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Corcoran P.,National Suicide Research Foundation
International psychogeriatrics / IPA | Year: 2010

Hospital-treated deliberate self harm and suicide among older adults have rarely been examined at a national level. The Irish Central Statistics Office provided suicide and undetermined death data for 1980-2006. The National Registry of Deliberate Self Harm collected data relating to deliberate self harm presentations made in 2006-2008 to all 40 Irish hospital emergency departments. Rates of female suicide among older adults (over 55 years) were relatively stable in Ireland during 1980-2006 whereas male rates increased in the 1980s and decreased in more recent decades. Respectively, the annual male and female suicide and undetermined death rate was 22.1 and 7.6 per 100,000 in 1997-2006. Male and female deliberate self harm was 3.0 and 11.0 times higher at 67.4 and 83.4 per 100,000, respectively. Deliberate self harm and suicide decreased in incidence with increasing age. Deliberate self harm generally involved drug overdose (male: 72%; female 85%) or self-cutting (male: 15%; female 9%). The most common methods of suicide were hanging (41%) and drowning (29%) for men and drowning (39%) and drug overdose (24%) for women. City and urban district populations had the highest rates of hospital-treated self harm. The highest suicide rates were in urban districts. Older Irish adults have high rates of hospital-treated deliberate self harm but below average rates of suicide. Drowning was relatively common as a method of suicide. Restricting availability of specific medications may reduce both forms of suicidal behavior. Source


Meaney S.,National Suicide Research Foundation
Irish medical journal | Year: 2012

The incidence of injury presentations to emergency departments in the Republic of Ireland has not been established. Data were collected relating to all injuries that presented on every eighth day in July-December 2005 to the three hospitals in Cork City. In total, 2,967 injury presentations were recorded. The total, male and female age-adjusted rate of injury presentations was 11,322, 13,933 and 8,550 per 100,000, respectively. The peak male rate was among 15-29 year-olds (26,735 per 100,000), 2.5 times the female rate in the same age range (10,719 per 100,000). The peak female rate was among over 85 year-olds (18,543 per 100,000). Place of injury, activity at time of injury and underlying substance/object causing injury were unspecified for 44%, 46% and 43% of recorded injuries. Improving the recording of injury data needs to be prioritised in Irish emergency departments ideally in conjunction with the development of a national injury surveillance system. Source


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-FP | Phase: HEALTH-2007-4.2-4 | Award Amount: 2.81M | Year: 2008

The implementation of a prevention-oriented injury surveillance in the EU is a major demand towards the Member States in the recent EC Council Recommendations on the prevention of injury and the promotion of safety. Needed in particular are valid and reliable indicators for the array of external causes of injury morbidity, like involved activities, products and mechanisms, and for the most severe consequences of injuries besides death long term and chronic disabilities . Whereas no single EU health statistics fulfills that demand to date, the integration of two existing data sources the prevention-oriented European Injury Database (IDB ) and the routine Hospital Discharge Registers (HDR) is considered the most promising approach to that avail. However, substantial methodological improvement in IDB sampling, research into the operationalization of disability indicators for the HDR, and technological advancement for a streamlined data collection for both data systems are required. The INTEGRIS project aims to provide the necessary research and technology input for the IDB-HDR integration through an evaluated demonstration project in six Member States. This aim links to chapter 4.2 of the call 2007 Responding to EU policy needs in Health Statistics in the field of hospital based injury statistics, 4.2.4: Health Statistics and Rare Events (HEALTH-2007) in particular. The resulting IDB-HDR data model and INTEGRIS prototype shall meet the statistical quality criteria of Eurostat (European Statistical System) and the public health requirements of the EU Health Indicators (ECHI ). A successful evaluation provided, an EU-level implementation plan will be proposed for adoption by the relevant stakeholders and decision makers.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: MC-ITN | Phase: FP7-PEOPLE-2012-ITN | Award Amount: 3.69M | Year: 2013

MARATONE is a Marie Curie Initial Training Network proposal that directly addresses the need for high-level training and career pathways in mental health to increase the inter-sectorial and trans-national employability of young scientists in the academic, public and private sectors to meet the enormous challenge of the 2009 EU Parliament Resolution on Mental Health. The Resolution set out recommendations for a comprehensive and integrated mental health strategy for Europe. MARATONE is designed to address the biggest challenge to implementing this ambitious strategy: the lack of training for career pathways for young scientists in multidisciplinary mental health research. MARATONE is built on the innovative theoretical premise of horizontal epidemiology, the view that psychosocial difficulties associated with mental health disorders are not exclusively determined by the diagnosis of the particular disorder in a vertical, silo-like pattern but horizontally in a manner that reflects commonalities in the lived experience of people with diverse mental health problems. Grounded in this theoretical foundation, MARATONEs multidisciplinary network of partners will collaboratively develop methodologies for measuring the individual and social impact of mental health disorders, so as to create strategies for the social and private sector responses to mental ill health in the form of health promotion and prevention programmes, and at the national level, strategies for human rights protections in policies and programming. The consortium will provide young researchers with scientific expertise in mental health, as well as basic technical and communication skills, including research development and management, international human rights commitments, and commercial exploitation and dissemination.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-FP | Phase: HEALTH-2007-3.3-4 | Award Amount: 3.84M | Year: 2008

Suicide is a serious public health problem in the EU calling for effective interventions. The aim of this project is to provide EU member states with an evidence based prevention concept, concrete materials and instruments for running and evaluating these interventions and recommendations for the proper implementation of the intervention. These aims will be achieved by the following objectives: > Analysis of differences in suicide rates among European countries and harmonisation of procedures for definition, assessment and evaluation of suicidality > Development of a state of the art intervention concept for the prevention of suicidality that considers current evidence-based best practices and international experiences with multilevel interventions, such as that of the European Alliance Against Depression > Implementation of comparable multilevel community based prevention interventions in four European model regions > Evaluation of the interventions in a pre-post, controlled and cross-nationally comparable design concerning effectiveness with respect to both suicides and non-fatal suicidal acts, efficiency (including health economic evaluations), involved processes and finally the interplay between the single intervention measures > Distribution of an optimised suicide preventive intervention concept, corresponding materials and instruments, and recommendations for implementation to policy makers and stakeholders

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