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Verma P.,Agricultural Research Station | Solanki R.K.,Agricultural Research Station | Solanki R.K.,National Research Center on Seed Spices
Indian Journal of Agricultural Sciences | Year: 2015

Stability of eleven genotypes of fennel (Foeniculum vulgare M) was assessed for yield and component traits based on three years consecutive experimentation, i.e. 2009-2011. Mean square due to environment + (variety × environment) was significant for all the traits except number of umbellets per umbel indicating the existence of genotype × environment interaction. Based on the mean performance, regression coefficient and deviation from regression values, it was found that the stability of yield is imparted in the genotypes, viz. UF 281, AF 1, GF 11, JF 586 2/5, HF 131 and NDF 16 through the stable performance of major yield contributing traits like primary and secondary branches, number of umbels and umbellets, number of seeds/plant and test weight. These genotypes may be useful genetic resources for development of high yielding, stable varieties in fennel. Source


Mishra B.K.,National Research Center on Seed Spices | Nain L.,Indian Agricultural Research Institute
International Journal of ChemTech Research | Year: 2013

Rice straw, amended with poultry manure or urea was composted with a co-inoculum of fungi and bacteria in perforated cemented pits. Microbial activity in terms of FDA hydrolysis, alkaline phosphatase and dehydrogenase was measured at monthly intervals. Microbial activity was highest at 2nd month. Carbon content was lowest at 3rd month while nitrogen was higher at 3rd month. pH and electrical conductivity of the compost was found to be within the desirable limits for its use in crop production at the end of 3rd month of composting. Source


Kakani R.K.,National Research Center on Seed Spices | Sharma Y.,Rajasthan Agricultural University
Sabrao Journal of Breeding and Genetics | Year: 2010

The genetics of yield and related traits was studied in barley (Hordeum vulgare L.) by means of 9 x 9 half diallel (F1 and F2) progenies under four diverse environments. Additive-dominance model was fitted only for days to heading, plant height, flag leaf area, spike length, number of grains per spike, test weight and grain yield per plant for different environments and generations. Both additive (D) and dominance (H1 and H2s) components were significant for all the traits studied. However, the relative magnitude of dominance components was observed to be higher than additive components, which indicated the preponderance of dominance components in controlling the inheritance of characters under study. The (H1/D)1/2 values revealed the existence of over dominance for flag leaf area, number of grains per spike and test weight in F1 generation only, indicating the existence of over dominance. The values of 'F' exhibited an excess of dominant alleles in the parents for days to heading, flag leaf area, spike length, number of grains per spike and test weight. The environmental component 'E' was significant for most of the traits. The average degree of dominance (H1/D)1/2 was in range of over dominance. The ratio of H2/4H1 indicated symmetrically distribution of the genes for flag leaf area, spike length, number of grains per spike, test weight and grain yield per plant in some generations and environments. The value of h2/ H2 was observed less than one in days to heading, plant height, flag leaf area, number of grains per spike, test weight and grain yield per plant in different environments and traits, suggesting the role of dominant genes in controlling the inheritance of these traits, whereas, one gene or group of genes was controlled the inheritance of the remaining characters. The heritability estimates were relatively low to moderately high magnitude for different characters. Heritability estimates were high in F1 in comparison to F2, indicating the degree of heritability was influenced by the environment and generations. Thus, non-conventional breeding methods like recurrent selection by way of inter-mating most desirable segregants followed by selection or diallel selective mating or bi-parental mating in early segregating generations may be followed for improvement in barley. Source


Singh B.,National Research Center on Seed Spices | Solanki R.K.,National Research Center on Seed Spices
Indian Journal of Agricultural Sciences | Year: 2015

The present paper reviews the research and development status of seed spices in India in the last seven decades. Seed spices are one of the important group of spice crops being cultivated in the arid and semi-arid region of the country. These crops are attaining importance day by day due to its aromatic and medicinal values, the present era is reflecting high International demand of Indian seed spices. The research achievements till date have been very concise for developing, numerous high yielding disease resistant or tolerant varieties, efficient production and protection technologies have also been developed during the period. Since 1930, we have gone long way in understanding the basic problems of these crops. The area of research have been focused mainly on designing packages to harvest more, production of better quality and consumer safe produce is yet to come. The ongoing compilation is a brief information of the milestones that has been bagged by the country's scientific and developmental team to sustain these crops. The problems and challenges in the cultivation of seed spices are enormous and each has to be answered with the changing climatic scenario in the time to come. New problems are also coming up in many of the seed spice crops. Cumin and coriander being the pre-dominant seed spice of the group needs more of the attention. The ongoing paper reflects the synchronized events that have happened in the country for seed spices research and development and also mentioning the significant achievements made and technologies which have shown considerable impact in sustaining these high value low volume crops under the hands of seed spice growers. Source


Lal G.,National Research Center on Seed Spices | Singh R.,National Research Center on Seed Spices
Indian Journal of Agricultural Sciences | Year: 2016

An experiment was conducted for the evaluation of coriander (Coriandrum sativum L.) varieties under different organic modules for sustainable production during rabi season of 2009-10 to 2012-13 (four years) at ICAR-National Research Center on Seed Spices, Tabiji, Ajmer, Rajasthan. The experiment was laid out in Factorial Randomized Block Design consisting of three organic modules (M1, M2 and M3) and two varieties Ajmer Coriander-1 (ACr-1, V1) and Rajasthan Coriander-41 (RCr-41, V2) with four replications. Findings of this study showed significant differences among the performance of different organic modules tested for two coriander varieties. Organic module M1 [comprising soil application of vermicompost (5 tonnes/ha), foliar spray of garlic extract (5% @ 2.0 kg/ha) + neem oil (2% @ 5 l/ha, soil application of neem cake (150 kg/ha) and Trichoderma (2.5 kg/ha), seed treatment with Rhizobium (100 ml/kg seed), PSB (100 ml/kg seed) and Trichoderma (10 g/kg seed)] exhibited maximum number of primary branches (8.05/plant), secondary branches (21.88/plant), number of umbels (32.22/plant), number of seeds (8.81/umbellate) and highest seed yield (1323.90 kg/ha) in coriander crop. Similarly, significant differences were recorded in the performance of coriander varieties under different organic modules and the maximum number of primary branches (7.87/plant), secondary branches (21.55/plant), number of umbels (29.20/plant), number of umbellates (5.81/plant) and number of seeds (8.40/umbellate) with earliest flowering (66.05 days after sowing-DAS), and highest seed yield (1296.31 kg/ha) were recorded in coriander variety ACr-1 than that of variety RCr-41. Cultivation of coriander variety ACr-1 with the application of Module-1 exhibited maximum values for all the growth parameters, yield attributing characters with maximum seed yield. Hence, variety ACr-1 is suggested to grow organically with the application of Module-1 (M1) under semi-arid environmental conditions. Source

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