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News Article | May 9, 2017
Site: www.prnewswire.com

"As active members of the community surrounding the Flight 93 National Memorial, we are honored to extend our support of the reforestation effort into 2017," said Todd Brice, president and chief executive officer of S&T Bank. "Our thanks go out to our customers, whose 'green' commitment inspires our support of this meaningful event, as well as our dedicated employees who volunteer to roll up their sleeves and get their hands dirty for a worthy cause, year after year." The ongoing reforestation effort, led by the National Park Service and Friends of Flight 93, seeks to ultimately root more than 150,000 new trees at the Flight 93 National Memorial. This year's event is expected to draw more than 500 volunteers, including two teams of Bank employees, to plant seedlings across 17 acres of memorial landscape. For more information, and to enroll in Billpay and online statements, please visit www.stbank.com. About S&T Bancorp, Inc. S&T Bancorp, Inc. is a $7.1 billion bank holding company that is headquartered in Indiana, Pa. and trades on the NASDAQ Global Select Market under the symbol STBA. Its principal subsidiary, S&T Bank, was established in 1902, and operates locations in Pennsylvania, Ohio and New York. For more information visit www.stbancorp.com, www.stbank.com, and follow us on Facebook, Instagram, and LinkedIn. To view the original version on PR Newswire, visit:http://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/st-bank-goes-green-to-benefit-reforestation-effort-at-flight-93-memorial-300454054.html


News Article | May 11, 2017
Site: globenewswire.com

PALO ALTO and SAN MATEO, Calif., May 11, 2017 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- Accellion, Inc., the leading provider in hybrid and private cloud secure content collaboration, and PacketZoom, a leader in mobile application acceleration, today announced they have entered into a development partnership. Under the terms of the agreement, the companies will work together to optimize performance models when sharing and editing large files, further enhancing the performance of Accellion’s kiteworks mobile application. As enterprise content continues to increase in size, spurred in part by the emergence of richer content types including high resolution images and video, a growing mobile workforce will place demands on file sharing applications to deliver content quickly. Documents, spreadsheets, presentations, images, videos and other file formats can range from several megabytes to gigabytes in size, and employee efficiency when collaborating on information with partners or clients will require faster network performance – particularly when using a smartphone or tablet. To stay ahead of this trend, Accellion has identified PacketZoom’s technology as an innovative approach to significantly accelerate content download speeds. Accellion and PacketZoom are currently testing PacketZoom’s Mobile Expresslane solution, integrated with Accellion’s kiteworks mobile application. Accellion anticipates being able to double download speeds using kiteworks’ mobile application once a version incorporating PacketZoom is available, which is expected in an upcoming release. “By reducing round trips over high latency and error prone mobile/Wi-Fi connections, Accellion sees in PacketZoom’s technology the means to transmit data and content from the origin server much faster and much more reliably than with legacy network based stacks,” commented Cliff White, CTO of Accellion. “PacketZoom’s network analytics should also provide great value to kiteworks and our customers by giving insights into how end users are interacting with content.” “Organizations are generating more content than ever, and the demand to share and collaborate efficiently on that content with external partners is increasing as well,” commented Jonathan Yaron, Chairman and CEO of Accellion. “By accelerating download speeds at the last mile, PacketZoom and Accellion are developing an innovative solution that addresses the challenges of delivering larger files, such as medical images for collaborative healthcare, or big data sets for financial analysis. PacketZoom’s vision – and the talented team they have assembled to execute on this vision – is just the kind of development partnership Accellion looks for to enhance our products and serve our customers’ needs. Together, I anticipate we will be able to significantly improve how enterprise employees share richer content and collaborate more effectively.” “We are excited about this partnership and look forward to working closely with Accellion to enhance the mobile enterprise experience, especially with regards to improving file download speeds and continuity,” stated Shlomi Gian, PacketZoom’s CEO. “Organizations in regulated industries that rely on kiteworks for secure collaboration while on the go, will be able to exchange data even faster, in a reliable way, thanks to the integration of PacketZoom Mobile Expresslane.” Accellion, Inc. enables enterprise organizations to collaborate on content with external partners securely via private cloud. Enterprises can leave existing content where it belongs, and extend it to the outside world without having to migrate content or disrupt their business workflows. Accellion’s solutions are used by more than 15 million users and 2,500 of the world’s leading corporations and government agencies including Procter & Gamble; KPMG; Kaiser Permanente; Latham & Watkins; National Park Service; Umpqua Bank; Cargill; and the National Institute for Standards and Technology (NIST). For more information please visit www.accellion.com or call (650) 485-4300. Follow Accellion on LinkedIn, Twitter, Facebook, and Accellion’s Blog. PacketZoom Mobile ExpresslaneTM improves user experience on mobile apps by eliminating performance roadblocks in the mobile last mile, helping mobile publishers boost app performance worldwide by accelerating and improving reliability of content delivery. PacketZoom’s SDK redefines mobile performance via in-app networking technology, customized for each user. By removing roadblocks in the mobile last mile, PacketZoom is able to significantly accelerate performance by 2x to 3x, rescue up to 80% of the sessions from TCP connection drop and reduce CDN costs. For more information: www.packetzoom.com.


News Article | May 11, 2017
Site: globenewswire.com

PALO ALTO and SAN MATEO, Calif., May 11, 2017 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- Accellion, Inc., the leading provider in hybrid and private cloud secure content collaboration, and PacketZoom, a leader in mobile application acceleration, today announced they have entered into a development partnership. Under the terms of the agreement, the companies will work together to optimize performance models when sharing and editing large files, further enhancing the performance of Accellion’s kiteworks mobile application. As enterprise content continues to increase in size, spurred in part by the emergence of richer content types including high resolution images and video, a growing mobile workforce will place demands on file sharing applications to deliver content quickly. Documents, spreadsheets, presentations, images, videos and other file formats can range from several megabytes to gigabytes in size, and employee efficiency when collaborating on information with partners or clients will require faster network performance – particularly when using a smartphone or tablet. To stay ahead of this trend, Accellion has identified PacketZoom’s technology as an innovative approach to significantly accelerate content download speeds. Accellion and PacketZoom are currently testing PacketZoom’s Mobile Expresslane solution, integrated with Accellion’s kiteworks mobile application. Accellion anticipates being able to double download speeds using kiteworks’ mobile application once a version incorporating PacketZoom is available, which is expected in an upcoming release. “By reducing round trips over high latency and error prone mobile/Wi-Fi connections, Accellion sees in PacketZoom’s technology the means to transmit data and content from the origin server much faster and much more reliably than with legacy network based stacks,” commented Cliff White, CTO of Accellion. “PacketZoom’s network analytics should also provide great value to kiteworks and our customers by giving insights into how end users are interacting with content.” “Organizations are generating more content than ever, and the demand to share and collaborate efficiently on that content with external partners is increasing as well,” commented Jonathan Yaron, Chairman and CEO of Accellion. “By accelerating download speeds at the last mile, PacketZoom and Accellion are developing an innovative solution that addresses the challenges of delivering larger files, such as medical images for collaborative healthcare, or big data sets for financial analysis. PacketZoom’s vision – and the talented team they have assembled to execute on this vision – is just the kind of development partnership Accellion looks for to enhance our products and serve our customers’ needs. Together, I anticipate we will be able to significantly improve how enterprise employees share richer content and collaborate more effectively.” “We are excited about this partnership and look forward to working closely with Accellion to enhance the mobile enterprise experience, especially with regards to improving file download speeds and continuity,” stated Shlomi Gian, PacketZoom’s CEO. “Organizations in regulated industries that rely on kiteworks for secure collaboration while on the go, will be able to exchange data even faster, in a reliable way, thanks to the integration of PacketZoom Mobile Expresslane.” Accellion, Inc. enables enterprise organizations to collaborate on content with external partners securely via private cloud. Enterprises can leave existing content where it belongs, and extend it to the outside world without having to migrate content or disrupt their business workflows. Accellion’s solutions are used by more than 15 million users and 2,500 of the world’s leading corporations and government agencies including Procter & Gamble; KPMG; Kaiser Permanente; Latham & Watkins; National Park Service; Umpqua Bank; Cargill; and the National Institute for Standards and Technology (NIST). For more information please visit www.accellion.com or call (650) 485-4300. Follow Accellion on LinkedIn, Twitter, Facebook, and Accellion’s Blog. PacketZoom Mobile ExpresslaneTM improves user experience on mobile apps by eliminating performance roadblocks in the mobile last mile, helping mobile publishers boost app performance worldwide by accelerating and improving reliability of content delivery. PacketZoom’s SDK redefines mobile performance via in-app networking technology, customized for each user. By removing roadblocks in the mobile last mile, PacketZoom is able to significantly accelerate performance by 2x to 3x, rescue up to 80% of the sessions from TCP connection drop and reduce CDN costs. For more information: www.packetzoom.com.


News Article | May 10, 2017
Site: www.chromatographytechniques.com

A creationist geologist who has tried unsuccessfully for four years to get permits to collect rocks from the Grand Canyon to verify the Earth was created in six days has filed a civil rights lawsuit against the National Park Service on Tuesday. Andrew Snelling, who has a doctorate from the University of Sydney and is an ardent Christian, claims the federal government is blocking him based on his deep faith, according to the court documents. Snelling works for a Christian non-profit called Answers in Genesis. The group believes the first book of the Old Testament is literally true – that the world was created in six days by the Judeo-Christian God. Snelling asked to collect some 40 fist-sized rocks to further test his hypothesis that the Grand Canyon is indeed thousands of years old, and not millions, as is generally accepted by most scientists. But while other scientists have collected similar numbers of rocks the size of basketballs, he has been denied his permits, Snelling alleges in his lawsuit. “Dr. Snelling’s intent to perform scientific research in the Grand Canyon National Park is motivated by his sincerely held religious beliefs,” the complaint states. “Defendants have effectively prohibited Dr. Snelling from performing scientific research in the Grand Canyon National Park. “Defendants’ policies and actions expressly discriminated against Dr. Snelling because of his religious faith,” it adds. The lawsuit focuses on President Donald Trump’s Executive Order last week, entitled “Promoting Free Speech and Religious Freedom,” which was aimed at giving more rights to religious groups. The NPS most recently permitted Snelling to travel into the park – but only to take pictures and record GPS coordinates of where he would collect the stones. Such a trip, the geologist argues, would multiply the cost of the research for no reason. In the meantime, several other scientists have received permits to collect larger and more numerous samples, the suit alleges. Most recently, Snelling enlisted the help of Rep. Trent Franks (R-Arizona), who sent the NPS staff a letter. But that letter went unanswered, they claim. “These onerous burdens are simply a pretext to prevent Dr. Snelling’s research from occurring,” they write. Answers in Genesis, Snelling’s employer, was founded by Ken Ham, who recently made headlines with a “life size” reproduction of Noah’s Ark and museum called Ark Encounter in Kentucky. Ham said in a statement that Snelling is being discriminated against, based on his Christian faith. “This case is about good science being practiced by a good scientist who is being blocked by intolerant government bureaucrats,” said Ham. Snelling is represented by the religious legal group Alliance Defending Freedom, based in Scottsdale, Ariz.


Travel and tourism generated an estimated 142,500 direct, indirect and induced jobs in 2015 and around $4.3 billion in wages. Travel and tourism-supported jobs grew 12 percent and tourism-related wages increased 20 percent from 2011 to 2015. Tourism-related sales tax revenues saw healthy increases over this period as well, including a 12 percent increase in municipal transient room tax revenue, a 10 percent increase in county transient room tax revenue and an 8 percent increase in resort communities' sales tax revenue. "In a year of fairly disappointing global economic growth, Utah attracted more spending by international visitors than ever before," said Juliette Tennert, director of economic and public policy research at the Gardner Policy Institute.  "Utah's top international leisure markets are Canada, China and France. Chinese visitors spent an estimated 40 percent more in 2015 than in the previous year."' Utah's "Mighty 5®" national parks experienced record visitation in both 2015 (8.4 million visits) and 2016 (10.1 million visits). According to the National Park Service, non-local visitation to Utah's national parks and places generate over $800 million in spending and support over 14,000 Utah jobs. The full report is available here and includes the most recent travel and tourism-related data that were available at the time of publication; in most cases, data reflect 2015 activity. About the Kem C. Gardner Policy Institute The Kem C. Gardner Policy Institute at the University of Utah enhances Utah's economy by placing data-driven research into the hands of decision makers. Housed within the David Eccles School of Business, its mission is to develop and share economic, demographic and public policy data and research that help community leaders make informed decisions. Located at the newly restored Thomas S. Monson Center on South Temple Street, the Gardner Policy Institute serves as a vital gathering place and center for independent economic, demographic and public policy thought leadership. Learn more at gardner.utah.edu or by calling 801-587-3717. About the David Eccles School of Business Founded in 1917 and educating more than 4,500 students annually, the David Eccles School of Business offers eight undergraduate majors, four MBAs, five other graduate programs, a Ph.D. program and executive education curricula. The Eccles School is also home to eight institutes and centers, including the Kem C. Gardner Policy Institute, which deliver academic research and support an ecosystem of entrepreneurship and innovation. It is consistently one of the top schools in the nation for startup businesses based on university research. Experiential learning is central to the Eccles experience. For more information, visit Eccles.Utah.edu or call 801-581-7676. To view the original version on PR Newswire, visit:http://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/summer-travel-season-begins-with-record-setting-economic-impacts-in-travel-and-tourism-industry-300455052.html


News Article | May 11, 2017
Site: globenewswire.com

PALO ALTO and SAN MATEO, Calif., May 11, 2017 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- Accellion, Inc., the leading provider in hybrid and private cloud secure content collaboration, and PacketZoom, a leader in mobile application acceleration, today announced they have entered into a development partnership. Under the terms of the agreement, the companies will work together to optimize performance models when sharing and editing large files, further enhancing the performance of Accellion’s kiteworks mobile application. As enterprise content continues to increase in size, spurred in part by the emergence of richer content types including high resolution images and video, a growing mobile workforce will place demands on file sharing applications to deliver content quickly. Documents, spreadsheets, presentations, images, videos and other file formats can range from several megabytes to gigabytes in size, and employee efficiency when collaborating on information with partners or clients will require faster network performance – particularly when using a smartphone or tablet. To stay ahead of this trend, Accellion has identified PacketZoom’s technology as an innovative approach to significantly accelerate content download speeds. Accellion and PacketZoom are currently testing PacketZoom’s Mobile Expresslane solution, integrated with Accellion’s kiteworks mobile application. Accellion anticipates being able to double download speeds using kiteworks’ mobile application once a version incorporating PacketZoom is available, which is expected in an upcoming release. “By reducing round trips over high latency and error prone mobile/Wi-Fi connections, Accellion sees in PacketZoom’s technology the means to transmit data and content from the origin server much faster and much more reliably than with legacy network based stacks,” commented Cliff White, CTO of Accellion. “PacketZoom’s network analytics should also provide great value to kiteworks and our customers by giving insights into how end users are interacting with content.” “Organizations are generating more content than ever, and the demand to share and collaborate efficiently on that content with external partners is increasing as well,” commented Jonathan Yaron, Chairman and CEO of Accellion. “By accelerating download speeds at the last mile, PacketZoom and Accellion are developing an innovative solution that addresses the challenges of delivering larger files, such as medical images for collaborative healthcare, or big data sets for financial analysis. PacketZoom’s vision – and the talented team they have assembled to execute on this vision – is just the kind of development partnership Accellion looks for to enhance our products and serve our customers’ needs. Together, I anticipate we will be able to significantly improve how enterprise employees share richer content and collaborate more effectively.” “We are excited about this partnership and look forward to working closely with Accellion to enhance the mobile enterprise experience, especially with regards to improving file download speeds and continuity,” stated Shlomi Gian, PacketZoom’s CEO. “Organizations in regulated industries that rely on kiteworks for secure collaboration while on the go, will be able to exchange data even faster, in a reliable way, thanks to the integration of PacketZoom Mobile Expresslane.” Accellion, Inc. enables enterprise organizations to collaborate on content with external partners securely via private cloud. Enterprises can leave existing content where it belongs, and extend it to the outside world without having to migrate content or disrupt their business workflows. Accellion’s solutions are used by more than 15 million users and 2,500 of the world’s leading corporations and government agencies including Procter & Gamble; KPMG; Kaiser Permanente; Latham & Watkins; National Park Service; Umpqua Bank; Cargill; and the National Institute for Standards and Technology (NIST). For more information please visit www.accellion.com or call (650) 485-4300. Follow Accellion on LinkedIn, Twitter, Facebook, and Accellion’s Blog. PacketZoom Mobile ExpresslaneTM improves user experience on mobile apps by eliminating performance roadblocks in the mobile last mile, helping mobile publishers boost app performance worldwide by accelerating and improving reliability of content delivery. PacketZoom’s SDK redefines mobile performance via in-app networking technology, customized for each user. By removing roadblocks in the mobile last mile, PacketZoom is able to significantly accelerate performance by 2x to 3x, rescue up to 80% of the sessions from TCP connection drop and reduce CDN costs. For more information: www.packetzoom.com.


News Article | May 10, 2017
Site: www.prweb.com

Go For Broke National Education Center (GFBNEC) today announced the launch of a national traveling exhibition, “Courage and Compassion: Our Shared Story of the Japanese American WWII Experience.” Funded in part by a 2016 grant administered by the National Park Service (NPS), the exhibit will chronicle the story of the Japanese American experience during WWII, and feature local stories of bravery and extraordinary support of Japanese Americans from communities across the country. From July 2017 through summer 2019, the exhibit will visit 10 U.S. communities where citizens extended a helping hand to Japanese Americans during and after the turbulent days of WWII. In the wake of the attack on Pearl Harbor in December 1941, many officials and community members viewed residents of Japanese ancestry, U.S. citizens and immigrants alike, with fear and mistrust. Japanese Americans were targets for harassment and discrimination, and families on the West Coast were forcibly removed to government-run incarceration camps. “Courage and Compassion: Our Shared Story of the Japanese American WWII Experience” will reflect on the Japanese American experience from Pearl Harbor through the end of the incarceration and into the redress movement that resulted in the Civil Liberties Act of 1988. The interactive exhibit, designed by Quatrefoil Associates, will feature images and audio of firsthand accounts, including interviews of Japanese American soldiers from GFBNEC’s Hanashi Oral History Collection. Each community partner will research and curate unique local stories of courage and compassion within the exhibit. “The exhibit honors everyday people who rose above the public hysteria of WWII to recognize Japanese Americans as friends, neighbors and citizens,” Dr. Mitchell T. Maki, GFBNEC’s President and Chief Executive Officer, said. “These untold stories have real relevance today as we confront issues of loyalty, citizenship, due process and Constitutional rights. Thanks to a two-for-one matching grant from the NPS’ Japanese American Confinement Site Grant Program, we raised a total of $568,406 to educate the public on the nature of bravery during a dark chapter of our history.” “Courage and Compassion” will debut in Salem, Oregon on July 13, 2017, in partnership with the Willamette Heritage Center. Despite the hostile climate following the Pearl Harbor attack, some Willamette Valley locals and leaders spoke up in support of their Japanese American friends. From farmers who helped their incarcerated neighbors save their crops to a local Senator who braved political backlash to suggest that Japanese Americans might remain loyal to the U.S., these individual voices of conscience deserve to be remembered today. Other community partners will include: Japanese Cultural Center of Hawai′i, Honolulu, Kahului and Hilo, Hawaii; the Kingsburg Historical Society, Kingsburg, Calif.; Oberlin College, Oberlin, Ohio; St. Marys School of Nursing Alumni Association, Rochester, Minn.; Twin Cities Japanese American Citizens League, Minneapolis, Minn.; Monterey Japanese American Citizens League, Monterey, Calif.; History Department, Bradley University, Peoria, Ill.; Chicago Japanese American Historical Society and Japanese American Service Committee, Chicago; and New Mexico Japanese American Citizens League, Albuquerque, New Mexico. More information will be released on each venue and its unique stories as the tour progresses. Note to Media: “Go For Broke” was the motto of the 442nd Regimental Combat Team, a segregated Army unit composed of Japanese Americans from Hawaii and the mainland. The term was Hawaiian slang for “shooting the works,” or risking everything for the big win in gambling—as the Nisei soldiers did while fighting in the field in WWII and facing prejudice at home in the U.S. About Go For Broke National Education Center Go For Broke National Education Center (GFBNEC) is a 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization that educates the public on the valor of Japanese American veterans of World War II and their contributions to democracy. Our goal is to inspire new generations to embody the Nisei veterans’ core values of courage, sacrifice, equality, humility and patriotism. Founded in 1989, GFBNEC maintains the Go For Broke Monument and the interactive “GFBNEC’s Defining Courage Exhibition” in downtown Los Angeles, as well as extensive oral histories and archives, education and training programs, and other initiatives. For more information, please visit http://www.goforbroke.org. About the NPS JACS Program This project is funded, in part, by a grant from the U.S. Department of the Interior, National Park Service, Japanese American Confinement Site Grant Program. For more information regarding the JCAS grant program, please contact Kara Miyagishima, Program Manager, Japanese American Confinement Sites Grant Program, NPS, at 303/969-2885.


News Article | May 12, 2017
Site: www.theguardian.com

Andrew Studer was admiring a massive lava fire hose at Hawaii Volcanoes national park when he spotted something unusual: a small quadcopter drone flying very close to the natural wonder pouring hot molten rock. “There were other visitors sitting out relaxing in somewhat of a meditative state, just trying to enjoy this phenomenon,” said Studer, who recently captured a viral image of a drone hovering near the lava. “I do feel like drones are extremely obnoxious, and I’m sure it was frustrating for some of the people there.” In recent years, there have been growing concerns about technology invading national parks, with drones and other noisy gadgets disrupting wilderness areas, wildlife habitats and other recreational areas. While the boom in drones has increasingly spoiled the natural sound that the National Park Service (NPS) is charged with protecting, there has also been a rising number of reports of social media use leading hikers to snap inappropriate and dangerous selfies, threatening wildlife and the environment in the process. “Being in nature, you should be focused on nature,” said Judy Rocchio, an NPS program coordinator, who works on preserving natural sounds. “Nature is very healing – leave the tech at home or put it away and turn it off.” As drones became increasingly popular in 2014, the NPS moved to ban the launching and landing of “unmanned aircrafts”, but the problem has persisted. Since the new rule went into effect, parks have issued 325 citations related to drones, according to spokesman Jeffrey Olson. “It was pretty quickly apparent that visitors who weren’t flying them didn’t like them,” he said. “People were really upset ... It’s like a buzzing bee you can’t get out of your head. People observed drones being used to herd wildlife.” The buzzing and clamor of drones, smartphones, music speakers and other tech gadgets that hikers can now carry in their hands isare contributing to damaging noise pollution, which is pervasive in US protected areas, according to a new study published last week. The park service, however, has no control over drones that fly from outside park boundaries, which has allowed some pilots to skirt the rules and enter protected areas. “There are very few places that still have a very natural quiet setting,” Rocchio said. “How are we supposed to manage wilderness when you have drones flying over them?” NPS surveys and research suggests that drones and other tech-related noises are disturbing both visitors and wildlife. Minnesota black bears experienced elevated heart rates when they saw drones in the sky, according to one study. Research further indicates that drones and similar aircraft and unnatural noises make it harder for wildlife to perceive natural sounds, which can interfere with communication, reproduction and survival. “Chronic exposures to relatively low sound levels could have significant impacts for animals by reducing their environmental awareness,” said Kurt Fristrup, an NPS senior scientist who co-authored the recent noise pollution study suggesting that human noises are often 10 times that of background levels. Sometimes the harm to animals are more obvious. In 2014, NPS sent out a press release titled “Drone Harasses Bighorn Sheep” after volunteers at Zion national park witnessed a remote-controlled drone flying close to a herd, causing them to scatter, leading a young sheep to become separated from the adults. Today, law enforcement in the area gets roughly once every two weeks about drones, said Zion spokesman John Marciano. “People come in the park for a peaceful zen spiritual-type experience and when they have hiked for four hours somewhere and they want to be in the wilderness and suddenly, they hear this ‘vrrrrrrr’ sound, it kind of kills the whole experience.” Other common gadget noises have increasingly annoyed visitors, according to park officials, who note research showing that natural sounds can have health benefits for humans. At Muir Woods national monument, a popular destination in California, cellphone and other human noise recently became such a problem that the park began putting up signs reminding people to be quiet, according to Rocchio. “If we don’t start thinking about this now, children of the future will never know what a natural quiet peaceful setting sounds like,” she added. In recent years, there have also been growing concerns about tourists displaying a lack of respect for nature in national parks, especially from visitors hoping to capture viral Instagrams. In an effort to take impressive photos for social media, park tourists have vandalized parks with graffiti, trampled on wildflowers in rare “super blooms” and faced attacks from bison. Marciano said there have also been increasing demands for internet service throughout Zion national park. “A lot of people want wifi access. They want to use their phone gadgets … They want to plug in,” he said, noting that there are park areas that now have wifi. “We have to adapt to new technologies.”


News Article | May 5, 2017
Site: www.chromatographytechniques.com

The call of the wild is getting harder to hear. Peaceful, natural sounds— bird songs, rushing rivers and rustling grass — are sometimes being drowned out by noise from people in many of America's protected parks and wilderness areas, a new study finds. Scientists measured sound levels at 492 places — from city parks to remote federal wilderness. They calculated that in nearly two-thirds of the Lower 48's parks, the noise can at times be twice the natural background level because of airplanes, cars, logging, mining and oil and gas drilling. That increase can harm wildlife, making it harder for them to find food or mates, and make it harder for people to hear those natural sounds, the researchers said. Colorado State University biologist George Wittemyer said people hear only half the sounds that they would in natural silence. "They're being drowned out," said Wittemyer, a co-author of the research. In about 1 in five public lands, there's a tenfold increase in noise pollution, according to the study in Thursday's journal Science. "It's something that's sort of happening slowly," Wittemyer said. Except for city parks, though, the researchers are not talking about sound levels that people would consider unusually loud. Even the tenfold increases they write about are often the equivalent of changing from the quiet of a rural area to a still pretty silent library. But that difference masks a lot of sounds that are crucial, especially to birds seeking mates and animals trying to hunt or avoid being hunted, Wittemyer said. And it does make a difference for peace of mind for people, he said. "Being able to hear the birds, the waterfalls, the animals running through the grasslands ... the wind going through the grass," Wittemyer said. "Those are really valuable and important sounds for humans to hear and help in their rejuvenation and their self-reflection." For study lead author Rachel Buxton, a Colorado State conservation biology researcher, it can be personal. She points to a Thanksgiving weekend hike last year with her husband in the La Garita Wilderness in southern Colorado. "We went to escape the crowds. We went to be totally isolated and have a real wilderness experience," Buxton recalled. "As we're hiking, aircraft goes overhead. You're walking along and you can hear the jet coming for ages." The research team, which includes a special unit of the National Park Service, not only measured sounds across the U.S., but they also used elaborate computer programs and artificial learning systems to determine what sounds were natural and which were made by people. "The study makes perfect sense to me," George Mason University biology professor David Luther, who wasn't part of the research. He said in an email that he's noticed more noise at many sites throughout the U.S. "Olympic National Park is currently suffering high amounts of noise pollution from military flight trainings low over the park and visitors have been complaining loudly about the diminished wilderness experience," he wrote. But there are still some places where you can get away from it all, Buxton said, highlighting Great Sand Dunes National Park in Colorado.


News Article | May 11, 2017
Site: globenewswire.com

PALO ALTO and SAN MATEO, Calif., May 11, 2017 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- Accellion, Inc., the leading provider in hybrid and private cloud secure content collaboration, and PacketZoom, a leader in mobile application acceleration, today announced they have entered into a development partnership. Under the terms of the agreement, the companies will work together to optimize performance models when sharing and editing large files, further enhancing the performance of Accellion’s kiteworks mobile application. As enterprise content continues to increase in size, spurred in part by the emergence of richer content types including high resolution images and video, a growing mobile workforce will place demands on file sharing applications to deliver content quickly. Documents, spreadsheets, presentations, images, videos and other file formats can range from several megabytes to gigabytes in size, and employee efficiency when collaborating on information with partners or clients will require faster network performance – particularly when using a smartphone or tablet. To stay ahead of this trend, Accellion has identified PacketZoom’s technology as an innovative approach to significantly accelerate content download speeds. Accellion and PacketZoom are currently testing PacketZoom’s Mobile Expresslane solution, integrated with Accellion’s kiteworks mobile application. Accellion anticipates being able to double download speeds using kiteworks’ mobile application once a version incorporating PacketZoom is available, which is expected in an upcoming release. “By reducing round trips over high latency and error prone mobile/Wi-Fi connections, Accellion sees in PacketZoom’s technology the means to transmit data and content from the origin server much faster and much more reliably than with legacy network based stacks,” commented Cliff White, CTO of Accellion. “PacketZoom’s network analytics should also provide great value to kiteworks and our customers by giving insights into how end users are interacting with content.” “Organizations are generating more content than ever, and the demand to share and collaborate efficiently on that content with external partners is increasing as well,” commented Jonathan Yaron, Chairman and CEO of Accellion. “By accelerating download speeds at the last mile, PacketZoom and Accellion are developing an innovative solution that addresses the challenges of delivering larger files, such as medical images for collaborative healthcare, or big data sets for financial analysis. PacketZoom’s vision – and the talented team they have assembled to execute on this vision – is just the kind of development partnership Accellion looks for to enhance our products and serve our customers’ needs. Together, I anticipate we will be able to significantly improve how enterprise employees share richer content and collaborate more effectively.” “We are excited about this partnership and look forward to working closely with Accellion to enhance the mobile enterprise experience, especially with regards to improving file download speeds and continuity,” stated Shlomi Gian, PacketZoom’s CEO. “Organizations in regulated industries that rely on kiteworks for secure collaboration while on the go, will be able to exchange data even faster, in a reliable way, thanks to the integration of PacketZoom Mobile Expresslane.” Accellion, Inc. enables enterprise organizations to collaborate on content with external partners securely via private cloud. Enterprises can leave existing content where it belongs, and extend it to the outside world without having to migrate content or disrupt their business workflows. Accellion’s solutions are used by more than 15 million users and 2,500 of the world’s leading corporations and government agencies including Procter & Gamble; KPMG; Kaiser Permanente; Latham & Watkins; National Park Service; Umpqua Bank; Cargill; and the National Institute for Standards and Technology (NIST). For more information please visit www.accellion.com or call (650) 485-4300. Follow Accellion on LinkedIn, Twitter, Facebook, and Accellion’s Blog. PacketZoom Mobile ExpresslaneTM improves user experience on mobile apps by eliminating performance roadblocks in the mobile last mile, helping mobile publishers boost app performance worldwide by accelerating and improving reliability of content delivery. PacketZoom’s SDK redefines mobile performance via in-app networking technology, customized for each user. By removing roadblocks in the mobile last mile, PacketZoom is able to significantly accelerate performance by 2x to 3x, rescue up to 80% of the sessions from TCP connection drop and reduce CDN costs. For more information: www.packetzoom.com.

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