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News Article | February 15, 2017
Site: www.prweb.com

“We all need an escape now and then ... to get in touch with our more natural side and let the cares of the world drift away," wrote Money Inc., in its recent list of top luxury wildlife resorts in the United States. "The perfect way to do this is to find one of the elusive wildlife lodges that still remain in the United States.”. One of the featured 10 lodges where visitors can find peace of mind in luxurious natural surroundings is the exclusive, all-inclusive Brooks Lake Lodge & Spa, located in scenic Wyoming backcountry near Jackson Hole and Yellowstone National Park. Money Inc.’s list of Top 10 Luxury Wildlife Lodges in the United States provides travelers with its top picks for best places to escape and enjoy wildlife, with Brooks Lake Lodge, situated at 9,200 ft. above sea level among rugged Rocky Mountain peaks, perfectly fitting the bill. With its full array of outdoor activities – hiking, horseback riding, fishing, archery and canoeing in summer and fall, and snowshoeing, cross country skiing, snowmobiling and ice fishing in winter – coupled with gourmet meals, plush accommodations and a full-service spa, the lodge has luxury in the wilderness covered. This month, popular travel magazine “Vacation Idea” shared its 23 Stunning Inns & Lodges in the U.S. Rocky Mountains, emphasizing destinations near national parks, and again Brooks Lake Lodge – located near Grand Teton and Yellowstone National Parks – made the list. Highlighting the resort as a “lovely Rocky Mountain getaway with rustic cabins surrounded by unforgettable scenery,” the travel website went on to list the historic guest ranch’s selection of outdoor lovers’ activities that take full advantage of the lodge’s remarkable wild setting, deep in Shoshone National Forest near Dubois, Wyoming. Also this month, historic Brooks Lake Lodge, built nearly 100 years ago in Western Craftsman style, made Only in Your State’s list of The 20 Places You Should Go in Wyoming in 2017. The popular website named Brooks Lake Lodge Wyoming’s “Most Hidden Resort,” including the secluded guest ranch on its impressive list of the state’s top destinations. “It’s hidden away in the Rocky Mountains, making it a peaceful vacation resort with luxurious rustic accommodations surrounded by gorgeous natural scenery,” writes the website. “It’s so nice to see Brooks Lake Lodge recognized among so many places to visit both nationally and within our state,” says General Manager Adam Long. “Every year we strive to create that perfect balance of nature, luxury and fun for our guests, who often return to us after enjoying memorable and meaningful vacations in our unique, remote setting. We are honored to be included in these recent ‘best’ lists that highlight many of the special things about Brooks Lake Lodge.” Brooks Lake Lodge & Spa, known for its remarkable backcountry location and excellent customer service with a nearly 1:1 guest-to-staff ratio, is currently enjoying its winter season with lots of new snow for the many winter enthusiasts who roam the nearly two million acres of snowy terrain for outdoor play before returning to the crackling fireplaces and delicious meals inside the lodge’s historic walls. All meals are included in overnight stays and served by the lodge’s master chef in the striking stone-and-timber dining hall. Guests of the lodge can also relax with a soak in the 11-by-17 ft. hot tub while taking in spectacular views of the Pinnacle Buttes and alpine Brooks Lake as well as choosing among a variety of massages and facials offered in the on-site Rocky Mountain Spa. Brooks Lake Lodge & Spa, a 100-year-old historic guest ranch near Jackson Hole, Grand Teton National Park and Yellowstone National Park, is located one mile from the North American Continental Divide, with views of the Pinnacle Buttes, Austin's Peak and Brooks Mountain. Surrounded by evergreen forests, wildlife and Brooks Lake, the exclusive, all-inclusive Wyoming Rocky Mountain resort offers five-star service, luxury accommodations and gourmet dining. The new separate spa facility was built with Western Craftsman-style detailing to complement the historic lodge. A dude ranch by summer and ski and snowmobile haven in the winter, the lodge provides year-round activities for outdoor enthusiasts. All-inclusive rates include lodging, meals, activities and spa access. For additional information and reservations visit http://www.brookslake.com or call 866.213.4022.


In the midst of highly publicized steps to dismantle insurance coverage for 32 million people and defund women’s healthcare facilities, Republican lawmakers have quietly laid the foundation to give away Americans’ birthright: 640m acres of national land. In a single line of changes to the rules for the House of Representatives, Republicans have overwritten the value of federal lands, easing the path to disposing of federal property even if doing so loses money for the government and provides no demonstrable compensation to American citizens. At stake are areas managed by the Bureau of Land Management (BLM), National Forests and Federal Wildlife Refuges, which contribute to an estimated $646bn each year in economic stimulus from recreation on public lands and 6.1m jobs. Transferring these lands to the states, critics fear, could decimate those numbers by eliminating mixed-use requirements, limiting public access and turning over large portions for energy or property development. In addition to economic stimulus from outdoor activities, federal land creates revenue through oil and gas production, logging and other industrial uses. According to the BLM, in 2016, it made $2bn in royalty revenue from federal leases. The Outdoor Industry Association estimates federal tax revenue from the recreation economy at almost $40bn. Ignoring those figures, the new language for the House budget, authored by Utah Republican representative Rob Bishop, who has a history of fighting to transfer public land to the states, says that federal land is effectively worthless. Transferring public land to “state, local government or tribal entity shall not be considered as providing new budget authority, decreasing revenues, increasing mandatory spending or increasing outlays.” Essentially, the revised budget rules deny that federal land has any value at all, allowing the new Congress to sidestep requirements that a bill giving away a piece of federal land does not decrease federal revenue or contribute to the federal debt. Republican eagerness to cede federal land to local governments for possible sale, mining or development is already moving states to act. Western states, where most federal land is concentrated, are already introducing legislation that pave the way for land transfers. In Wyoming, for example, the 2017 senate has introduced a joint resolution that would amend the state constitution to dictate how public land given to the state by the federal government after 2019 is managed. It has little public support, but Wyoming Senate President Eli Bebout said that he thought the state should be preemptively thinking about what it would do with federal land. The Congressional devaluation of national property is the most far-reaching legislative change in a recent push to transfer federal lands to the states. Because of the Republican majority in Congress, bills proposing land transfers could now swiftly diminish Forest Service and BLM lands across the country. “We didn’t see it coming. I think it was sneaky and underhanded. It exemplifies an effort to not play by the rules,” said Alan Rowsome, senior director of government relations at The Wilderness Society. “This is the worst Congress for public lands ever.” Rowsome said he’s not exactly sure how the rule will be used, but he thinks the first places to come under attack might include areas adjacent to the majestic Grand Canyon National Park in Arizona and Minnesota’s Boundary Waters Canoe Area Wilderness. Those areas hold uranium and copper, respectively. Rowsome said he’s worried that sensitive tracts of public land, like the oil-rich Arctic National Wildlife Refuge, could soon be up for sale. Some 60% percent of Alaska is made up of national land, and the state’s representatives have tried to pass laws claiming parts of it for state use as recently as 2015. “It’s an amazing ecosystem and worthy of protection, and it’s very likely that House Republican majority will open that up for drilling,” Rowsome said. This latest effort comes on the heels of a bill adopted in 2016 that directs the Department of Agriculture to transfer 2m acres of eligible Forest Service lands to each state. Giving away national land has been part of the Republican Party platform since the mid-80s, after Reagan declared himself a Sagebrush Rebel, but it’s regained steam in the past few years as 20 states have introduced some form of legislation suggesting that federal property be given to local governments. In 2015, Bishop and fellow Utah representative Chris Stewart formed the Federal Land Action Group, a congressional team with the specific intent to come up with a framework for transferring public land. “Washington bureaucrats don’t listen to people,” Bishop said in a statement. “Local governments do.” But Rowsome argues that’s a populist message without any popular support, pushed by a small faction of legislators with support from industries like mining and energy. Despite the Republican message that Washington has overstepped in designating national parks and monuments, a 2016 study found that 95% of the American public believes that National Parks are worth protecting and 80% said they’d be willing to pay higher taxes to do so. “Western Republicans that are perpetuating the idea are very well funded by the oil and gas industry during their campaign,” Rowsome said. “It’s special interests wielding power for an agenda that will advance their goal. Nearly 90% of BLM lands are already open, but they can’t stop trying to get more.” A 2016 Colorado College survey of seven western states found that 60% of voters rejected both the sale of public lands to states and giving states control without sale. In 2012, Arizona voters struck down two pieces of legislation that would have turned over federal land to the state, including one that claimed the Grand Canyon as state land. Opponents fear that local governments, especially in states with small budgets, won’t be able to invest in management and will sell off land to make money. Last summer, the Forest Service was spending $240m a week to suppress wildfires, and the Department of Interior estimates the cost of deferred maintenance, like updating roads, at around $11bn. In December, Wyoming Governor Matt Mead said that transferring public land to his state was legally and financially impractical. He cited firefighting costs on public land as something that the state budget wouldn’t have room for. Historically, when federal lands have been transferred to states, they have become less accessible. Idaho sold off almost 100,000 acres of its public land between 2000 and 2009. In Colorado, access has been limited the public can only use 20% of state trust land for hunting and fishing. John Gale, conservation director for the advocacy group Backcountry Hunters and Anglers, said that he’s worried about access for sportsmen. He believes that there’s a further danger in segmenting ecosystems through state-by-state development. “70% of the headwaters of our streams and rivers in the West are on public lands,” he said. “Rivers and migratory corridors don’t follow state boundaries.” The incoming administration hasn’t been clear about where it falls on transfers. Montana Congressman Ryan Zinke, tapped to be the next Secretary of the Interior, voted for the rules package, but in the past he’s been against land transfers. President-elect Donald Trump has spoken out against reallocating federal land, but he’s also met with prominent pro-land transfer groups. Nevertheless, bills proposing land transfer will now have an easy route to passage, as they won’t need to be backed by any financial justification. The entire rules package passed on party lines, but it runs counter to legislation that passed both the House and Senate in November, the Outdoor Recreation Jobs and Economic Impact Act of 2016. Signed into law in December, the legislation requires the Department of Commerce to count the over half a trillion dollars from the outdoor recreation economy in the country’s GDP for the first time. “It’s not just natural resources that are on the auction block, but jobs,” said Gale. “For a party that prides itself on being fiscally conservative ... they’re talking out of both sides of their mouth.”


News Article | February 20, 2017
Site: www.eurekalert.org

DURHAM, N.C. - Forest elephant populations in one of Central Africa's largest and most important preserves have declined between 78 percent and 81 percent because of poaching, a new Duke University-led study finds. "Our research suggests that more than 25,000 elephants in Gabon's Minkébé National Park may have been killed for their ivory between 2004 and 2014," said John Poulsen, assistant professor of tropical ecology at Duke's Nicholas School of the Environment. "With nearly half of Central Africa's estimated 100,000 forest elephants thought to live in Gabon, the loss of 25,000 elephants from this key sanctuary is a considerable setback for the preservation of the species," he said. While some of the poaching originated from within Gabon, findings from the new study indicate that cross-border poaching by hunters from neighboring nations -- chiefly Cameroon to the north -- largely drove the precipitous decline. Poulsen and his colleagues published their peer-reviewed findings Feb. 20 in the journal Current Biology. They estimated the extent of the population losses by comparing data from two large-scale surveys of elephant dung in Minkébé National Park from 2004 and 2014, using two different analytic methods to account for periods of heavy rainfall that might speed the dung's decay and skew the surveys' accuracy. "Based on changes in the abundance and geographic distribution of the dung, we identified two fronts of poaching pressure," Poulsen said. "Elephant numbers in the south of the park, which is 58 kilometers from the nearest major Gabonese road, have been somewhat reduced," he said. "By comparison, the central and northern parts of the park -- which, at one point, are just 6.1 kilometers from Cameroon's national road -- have been emptied." The proximity of this road makes it relatively easy for Cameroonese poachers to access the park and transport their illegal haul back to their nation's largest city, Douala, a major hub of the international ivory trade. Since 2011, the Gabonese government has taken major steps to curb poaching in Minkébé, Poulsen noted. Among other things, they have elevated forest elephants' conservation status to "fully protected," created a National Park Police force, doubled the national park agency's budget, and become the first African nation to burn all confiscated ivory. These efforts are laudable and may be reducing poaching from within Gabon, Poulsen said, but the new research suggests they have done little to slow the illegal cross-border traffic. "The clock is ticking," he said. "To save Central Africa's forest elephants, we need to create new multinational protected areas and coordinate international law enforcement to ensure the prosecution of foreign nationals who commit or encourage wildlife crimes in other countries," he said. "Studies showing sharp declines in forest elephant populations are nothing new," he said, "but a 78 to 81 percent loss in a single decade from one of the largest, most remote protected areas in Central Africa is a startling warning that no place is safe from poaching." Researchers from the National Parks Agency of Gabon, the University of South Florida, the Max Planck Institute for Ornithology, the World Wildlife Fund Central Africa Regional Program Office, Gabon's Institute for Tropical Ecology Research, and the University of Stirling conducted the study with Poulsen. Duke-affiliated co-authors were Connie Clark, Amelia Meier, Cooper Rosin, Sarah Moore, Sally Koerner and Vincent Medjibe. The 2004 and 2014 surveys used in the new study were funded by four agencies: the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, the World Wildlife Fund, the Wildlife Conservation Society, and the Convention on the International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora's Monitoring the Illegal Killing of Elephants program.


News Article | February 16, 2017
Site: www.prweb.com

Great Runs, the ultimate guide for travelers who love to run or runners who love to travel, unveils its official selection of the Top 100 Runs in America’s Cities. Think of this as similar to those travel guides that say “You have 24 or 48 hours in Dublin, what should you see?” This is that same idea, for runners. There are great places to run. And then there are the iconic runs. The ‘must do’, or ‘bucket list’ runs. Going to Chicago for the first time – need to run the Lakefront Trail. Same goes for the Charles River in Boston, the National Mall in Washington, Piedmont Park in Atlanta. This guide of 100 great runs not only highlights the desired scenic route, but where to start and end for an average five-mile loop. How are the runs selected? Lots and lots of research. Great Runs has developed running guides for nearly all the major cities in North America, comprising some 10-15 great routes for each city, based on extensive runner interviews and first-hand research. From this list two ‘iconic runs’ have been selected for the top 50 or so cities or regions, by population, in the United States. What qualifies as an ‘iconic’ run? It is centrally located, usually near downtown/city center, is especially interesting, scenic, or beautiful, and epitomizes the city in some way. The top 100 Routes list is below. Please click here to see a more detailed chart that includes a link to each route, and details on what makes it iconic. The list is a great mix of gorgeous urban parks, wonderful trails, urban beach and waterfront runs, and tours of important sites. Most of the routes are ‘walkable,’ too! Runners may submit their own ideas for a city on the list, or an area that hasn't been developed yet…anywhere in the world! About Great Runs: Great Runs is the ultimate guide to the best places to run in the world’s major cities. It’s for travelers who run and runners who travel.® We’ve completed guides for 100+ cities worldwide, major vacation destinations such as Disney and the National Parks, and fun compilations such as ‘Best Foliage Runs in Vermont’ and ‘Best Beach Runs in New England.’ Mark Lowenstein, Chief Running Officer, is available for interviews and is always interested in creating a “running dialog.”


News Article | February 20, 2017
Site: www.eurekalert.org

Winner of an eBay auction Steve Mix received the opportunity to pick the name for a new species of satiny-white winged moth collected from the white gypsum dunes of the White Sands National Monument, New Mexico. A fan of butterflies and moths himself, he chose to honor his supportive and encouraging mother Delinda Mix, so the moth is now formally listed under the species name delindae. It is described in the open access journal ZooKeys. Having spent 10 years studying the moth fauna at the White Sands National Monument, Eric H. Metzler, curator at the Michigan State University, but also research collaborator at the National Museum of Natural History, Smithsonian Institution, and research associate at the University of New Mexico and the University of Florida, discovered the moth during the first year of the study, in 2007. Back then, he spotted a curious small white moth with a satiny appearance, which immediately drew his attention. Already assigned to the genus Givira to the family commonly known as carpenter millers, the moth was yet to be identified as a species. While most of its North American 'relatives' are either dark-colored, or have substantial dark smudges on the forewings, there are only four of them, including the new species, which are substantially white with few or no dark markings. Further hindrance occurred when the researcher tried to study the specimens, as pinned moths turned out greased due to their abdomens being full of fatty tissue. However, the specialist managed to degrease them by carefully brushing their scales, and, having compared them to related species, confirmed them as representatives of a species new to science. Then, Eric joined the fundraising event, organized by the Western National Parks Association (WNPA), a non-profit education partner of the US National Park Service. The highest bidder in the eBay auction would receive the chance to pick the scientific name for the satiny-looking moth, and thus, become part of history. Having won the opportunity, Steve Mix, who himself had once been interested in studying butterflies and moths, and has been maintaining his fondness of them ever since, decided to name the species after his mother Delinda Mix, in gratitude for "the support and encouragement she gave to her son". "Steve Mix submitted the winning bid, and he chose to have the moth named after his mother because of the lasting nature of this naming opportunity", shares Eric. "I received no remuneration in this fundraising venture, and by volunteering my personal money, time, expertise, and experience I was able to help WNPA gain world-wide positive publicity while raising some much needed cash. The rewards to me were being able to help WNPA and Steve Mix honor his mother, which is just so very sentimental". "WNPA is so pleased that we were able to work with Eric and we are grateful to Steve. This project is a shining example of working together towards the common good of our parks with the added value of providing a priceless experience for everyone involved", says Amy Reichgott, Development Manager at the Western National Parks Association. Metzler EH (2017) The Lepidoptera of White Sands National Monument, Otero County, New Mexico, USA 9. A new species of Givira Walker (Cossidae, Hypoptinae) dedicated to Delinda Mix, including a list of species of Cossidae recorded from the Monument. ZooKeys 655: 141-156. https:/


The International Nurses Association is pleased to welcome Alayne J. Reid, BN, MHSc, MN, to their prestigious organization with her upcoming publication in the Worldwide Leaders in Healthcare. Alayne J. Reid is a Registered Nurse with over 40 years of experience in her field and an extensive expertise in all facets of nursing, especially cancer nursing and nurse education. Alayne is currently serving as a Clinical Facilitator within Griffith University in Queensland, Australia and is also affiliated with Logan Hospital. Alayne earned her initial Nursing Certification in 1978 from Princess Alexandra Hospital. She then attended the University of New England in New South Wales, where she graduated with her Bachelor Degree in Nursing in 1993, followed by her Graduate Certificate in Nursing Education in 1995. An advocate for continuing education, Alayne gained her Master’s Degree in Nursing in 2000 from Queensland University of Technology, before completing her Master’s Degree in Health Science in 2002 from the University of Sydney. Furthermore, Alayne is Chemotherapy/Biotherapy Certified, and maintains professional memberships with the Royal College of Nursing and the Australian Nurse Teachers Society. Throughout her successful career, Alayne has worked in various areas of nursing, having been a cancer nurse for 28 years. In her current position in Griffith University, Alayne lectures, tutors, and facilitates students during their practicums. She attributes her success to her desire to help and care for people, as well as being honest and nurturing. When she is not working, Alayne enjoys hiking with her husband, enjoying Australia’s National Parks, traveling, reading, and cross stitching. Learn more about Alayne J. Reid here: http://inanurse.org/network/index.php?do=/4130243/info/ and be sure to read her upcoming publication in the Worldwide Leaders in Healthcare.


News Article | February 23, 2017
Site: www.eurekalert.org

Even Punxsutawaney Phil can't be blamed for being baffled this year and hightailing it back to his burrow. He predicted six more weeks of winter on Feb 2, but by then spring was already springing well ahead of historical norms in much of the USA. While we've known for a over a decade now that climate change is variably advancing the onset of spring across the United States, a new set of maps from the USGS-led USA National Phenology Network now demonstrates just how ahead of schedule spring is in your precise neck of the woods. The scientifically reviewed maps and the data behind them show that you may want to keep your shorts and flip-flops handy because spring is already knocking at your door, in some places three weeks ahead of schedule. Here's a quick national overview: spring is now making an appearance in coastal California, southern Nevada, southeastern Colorado, central Kansas, Missouri, southern Illinois, Indiana and Ohio. And it's rolling up across West Virginia and Virginia, soon to hit Philly and Indianapolis, but it's already sprung - days ago -- across the southern Great Plains and SE Atlantic Coast, and it was 22 days early in Washington, DC! Why care if glorious days of spring are arriving earlier than normal? "While these earlier springs might not seem like a big deal -- and who among us doesn't appreciate a balmy day or a break in dreary winter weather -- it poses significant challenges for planning and managing important issues that affect our economy and our society," said Dr. Jake Weltzin, a USGS ecologist and the executive director of the USA-NPN. For example, changes in the timing of spring can affect human health, bringing early-season disease-carriers such as ticks and mosquitos, and an earlier, longer and more vigorous pollen season. And while a longer growing season can result in increased yields for some crops, it is risky because of the higher likelihood of plant damage caused by late frosts or summer drought. Even something as seemingly simple and beautiful as flowers blooming earlier can disrupt the critically important link between wildflowers and the arrival of birds, bees, and butterflies that feed on and pollinate the flowers. Such changes may prove beneficial to some plants and animals, including some harmful invasive ones, but may be detrimental to others. Changes in seasons can affect economically and culturally important outdoor recreation activities, including affecting the timing of hunting and fishing seasons. Weltzin noted that the approaches used for this study, in particular the plant leafing model though it was applied to a much longer climate dataset, were the foundation for a recent study that showed that spring is arriving earlier than ever in three out of four US National Parks across the nation, and that that fully half of all national Parks are experiencing extreme early onsets of spring relative to the last century. These findings are consistent with the fact that the instrumental record shows that 2016 was the hottest year ever recorded for the globe, and that it was the third record-breaking year in a row. Researchers have noted that 16 of the 17 hottest years recorded occurred since 2000. These new maps show that 2017, at least so far, is shaping up to be another warm one, but also that different regions exhibit variable responses over time. To build the maps, the researchers with the USA-NPN used climate change indicators called the Spring Indices -- models based on nationwide field observations collected about when enough heat has accumulated to initiate leafing and blooming in lilacs and honeysuckles, two common and temperature-sensitive flowering plants. They also gathered recent nationwide heat and temperature data from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), including daily data used for the National Weather Service, and historical daily data from a database maintained by Oregon State University, all adjusted each day to a 2-mile resolution. When the researchers applied the plant models to the recent weather data, they were able to create national-scale daily maps of leaf emergence for these plant species. Then, by comparing the daily maps from this year to historical maps created the same way, they created maps that showed just how different this year is relative to the long-term average (1981-2010). It is these data that reveal just how unusually early spring is arriving across most of the USA this year. Phenology is nature's calendar -- when trees leaf and bloom, when birds build their nests or salmon swim upstream, or when crops mature or leaves turn color in the fall. Phenology refers to the science focused on understanding key seasonal changes in plants and animals from year to year, and how these seasonal events vary with weather and climate. Want to know more about observed changes in plant and animal phenology in your region over the last century? Explore the USA-NPN's series of regional information sheets: Alaska and the Arctic; Great Plains; Hawai'i and the Pacific Islands; Midwest; Northeast; Pacific Northwest; Southeast; and Southwest. Data used to develop these maps, and to demonstrate changes in our National Parks, were collected by volunteer who recorded and shared phenological observations across the nation. Would you like to get involved? We need your help to collect observational data to assess how accurate our models are, and to develop similar models for other plant species - and animals too! In three simple steps, you can become a citizen scientist and help collect critical life-cycle observations for indicator plant and animal species: 1. Join Nature's Notebook by visiting http://www. , 2. Choose the location and species you'll observe, and 3. Start observing and know that your observations inform scientific discovery and decision-making. More about the USA-NPN The USA National Phenology Network is a partnership among governmental and nongovernmental science and resource management agencies and organizations, the academic community and the public. It is led by, and receives major funding from the US Geological Survey.


CHANTILLY, Va.--(BUSINESS WIRE)--The first top ten chart of 2017 from The Great Courses Plus shows Americans seeking insight from history as well as studying ways they can self-improve—including courses spanning cognitive therapy and tai chi. The subscription-based streaming service from the premier lifelong learning provider offers over 4,000 hours of lectures. Fully half of this month’s top ten are devoted to learning from the past with lectures exploring Earth’s amazing 4.54 billion-year history; Europe on the cusp of the Black Death; Jesus’ role in shaping Western civilization; a look at Native American culture; and finally, a ‘Big History’ approach to two of the world’s oldest cities. Subscribers also made use of courses on self-improvement. “Cognitive Behavioral Foundations,” the third most-watched lecture of 2016, moves to the top of the list in January. It’s joined by a similarly themed “Take Control of Your Automatic Brain” with strategies on how to overcome fear, anger, depression and whatever else holds you back. New to the chart this month is a tai chi primer from David-Dorian Ross, a U.S. gold medalist in competitive tai chi who is collaborating with Harvard Medical School to study the benefits of martial arts in the workplace. The popular lecture on how to draw, as well as an appreciation of our National Parks system round out the top ten. “The January top courses reflect our users’ desire to better understand the world around them by revisiting key periods in world history,” said Ed Leon, Chief Brand Officer at The Great Courses. “Not surprisingly, many Plus users are also pursuing New Year’s resolutions to channel emotions and energy in positive directions in order to impact their overall happiness.” Here are January’s top ten lectures from The Great Courses Plus: Contact The Great Courses with questions or visit us on Twitter, Facebook, Pinterest or YouTube. #LifelongLearning #WhatAmericaIsLearning #cognitivetherapy #Yellowstone #TaiChi #history #BlackDeath #NativeAmerica About The Great Courses Plus The Great Courses Plus is a video streaming subscription service offering members unlimited access to more than 8,000 lectures online via connected television and mobile devices for a periodic fee. New members can sample the service without risk for a one-month free trial. Learn more at www.thegreatcoursesplus.com. The Great Courses is the nation’s leading developer and marketer of premium-quality media for lifelong learning and personal enrichment. Delivered in engaging, expertly produced video and audio (in convenient online, digital, video on demand and disc formats), these carefully crafted courses provide access to a world of knowledge from the most accomplished professors and experts. The content-rich, proprietary library spans more than 600 series with more than 14,000 lectures designed to expand horizons, deepen understanding, and foster epiphanies in the arts, science, literature, self-improvement, history, music, philosophy, theology, economics, mathematics, business and professional advancement. Creating unique learning experiences since 1990, The Great Courses is the premier brand of The Teaching Company, LLC of Chantilly, Virginia, which is owned by Los Angeles-based Brentwood Associates. More information can be found at www.thegreatcourses.com.


News Article | February 22, 2017
Site: www.businesswire.com

PHOENIX--(BUSINESS WIRE)--The board of directors of Viad Corp (NYSE:VVI) declared a quarterly dividend of $0.10 per share on the common stock of Viad. The dividend is payable April 3, 2017, to stockholders of record on March 10, 2017. Viad (NYSE: VVI) generates revenue and shareholder value through its two business groups: the Marketing & Events Group (GES) and the Travel & Recreation Group (T&R). GES is a global, full-service live events company offering a comprehensive range of services to the world's leading brands and event organizers. T&R is a collection of iconic destination travel experiences that showcase the best of Banff, Jasper, Glacier, Denali and Kenai Fjords National Parks. Viad is an S&P SmallCap 600 company. For more information, visit the company's Web site at www.viad.com.


News Article | February 15, 2017
Site: www.prweb.com

Since 1967 Teton Science Schools has been teaching about the natural world and the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem while inspiring curiosity, engagement and leadership through transformative place-based education. In honor of this milestone 50th anniversary, the schools’ Yellowstone tour company, Wildlife Expeditions of Teton Science Schools, is offering special pricing starting at $299 per person on specific dates for its popular full-day Old Faithful winter expeditions out of Jackson Hole, Wyoming, from now through March 15, 2017. Recently hailed by TravelChannel.com as a bucket list destination, Wildlife Expeditions offers an adventure to rival an African safari without leaving the U.S., capturing an intimate experience of wildlife in ancient habitat while delving deeper into the context of the parks and ecosystem. While exploring the serene snowy magic of Yellowstone National Park in winter, Wildlife Expeditions guests travel in comfort. The top Jackson Hole wildlife tour operator recently released a short video capturing the unique experience and easy outdoor access of their winter expeditions in a custom-designed Mercedes-Benz Sprinter snowcoach. Experienced guides share the scientific perspective on Yellowstone’s unique geothermal features such as Old Faithful, Upper Geyser Basin and West Thumb Geyser Basin, and guests can enjoy frequent stops for photography, snacks, hot beverages and walks among otherworldly formations in the majestic winter landscape. Use of high quality optics, Yaktrax traction devices and walking poles are provided, and winter expedition guests may view wildlife including the recently designated U.S. national mammal, the bison. Operated by Teton Science Schools, Wildlife Expeditions runs half, full and multiday trips to Yellowstone and Grand Teton National Parks. While the special anniversary pricing is available only on the Old Faithful full-day tour, other winter trips include a full-day Wildlife Art & Sleigh Expedition and the premier week-long Winter Wolves of Yellowstone adventure. About Wildlife Expeditions of Teton Science Schools: With a mission of inspiring curiosity, engagement and leadership through transformative place-based education, Wildlife Expeditions of Teton Science Schools has a well-earned reputation of leading exceptional safari tours and locating wild animals in the wilderness in and around Yellowstone and Grand Teton National Parks. Jackson Hole, Wyoming's premier and original safari provider, Wildlife Expeditions offers family-friendly educational tours year-round in a stunning natural environment. The wildlife tour company has been featured in Conde Nast Traveler, as a bucket-list destination by TravelChannel.com and one of “10 Amazing Adventures” worldwide by USA Today. For more information or to book a Wildlife Expeditions tour, visit http://www.tetonscience.org.

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