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Chatterjee N.S.,ICAR Central Institute of Fisheries Technology CIFT Junction Matsyapuri PO | Banerjee K.,National Referral Laboratory National Research Center for Grapes Manjri Farm Pune 412307 India | Utture S.,National Referral Laboratory National Research Center for Grapes Manjri Farm Pune 412307 India | Kamble N.,National Referral Laboratory National Research Center for Grapes Manjri Farm Pune 412307 India | And 3 more authors.
Journal of the Science of Food and Agriculture | Year: 2015

BACKGROUND: The pangasius catfish (Pangasianodon hypophthalmus) is a ubiquitous item of seafood in global markets. However, pesticide residues in aquaculture fish, arising from agricultural run-off and/or direct application during pond preparation, pest control and harvest, are a potential food safety concern. This study assessed the level of chemical hazard in domestic and imported pangasius fish in India. RESULTS: A total of 119 contaminants, including polyaromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), organochlorines (OCs) and other groups of pesticides, were screened in 148 samples during 2014-2015 as the first endeavour of its kind in an Indian context, employing a validated gas chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry (GC/MS/MS) method. Apart from the low-level incidence of OCs, pesticides such as quinalphos, malathion, parathion-methyl, etc. were detected in 38% of the samples. In comparison with Indian pangasius, fewer contaminants at low residue level were detected in pangasius fillets imported from Vietnam. CONCLUSION: The human dietary exposures of the residue concentrations detected were less than the maximum permissible intakes and hence appeared safe. However, detection of commonly used pesticides indicated their direct application in aquaculture and contamination from agricultural run-off. This emphasizes the need for continual residue monitoring in aquaculture fish. © 2015 Society of Chemical Industry. Source

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