National Research Laboratory of Dendritic Cell Differentiation and Regulation

South Korea

National Research Laboratory of Dendritic Cell Differentiation and Regulation

South Korea

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Jung I.D.,National Research Laboratory of Dendritic Cell Differentiation and Regulation | Noh K.T.,National Research Laboratory of Dendritic Cell Differentiation and Regulation | Lee C.-M.,National Research Laboratory of Dendritic Cell Differentiation and Regulation | Chun S.H.,National Research Laboratory of Dendritic Cell Differentiation and Regulation | And 7 more authors.
Biochemical and Biophysical Research Communications | Year: 2010

Oncostatin M (OSM) is a pleiotropic cytokine and a member of the gp130/IL-6 cytokine family that has been found to be involved in both pro- and anti-inflammatory responses in cell-mediated immunity. Maturation of dendritic cells (DCs) is crucial for initiation of primary immune responses and is regulated by several stimuli. In this study, the role of OSM in the phenotypic and functional maturation of DCs was evaluated in vitro. Stimulation with OSM upregulated the expression of CD80, CD86, MHC class I and MHC class II and reduced the endocytic capacity of immature DCs. Moreover, OSM induced the allogeneic immunostimulatory capacity of DCs by stimulating the production of the Th1-promoting cytokine IL-12. OSM also increased the production of IFN-γ by T cells in mixed-lymphocyte reactions, which would be expected to contribute to the Th1 polarization of the immune response. The expression of surface markers and cytokine production in DCs was mediated by both the MAPK and NF-κB pathways. Taken together, these results indicate that OSM may play a role in innate immunity and in acquired immunity by enhancing DCs maturation and promoting Th1 immune responses. © 2010 Elsevier Inc.


Jung I.D.,National Research Laboratory of Dendritic Cell Differentiation and Regulation | Jeong Y.-I.,National Research Laboratory of Dendritic Cell Differentiation and Regulation | Lee C.-M.,National Research Laboratory of Dendritic Cell Differentiation and Regulation | Noh K.T.,National Research Laboratory of Dendritic Cell Differentiation and Regulation | And 9 more authors.
International Immunopharmacology | Year: 2010

Indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO), a key enzyme that catalyzes the initial, rate-limiting step in tryptophan degradation, is expressed in dendritic cells (DCs) which are stimulated by lipopolysaccharide (LPS) or interferons. In this study we show that curcumin inhibits IDO expression in vitro and in vivo in DCs, leading to the suppression of LPS-induced DC maturation. The effect of curcumin relative to LPS is not limited to the above, as it also enhances LPS-induced expression of cyclooxygenase (COX)-2 and production of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2). Additionally, PGE2 diminished the LPS-induced IDO expression in DCs, thereby contributing to the inhibition of expression of the surface molecules (CD80, CD86 and MHC class I) and the production of the proinflammatory cytokines (IL-12 p70 and TNF-α) by LPS stimulation. Under our experimental conditions, curcumin plays an immunomodulatory role by downregulating IDO expression via a COX-2/PGE2-dependant pathway, thus impacting DC maturation in vitro and in vivo. © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

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