoparticles are easy to produce, stable over time and can be employed at low dosages to strongly reduce populations of the malaria vector, the Anopheles sundaicus mosquito, without detrimental effects on the predation of natural mosquito enemies, such as goldfishes,” Jiang-Shiou Hwang, of the National Taiwan Ocean University, said in a statement. After crushing and oven-drying the exoskeletons of hydrothermal vent crabs—Xenograpsus testudinatus—the researchers extracted the chitosan and other minerals and mixed it with silver nitrate to produce a solution of silver nanoparticles. They then sprayed the solution over six water reservoirs at the National Institute of Communicable Disease Centre in Coimbatore, India and found that even in small concentrates of the solution killed mosquito larvae and pupa effectively. The researchers found that it had the largest impact during the early stages of mosquito larvae’s development. According to Hwang, the nanosized particles likely pass through the mosquito’s cuticles and into individual cells to then interfere with several physiological processes that are part of the insect’s life cycle. Another benefit of the environmentally sound solution is that it did not have an effect on freshwater goldfish—Carassiu auratus—which feed on mosquito larvae.   The solution also inhibited the growth of several disease-causing bacterium including Bacillus subtilis, Escherichia coli, Klebsiella pneumonia and Proteus vulgaris. Malaria has become a global health issue. According to the study, the latest estimate in 2013 revealed that there were 198 million cases of malaria worldwide and an estimated 584,000 deaths. The majority of deaths occur in children living in Africa, where the World Health Organization estimates a child dies every minute. The study was published in Hydrobiologia


News Article | May 11, 2017
Site: www.eurekalert.org

A non-toxic mixture of chitin-rich crab shell powder and nanosized silver particles could be an environmentally friendly way of curbing the spread of disease-carrying mosquitoes, and malaria in particular. This is according to a series of experiments led by Jiang-Shiou Hwang of the National Taiwan Ocean University. The findings are published in Springer's journal Hydrobiologia. Mosquitoes carry diseases such as malaria, dengue fever, yellow fever, the Zika virus and encephalitis. Despite more than 100 years of research on the subject, malaria remains a global health problem, especially in Sub-Saharan Africa and Asia. In 2013, the number of malaria cases was estimated at 198 million, and the number of malaria-related deaths at 548 000. According to the World Health Organization, one child dies every minute from malaria in Africa. Products such as organophosphates, insect growth regulators, microbial control agents and organic solutions are used in efforts to control mosquito populations and the spread of the disease. Hwang's team turned their attention to chitosan or chitin, a non-toxic natural substance that has been used in wound healing, as drug carriers and in manufacturing membrane water filters and biodegradable food package coating. Chitin is found in animal tissues, such as the exoskeletons of arthropods, bird beaks and insect eggs. It can easily be chemically changed, is quite strong and, because of its abundance in nature, is cost-effective to use. The research team first crushed and oven-dried the exoskeletons of a number of hydrothermal vent crabs (Xenograpsus testudinatus) before extracting the chitin and other minerals. The subsequent creamy-white filtrate was then mixed with silver nitrate (AgNO3) to obtain a brown-yellow solution of silver nanoparticles (AgNP). The solution was sprayed over six water reservoirs at the National Institute of Communicable Disease Centre in Coimbatore in India. Even in small concentrates it killed mosquito larvae and pupa quite effectively. It had the greatest effect during the early stages of the mosquito larvae's development. The solution was also tested in conjunction with freshwater goldfish (Carassiu auratus) that fed on mosquito larvae. The nanoparticle solution did not have any effect on the fish, indicating that it is an environmentally friendly and non-toxic product. It also inhibited the growth of disease-causing bacterial species such as Bacillus subtilis, Escherichia coli, Klebsiella pneumoniae and Proteus vulgaris. "This research highlighted that chitosan-fabricated silver nanoparticles are easy to produce, stable over time, and can be employed at low dosages to strongly reduce populations of the malaria vector, the Anopheles sundaicus mosquito, without detrimental effects on the predation of natural mosquito enemies, such as goldfishes," says Hwang. "It also effectively inhibits important bacterial pathogens." Hwang hypothesizes that the nanosized particles pass through the insect cuticles and into individual cells to then interfere with various physiological processes that are part of a mosquito's life cycle. Reference: Hwang, K.S. (et al). Chitosan-fabricated Ag nanoparticles and larvivorous fishes: a novel route to control the coastal malaria vector Anopheles sundaicus? Hydrobiologia DOI: 10.1007/s10750-017-3196-1


News Article | May 11, 2017
Site: www.chromatographytechniques.com

A non-toxic mixture of chitin-rich crab shell powder and nanosized silver particles could be an environmentally friendly way of curbing the spread of disease-carrying mosquitoes, and malaria in particular. This is according to a series of experiments led by Jiang-Shiou Hwang of the National Taiwan Ocean University. The findings are published in Springer’s journal Hydrobiologia. Mosquitoes carry diseases such as malaria, dengue fever, yellow fever, the Zika virus and encephalitis. Despite more than 100 years of research on the subject, malaria remains a global health problem, especially in Sub-Saharan Africa and Asia. In 2013, the number of malaria cases was estimated at 198 million, and the number of malaria-related deaths at 548,000. According to the World Health Organization, one child dies every minute from malaria in Africa. Products such as organophosphates, insect growth regulators, microbial control agents and organic solutions are used in efforts to control mosquito populations and the spread of the disease. Hwang’s team turned their attention to chitosan or chitin, a non-toxic natural substance that has been used in wound healing, as drug carriers and in manufacturing membrane water filters and biodegradable food package coating. Chitin is found in animal tissues, such as the exoskeletons of arthropods, bird beaks and insect eggs. It can easily be chemically changed, is quite strong and, because of its abundance in nature, is cost-effective to use. The research team first crushed and oven-dried the exoskeletons of a number of hydrothermal vent crabs (Xenograpsus testudinatus) before extracting the chitin and other minerals. The subsequent creamy-white filtrate was then mixed with silver nitrate (AgNO3) to obtain a brown–yellow solution of silver nanoparticles (AgNP). The solution was sprayed over six water reservoirs at the National Institute of Communicable Disease Centre in Coimbatore in India. Even in small concentrates it killed mosquito larvae and pupa quite effectively. It had the greatest effect during the early stages of the mosquito larvae’s development. The solution was also tested in conjunction with freshwater goldfish (Carassiu auratus) that fed on mosquito larvae. The nanoparticle solution did not have any effect on the fish, indicating that it is an environmentally friendly and non-toxic product. It also inhibited the growth of disease-causing bacterial species such as Bacillus subtilis, Escherichia coli, Klebsiella pneumoniae and Proteus vulgaris. “This research highlighted that chitosan–fabricated silver nanoparticles are easy to produce, stable over time, and can be employed at low dosages to strongly reduce populations of the malaria vector, the Anopheles sundaicus mosquito, without detrimental effects on the predation of natural mosquito enemies, such as goldfishes,” says Hwang. “It also effectively inhibits important bacterial pathogens.” Hwang hypothesizes that the nanosized particles pass through the insect cuticles and into individual cells to then interfere with various physiological processes that are part of a mosquito’s life cycle.


News Article | May 12, 2017
Site: www.gizmag.com

Ah, chitin … the cheap and plentiful substance, which occurs naturally in crustacean shells, has already been suggested for use in things like wound dressings, cheaper pharmaceuticals, and even proton-conducting transistors. Now, researchers from the National Taiwan Ocean University have found that when combined with silver, it could also be used to kill malaria-spreading mosquitoes. More specifically, the mixture has been proven effective at killing mosquito larvae, while they're still in the water. Led by Prof. Jiang-Shiou Hwang, the research team started by oven-drying and then crushing the shells of hydrothermal vent crabs, and then extracting chitin and other minerals from them. These were subsequently mixed with silver nitrate, resulting in a solution of chitin-enriched silver nanoparticles. That solution was later sprayed over six water reservoirs at India's National Institute of Communicable Disease Centre. It was found that even in low concentrations, the nanoparticles killed mosquito larvae and pupa very effectively. Hwang believes that this is due to the particles passing through the insects' outer cuticle and into individual cells. There, they "interfere with various physiological processes that are part of a mosquito's life cycle." As a side benefit, the solution was also found to inhibit the growth of dangerous bacteria such as Bacillus subtilis, Escherichia coli, Klebsiella pneumoniae and Proteus vulgaris. When tested on goldfish, however – which feed on mosquito larvae – it was found to have no harmful effect. A paper on the research was recently published in the journal Hydrobiologia.


Home > Press > Can crab shells provide a 'green' solution to malaria? Study shows how a mixture of chitin and silver nanoparticles inhibits growth of mosquito larvae Abstract: A non-toxic mixture of chitin-rich crab shell powder and nanosized silver particles could be an environmentally friendly way of curbing the spread of disease-carrying mosquitoes, and malaria in particular. This is according to a series of experiments led by Jiang-Shiou Hwang of the National Taiwan Ocean University. The findings are published in Springer's journal Hydrobiologia. Heidelberg, Germany and New York, NY | Posted on May 12th, 2017 Mosquitoes carry diseases such as malaria, dengue fever, yellow fever, the Zika virus and encephalitis. Despite more than 100 years of research on the subject, malaria remains a global health problem, especially in Sub-Saharan Africa and Asia. In 2013, the number of malaria cases was estimated at 198 million, and the number of malaria-related deaths at 548 000. According to the World Health Organization, one child dies every minute from malaria in Africa. Products such as organophosphates, insect growth regulators, microbial control agents and organic solutions are used in efforts to control mosquito populations and the spread of the disease. Hwang's team turned their attention to chitosan or chitin, a non-toxic natural substance that has been used in wound healing, as drug carriers and in manufacturing membrane water filters and biodegradable food package coating. Chitin is found in animal tissues, such as the exoskeletons of arthropods, bird beaks and insect eggs. It can easily be chemically changed, is quite strong and, because of its abundance in nature, is cost-effective to use. The research team first crushed and oven-dried the exoskeletons of a number of hydrothermal vent crabs (Xenograpsus testudinatus) before extracting the chitin and other minerals. The subsequent creamy-white filtrate was then mixed with silver nitrate (AgNO3) to obtain a brown-yellow solution of silver nanoparticles (AgNP). The solution was sprayed over six water reservoirs at the National Institute of Communicable Disease Centre in Coimbatore in India. Even in small concentrates it killed mosquito larvae and pupa quite effectively. It had the greatest effect during the early stages of the mosquito larvae's development. The solution was also tested in conjunction with freshwater goldfish (Carassiu auratus) that fed on mosquito larvae. The nanoparticle solution did not have any effect on the fish, indicating that it is an environmentally friendly and non-toxic product. It also inhibited the growth of disease-causing bacterial species such as Bacillus subtilis, Escherichia coli, Klebsiella pneumoniae and Proteus vulgaris. "This research highlighted that chitosan-fabricated silver nanoparticles are easy to produce, stable over time, and can be employed at low dosages to strongly reduce populations of the malaria vector, the Anopheles sundaicus mosquito, without detrimental effects on the predation of natural mosquito enemies, such as goldfishes," says Hwang. "It also effectively inhibits important bacterial pathogens." Hwang hypothesizes that the nanosized particles pass through the insect cuticles and into individual cells to then interfere with various physiological processes that are part of a mosquito's life cycle. For more information, please click If you have a comment, please us. Issuers of news releases, not 7th Wave, Inc. or Nanotechnology Now, are solely responsible for the accuracy of the content.


News Article | May 11, 2017
Site: www.rdmag.com

A combination of crab shell powder and nanosized silver particles may be the newest approach to halting the spread of malaria. Researchers from the National Taiwan Ocean University believe this non-toxic mixture could both be environmentally friendly and curb the spread of disease-carrying mosquitoes. The researchers found that chitosan—a substance found in the shells of crustaceans—can be used due to its natural strength and it’s abundant in nature, which makes it cost-effective. “This research highlighted that chitosan-fabricated silver nanoparticles are easy to produce, stable over time and can be employed at low dosages to strongly reduce populations of the malaria vector, the Anopheles sundaicus mosquito, without detrimental effects on the predation of natural mosquito enemies, such as goldfishes,” Jiang-Shiou Hwang, of the National Taiwan Ocean University, said in a statement. After crushing and oven-drying the exoskeletons of hydrothermal vent crabs—Xenograpsus testudinatus—the researchers extracted the chitosan and other minerals and mixed it with silver nitrate to produce a solution of silver nanoparticles. They then sprayed the solution over six water reservoirs at the National Institute of Communicable Disease Centre in Coimbatore, India and found that even in small concentrates of the solution killed mosquito larvae and pupa effectively. The researchers found that it had the largest impact during the early stages of mosquito larvae’s development. According to Hwang, the nanosized particles likely pass through the mosquito’s cuticles and into individual cells to then interfere with several physiological processes that are part of the insect’s life cycle. Another benefit of the environmentally sound solution is that it did not have an effect on freshwater goldfish—Carassiu auratus—which feed on mosquito larvae.   The solution also inhibited the growth of several disease-causing bacterium including Bacillus subtilis, Escherichia coli, Klebsiella pneumonia and Proteus vulgaris. Malaria has become a global health issue. According to the study, the latest estimate in 2013 revealed that there were 198 million cases of malaria worldwide and an estimated 584,000 deaths. The majority of deaths occur in children living in Africa, where the World Health Organization estimates a child dies every minute. The study was published in Hydrobiologia


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP | Phase: ENV.2013.6.4-3 | Award Amount: 6.53M | Year: 2014

Coastal floods are one of the most dangerous and harmful natural hazards affecting urban areas adjacent to shorelines. Rapid urbanisation combined with climate change and poor governance means a significant increase in the risk of local surface flooding coinciding with high water levels in rivers and high tide or storm surges from the sea, posing a greater risk of devastation to coastal communities. The threats posed need to be addressed not just in terms of flood prediction and control, but taking into account governance and socio-economic issues. PEARL brings together world leading expertise in both the domain of hydro-engineering and risk reduction and management services to pool knowledge and practical experience in order to develop more sustainable risk management solutions for coastal communities focusing on present and projected extreme hydro-meteorological events. The project will examine 7 case studies from across the EU to develop a holistic risk reduction framework that can identify multi-stressor risk assessment, risk cascading processes and strengthen risk governance by enabling an active role for key actors. The research programme links risk and root cause assessment through enhanced FORIN methodology, event prediction, forecast and warning, development of adaptive structural and non-structural strategies and active stakeholder participation. The project aims to develop novel technologies and methods that can improve the early warning process and its components; it builds a pan-European knowledge base gathering real case studies and demonstrations of best practice across the EU to support capacity development for the delivery of cost-effective risk-reduction plans. Additionally, the project provides an interface to relevant ongoing tsunami work: it plugs into global databases, early warning systems and processes at WMO, and contributes to community building, development of guidelines and communication avenues at the global level through IWA.


Lee D.H.,National Taiwan Ocean University
Bioresource Technology | Year: 2011

This investigation examines the possible results of policy support in developed and developing economies for developing algal biodiesel through to 2040. This investigation adopts the Taiwan General Equilibrium Model-Energy for Bio-fuels (TAIGEM-EB) to predict competition among the development of algal biodiesel, bioethanol and conventional crop-based biodiesel. Analytical results show that algal biodiesel will not be the major energy source in 2040 without strong support in developed economies. In contrast, bioethanol enjoys a development advantage relative to both forms of biodiesel. Finally, algal biodiesel will almost completely replace conventional biodiesel. CO 2 reduction benefits the development of the bio-fuels industry. © 2010 Elsevier Ltd.


Patent
Academia Sinica, China and National Taiwan Ocean University | Date: 2016-04-14

The preset invention relates to a new method or composition for treating a gastric ulcer, preventing or treating an infection of H. pylori, particularly multidrug resistant H. pylori, using an antimicrobial peptide, a functional derivate, fragment or variant thereof, wherein the antimicrobial peptide is selected from the group consisting of Epi-1, TPs and combination thereof.

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