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Naveena B.M.,National Research Center on Meat Chengicherla | Muthukumar M.,National Research Center on Meat Chengicherla | Kulkarni V.V.,National Research Center on Meat Chengicherla | Praveen Kumar Y.,National Research Center on Meat Chengicherla | Usha Rani K.,National Research Center on Meat Chengicherla
Journal of Food Processing and Preservation | Year: 2015

The effect of aging on the physicochemical, textural, microbial and proteome characteristics of emu (Dromaius novaehollandiae) meat was studied under aerobic packaging (AP) and vacuum packaging (VP) conditions at 4±1C for 9 and 15 days, respectively. Improvement (P<0.05) in water-holding capacity, myofibrillar fragmentation index and protein extractability with aging was observed in emu meat cubes under both AP and VP conditions. Reduction (P<0.05) in Warner-Bratzler shear force values was observed on the 6th and 15th day of aging compared with the 0th day in the AP and VP samples, respectively. The sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis analysis revealed the appearance of 30-kDa protein bands, indicating extensive proteolysis on the 6th day and 9th day of aging in the AP and VP samples, respectively. Proteome analysis using two-dimensional gel electrophoresis revealed significant (P<0.01) changes in the number of differentially expressed protein spots in the AP and VP samples during aging. Practical Applications: Emus are classified as ratites along with ostriches and rheas and are becoming increasingly popular as a source of low-fat, low-cholesterol, iron-rich red meat alternative. The emu industry is looking for science-based information in order to successfully produce and market emu meat. The present work provides information on emu meat quality, aging process, ultrastructure, proteome characteristics and microbial changes. This paper also discusses about the different packaging methods and the shelf life of emu meat. Considering the increasing demand for new source of animal proteins around the world, this paper provides significant information to all ostrich, rhea and emu meat processors. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.


Sen A.R.,National Research Center on Meat Chengicherla | Naveena B.M.,National Research Center on Meat Chengicherla | Muthukumar M.,National Research Center on Meat Chengicherla | Vaithiyanathan S.,National Research Center on Meat Chengicherla
Journal of Food Science and Technology | Year: 2014

In our study effect of different end point temperature (51 °C, 65 °C, 71 °C and 79 °C) on physicochemical and storage stability of mutton chops were evaluated. The L*(lightness) value and b*(yellowness) increased (P∈<∈0.05) in cooked mutton chops than the raw mutton. The a*value (redness) decreased (P∈<∈0. 05) as end point temperature increased. As internal cooking temperature increased soluble myoglobin content decreased with a corresponding increase in percent myoglobin denatured. Raw mutton chops (uncooked) had lower level of oxidation (less TBA values) than cooked mutton irrespective of storage length. Initial APC of raw and cooked mutton chops ranged from log 1.75 to log 3.73 and was lower in higher end point cooking temperature. It can be concluded that as end point temperature increased, mutton chops appear less red and raw mutton had lower level of oxidation than cooked mutton chops. © 2011 Association of Food Scientists & Technologists (India).

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