National Scientific Center Institute of Experimental and Clinical Veterinary Medicine

Kharkiv, Ukraine

National Scientific Center Institute of Experimental and Clinical Veterinary Medicine

Kharkiv, Ukraine

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Filatov S.,National Scientific Center Institute of Experimental and Clinical Veterinary Medicine | Szadziewski R.,University of Gdansk
Journal of Natural History | Year: 2017

Despite the great socio-economic impact of Culicoides-borne diseases, there is little work on the reassessment of the faunistic and distributional data on this important group of vectors in the territory of Ukraine. Along with the literature review, materials were collected and slide-mounted using the conventional techniques for this study. The revised and commented list of 55 valid species names of the genus Culicoides recorded from Ukraine and their distribution is presented. New collection localities are given for Culicoides griseidorsum Kieffer, Culicoides atripennis Shevchenko and Culicoides newsteadi s.l. Culicoides triangulatus Shevchenko and Culicoides ukrainensis Shevchenko described from Ukraine are recognized as nomina dubia, whereas Culicoides tentorius Austen and Culicoides furcillatus Callot, Kremer and Paradis were excluded from the list. The current state of knowledge on Ukrainian Culicoides fauna should be characterized as rather understudied. Collectively, this suggests that further research efforts are needed, especially in view of the fact that the species recognized as vectors of the economically important diseases of animals are among the most abundant representatives of the genus. Moreover, the article highlights taxonomic problems within certain taxa and provides an outline of its further research perspectives. © 2017 Informa UK Limited, trading as Taylor & Francis Group.


Rola-Luszczak M.,National Veterinary Research Institute | Pluta A.,National Veterinary Research Institute | Olech M.,National Veterinary Research Institute | Donnik I.,Urals State Scientific Research Institute of Veterinary Medicine | And 5 more authors.
PLoS ONE | Year: 2013

Recent studies have shown that bovine leukemia virus (BLV) sequences can be classified into seven distinct genotypes based on full gp51 sequence. This classification was based on available sequence data that mainly represented the BLV population that is circulating in cattle from the US and South America. In order to aid with a global perspective inclusion of data from Eastern Europe is required. In this study we examined 44 BLV isolates from different geographical regions of Poland, Belarus, Ukraine, and Russia. Phylogenetic analysis based on a 444bp fragment of env gene revealed that most of isolates belonged to genotypes 4 and 7. Furthermore, we confirmed the existence of a new genotype, genotype 8, which was highly supported by phylogenetic computations. A significant number of amino acid substitutions were found in the sequences of the studied Eastern European isolates, of which 71% have not been described previously. The substitutions encompassed mainly the C-part of the CD4+ epitope, zinc binding peptide region, CD8+ T cell epitope, and overlapping linear epitope E. These observations highlight the use of sequence data to both elucidate phylogenetic relationships and the potential effect on serological detection of geographically diverse isolates. © 2013 Rola-Łuszczak et al.


PubMed | National Diagnostic Research Veterinary Medical Institute, National Agricultural Laboratory of Sao Paulo, Exotic and Emerging Avian Viral Diseases Research Unit, National Scientific Center Institute of Experimental and Clinical Veterinary Medicine and 3 more.
Type: Journal Article | Journal: PloS one | Year: 2016

Our study demonstrates the repeated isolation of vaccine-derived Newcastle disease viruses from different species of wild birds across four continents from 1997 through 2014. The data indicate that at least 17 species from ten avian orders occupying different habitats excrete vaccine-derived Newcastle disease viruses. The most frequently reported isolates were detected among individuals in the order Columbiformes (n = 23), followed in frequency by the order Anseriformes (n = 13). Samples were isolated from both free-ranging (n = 47) and wild birds kept in captivity (n = 7). The number of recovered vaccine-derived viruses corresponded with the most widely utilized vaccines, LaSota (n = 28) and Hitchner B1 (n = 19). Other detected vaccine-derived viruses resembled the PHY-LMV2 and V4 vaccines, with five and two cases, respectively. These results and the ubiquitous and synanthropic nature of wild pigeons highlight their potential role as indicator species for the presence of Newcastle disease virus of low virulence in the environment. The reverse spillover of live agents from domestic animals to wildlife as a result of the expansion of livestock industries employing massive amounts of live virus vaccines represent an underappreciated and poorly studied effect of human activity on wildlife.


Reeves A.B.,U.S. Geological Survey | Poulson R.L.,University of Georgia | Muzyka D.,National Scientific Center Institute of Experimental and Clinical Veterinary Medicine | Ogawa H.,Obihiro University of Agriculture and Veterinary Medicine | And 6 more authors.
Infection, Genetics and Evolution | Year: 2016

Avian paramyxovirus serotype 4 (APMV-4) is a single stranded RNA virus that has most often been isolated from waterfowl. Limited information has been reported regarding the prevalence, pathogenicity, and genetic diversity of AMPV-4. To assess the intercontinental dispersal of this viral agent, we sequenced the fusion gene of 58 APMV-4 isolates collected in the United States, Japan and the Ukraine and compared them to all available sequences on GenBank. With only a single exception the phylogenetic clades of APMV-4 sequences were monophyletic with respect to their continents of origin (North America, Asia and Europe). Thus, we detected limited evidence for recent intercontinental dispersal of APMV-4 in this study. © 2015.


Muzyka D.,National Scientific Center Institute of Experimental and Clinical Veterinary Medicine | Pantin-Jackwood M.,U.S. Department of Agriculture | Stegniy B.,National Scientific Center Institute of Experimental and Clinical Veterinary Medicine | Rula O.,National Scientific Center Institute of Experimental and Clinical Veterinary Medicine | And 11 more authors.
Applied and Environmental Microbiology | Year: 2014

Despite the existence of 10 avian paramyxovirus (APMV) serotypes, very little is known about the distribution, host species, and ecological factors affecting virus transmission. To better understand the relationship among these factors, we conducted APMV wild bird surveillance in regions of Ukraine suspected of being intercontinental (north to south and east to west) flyways. Surveillance for APMV was conducted in 6,735 wild birds representing 86 species and 8 different orders during 2006 to 2011 through different seasons. Twenty viruses were isolated and subsequently identified as APMV-1 (n=9), APMV-4 (n=4), APMV-6 (n-3), and APMV-7 (n=4). The highest isolation rate occurred during the autumn migration (0.61%), with viruses isolated from mallards, teals, dunlins, and a wigeon. The rate of isolation was lower during winter (December to March) (0.32%), with viruses isolated from ruddy shelducks, mallards, white-fronted geese, and a starling. During spring migration, nesting, and postnesting (April to August) no APMV strains were isolated out of 1,984 samples tested. Sequencing and phylogenetic analysis of four APMV-1 and two APMV-4 viruses showed that one APMV-1 virus belonging to class 1 was epidemiologically linked to viruses from China, three class II APMV-1 viruses were epidemiologically connected with viruses from Nigeria and Luxembourg, and one APMV-4 virus was related to goose viruses from Egypt. In summary, we have identified the wild bird species most likely to be infected with APMV, and our data support possible intercontinental transmission of APMVs by wild birds. © 2014, American Society for Microbiology.


Muzyka D.,National Scientific Center Institute of Experimental and Clinical Veterinary Medicine | Pantin-Jackwood M.,U.S. Department of Agriculture | Spackman E.,U.S. Department of Agriculture | Smith D.,U.S. Department of Agriculture | And 3 more authors.
Avian Diseases | Year: 2016

Wild bird surveillance for avian influenza virus (AIV) was conducted from 2001 to 2012 in the Azov - Black Sea region of the Ukraine, considered part of the transcontinental wild bird migration routes from northern Asia and Europe to the Mediterranean, Africa, and southwest Asia. A total of 6281 samples were collected from wild birds representing 27 families and eight orders for virus isolation. From these samples, 69 AIVs belonging to 15 of the 16 known hemagglutinin (HA) subtypes and seven of nine known neuraminidase (NA) subtypes were isolated. No H14, N5, or N9 subtypes were identified. In total, nine H6, eight H1, nine H5, seven H7, six H11, six H4, five H3, five H10, four H8, three H2, three H9, one H12, one H13, one H15, and one H16 HA subtypes were isolated. As for the NA subtypes, twelve N2, nine N6, eight N8, seven N7, six N3, four N4, and one undetermined were isolated. There were 27 HA and NA antigen combinations. All isolates were low pathogenic AIV except for eight highly pathogenic (HP) AIVs that were isolated during the H5N1 HPAI outbreaks of 2006-08. Sequencing and phylogenetic analysis of the HA genes revealed epidemiological connections between the Azov-Black Sea regions and Europe, Russia, Mongolia, and Southeast Asia. H1, H2, H3, H7, H8, H6, H9, and H13 AIV subtypes were closely related to European, Russian, Mongolian, and Georgian AIV isolates. H10, H11, and H12 AIV subtypes were epidemiologically linked to viruses from Europe and Southeast Asia. Serology conducted on serum and egg yolk samples also demonstrated previous exposure of many wild bird species to different AIVs. Our results demonstrate the great genetic diversity of AIVs in wild birds in the Azov-Black Sea region as well as the importance of this region for monitoring and studying the ecology of influenza viruses. This information furthers our understanding of the ecology of avian influenza viruses in wild bird species.


PubMed | U.S. Department of Agriculture and National Scientific Center Institute of Experimental and Clinical Veterinary Medicine
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Applied and environmental microbiology | Year: 2014

Despite the existence of 10 avian paramyxovirus (APMV) serotypes, very little is known about the distribution, host species, and ecological factors affecting virus transmission. To better understand the relationship among these factors, we conducted APMV wild bird surveillance in regions of Ukraine suspected of being intercontinental (north to south and east to west) flyways. Surveillance for APMV was conducted in 6,735 wild birds representing 86 species and 8 different orders during 2006 to 2011 through different seasons. Twenty viruses were isolated and subsequently identified as APMV-1 (n = 9), APMV-4 (n = 4), APMV-6 (n = 3), and APMV-7 (n = 4). The highest isolation rate occurred during the autumn migration (0.61%), with viruses isolated from mallards, teals, dunlins, and a wigeon. The rate of isolation was lower during winter (December to March) (0.32%), with viruses isolated from ruddy shelducks, mallards, white-fronted geese, and a starling. During spring migration, nesting, and postnesting (April to August) no APMV strains were isolated out of 1,984 samples tested. Sequencing and phylogenetic analysis of four APMV-1 and two APMV-4 viruses showed that one APMV-1 virus belonging to class 1 was epidemiologically linked to viruses from China, three class II APMV-1 viruses were epidemiologically connected with viruses from Nigeria and Luxembourg, and one APMV-4 virus was related to goose viruses from Egypt. In summary, we have identified the wild bird species most likely to be infected with APMV, and our data support possible intercontinental transmission of APMVs by wild birds.


Szadziewski R.,University of Gdask | Dominiak P.,University of Gdask | Filatov S.,National Scientific Center Institute of Experimental and Clinical Veterinary Medicine
Zootaxa | Year: 2015

Alluaudomyia canariensis Szadziewski & Dominiak sp. nov. from the Canary Islands and A. wyskokensis Szadziewski & Dominiak sp. nov. from Poland and Ukraine are described and illustrated. The genus Alluaudomyia is reported from the Canary Islands for the first time. The article is supplemented with a checklist and an identification key for the species so far recorded from Europe and the Canary Islands.


Limanskaya O.,Ukrainian Academy of Sciences | Limanskaya O.,National Scientific Center Institute of Experimental and Clinical Veterinary Medicine | Limanskii A.,Ukrainian Academy of Sciences | Limanskii A.,Kyoto University
Biophysics (Russian Federation) | Year: 2012

Complexes of bacteriophage T7 RNA polymerase with a DNA template for transcription elongation were visualized by atomic force microscopy. Images for complexes of T7 RNA polymerase with terminal fragments of DNA template were obtained for single molecules. Complexes of a single DNA template molecule with several T7 RNA polymerase molecules corresponding to stages of initiation, elongation and termination of transcription were visualized under the elimination of unspecific DNA-protein binding. Immobilized on the amino mica RNA transcripts form rod-like condensed structures. Detailes of specific and unspecific complex formation for the T7 RNA polymerase-DNA system during initiation and transcription elongation are discussed. © 2012 Pleiades Publishing, Ltd.


PubMed | University of Gdansk and National Scientific Center Institute of Experimental and Clinical Veterinary Medicine
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Zootaxa | Year: 2015

Alluaudomyia canariensis Szadziewski & Dominiak sp. nov. from the Canary Islands and A. wyskokensis Szadziewski & Dominiak sp. nov. from Poland and Ukraine are described and illustrated. The genus Alluaudomyia is reported from the Canary Islands for the first time. The article is supplemented with a checklist and an identification key for the species so far recorded from Europe and the Canary Islands.

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