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Faridi F.,Banasthali University | Sena D.S.,National Research Center on Camels | Sharma V.,Banasthali University
Journal of Camel Practice and Research | Year: 2014

In the present study, a total of 4 fresh and 4 frozen camel faecal samples were subjected to DNA isolation and evaluated from three different published protocols and one commercial kit protocol - QIAamp®DNA stool mini kit (Qiagen, GmbH, Hilden, Germany). Camel faecal DNA isolation using QIAamp®DNA stool mini kit was found the best method in terms of its efficiency, easiness and rapidity of the method.


Gupta L.,Maharana Pratap University of Agriculture and Technology | Roy A.K.,National Research Center on Camels | Tiwari G.S.,Maharana Pratap University of Agriculture and Technology | Dhuria R.K.,University of Rajasthan
Livestock Science | Year: 2012

The experiment was conducted using nine dromedary camels of Bikaneri breed averaging 8-9 years age and 583-692kg body weight at National Research Centre on Camels, Bikaner, India. The effect of feeding different levels of leguminous roughages on nutrient intake, draught performance, blood biochemical and physiological parameters in dromedary camels was evaluated using completely randomized design over a period of 60 days. Among the leguminous roughages, groundnut haulms (Arachis hypogaea) and cluster bean straw (Cyamopsis tetragonoloba) were fed in one of three ratios, 75:25, 50:50 and 25:75 in treatments T 1, T 2 and T 3, respectively and concentrate mixture as per requirement of the camels. The dry matter intake (DMI) on percent and metabolic body weight basis did not differ significantly among the treatments. However, digestible crude protein intake (DCPI) was significantly higher in T 1 followed by T 2 and T 3. Likewise, total digestible nutrients intake (TDNI) was higher in T 1 as compared to T 2 and T 3. The nutritive value was significantly higher in camels fed on T 1 as compared to other treatments. The feeding of different levels of groundnut haulms and cluster bean straw influenced the speed of travel and power developed by the camels which was significantly better in T 1 followed by T 2 and T 3. There was significant change in blood biochemical parameters with response to treatments and work. The treatment groups did not show any significant effect on lactate, triglycerides, phosphorus and calcium content of blood in camels before work. There was increase in lactate content in all the treatments manifold times after work. There was significant increase in glucose content when the camels were exposed to work which also differed significantly among the treatment groups. The increase in physiological responses was noted in all the treatments before and after work but the difference was statistically significant for pulse and respiration rates. It has been concluded from the results that feeding of groundnut haulms (Arachis hypogaea) and cluster bean straw (Cyamopsis tetragonoloba) in proportion of 75:25 had beneficial effect as compared to other treatment groups and is recommended for better performance of dromedary camels. However, the cluster bean straw in higher proportions can be used in the ration of dromedary camels with certain roughage improvement practices. © 2012 Elsevier B.V.


Gupta L.,Maharana Pratap University of Agriculture and Technology | Kumar R.A.,National Research Center on Camels | Ghanshyam T.,Maharana Pratap University of Agriculture and Technology | Rajesh D.,University of Rajasthan | Garg R.,Maharana Pratap University of Agriculture and Technology
Tropical Animal Health and Production | Year: 2012

The effect of feeding different proportions of groundnut haulms (Arachis hypogaea) and cluster bean straw (Cyamopsis tetragonoloba) on nutrient digestibility, nutritive value, nutrient intake and serum biochemical parameters was studied using nine male dromedary camels of Bikaneri breeds (637. 5 kg average body weight; 8-9 years of age). Groundnut haulms (GNH) and cluster bean straw (CBS) were fed in one of three ratios, 75:25, 50:50 and 25:75 in treatments T1, T2 and T3, respectively. In all treatments, concentrate mixture was fed as per requirement of the camels. The groundnut haulms were more nutritive as compared to the cluster bean straw. The nutrient digestibility of dry matter, organic matter, crude protein (CP), crude fibre and acid detergent fibre was better in T1 than T2 and T3. Likewise, the CP, digestible crude protein and total digestible nutrient contents were significantly higher in T1 followed by T2 and T3. There was non-significant affect on average daily gain of camels. However, dry matter intake, digestible crude protein intake and total digestible nutrients were better in T1 as compared to T2 and T3. The total water intake per kilogram of dry matter intake (litres) was 2. 98, 2. 89 and 2. 68, respectively, in T1, T2 and T3. The camels in all the treatments were in positive nitrogen, calcium and phosphorus balance. The treatments had a significant effect on serum biochemical parameters like glucose, cholesterol, aspartate transaminase and creatinine. The results may conclude that feeding of higher proportion of groundnut haulms as compared to cluster bean straw has pronounced improvement in nutritional utilisation by the camels. © 2012 Springer Science+Business Media B.V.


Singh S.,National Research Center on Camels | Dedar R.K.,National Research Center on Equines | Patil N.V.,National Research Center on Camels
Journal of Camel Practice and Research | Year: 2013

Biomarkers of oxidative stress malondialdehyde, catalase, reduced glutathione and plasma vitamin E were evaluated in pregnant, lactating and non pregnant non lactating Indian camels. Whole blood levels of malondialdehyde (lipid peroxidation product) were significantly higher in pregnant camels (28.11±0.44 nanomol/ml) than the non pregnant non lactating (25.86 +0.91 nanomol/ml). Levels of catalase (antioxidant enzyme) and reduced glutathione (antioxidant protein) were also lower in pregnant and lactating camels than the non pregnant non lactating camels. Study showed that levels of oxidative stress biomarkers are higher in pregnant and lactating camels than the control non lactating non pregnant camels.

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